Geyre Things to Do

  • Sebasteion with renewed southern facade
    Sebasteion with renewed southern facade
    by mtncorg
  • Southern facade of restored Sebasteion
    Southern facade of restored Sebasteion
    by mtncorg
  • Tetrapylon and the grave of Kenan Erim beyond
    Tetrapylon and the grave of Kenan Erim...
    by mtncorg

Best Rated Things to Do in Geyre

  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    follow the guide! first of all,the theater!

    by cbeaujean Written Nov 18, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    visit of site follows an itinerary arrowed :it's rather difficult to deviate from the area where excavations go on.
    so,the first site you meet is the theater.(1st cent.BC)
    covered with buildings,recently excavated.
    10000 seats.

    theater
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    SOUTH AGORA

    by mtncorg Written Jun 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Earthquakes in the 4th and 7th Centuries damaged the city severely. The 4th Century trembler altered the local water table – emergency plumbing measures from this time have been identified. The plumbing measures have, however, not been very successful in the long run as much of the South Agora is under water – the water laps as far as the west end of the Sebasteion. The South Agora was added to the scene in the early to mid 1st Century CE in the same project that added the Sebasteion. Later, the Hadrian Baths, the new Bouleuterion and the tetrapylon gateway to the Temple of Aphrodite would be developed. The agora was dedicated to the Emperor Tiberius and featured a large ornamental pool which ran down the middle – the pool has vastly over flown today.

    Columns rising above the former agora Middle water feature has expanded a bit Overlooking Hadrian Baths and South Agora Exhibit shows former South Agora
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    THEATER

    by mtncorg Written Jun 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The theater is thought to have had room for some 7,000 people. Dramas and public assemblies took place here. It was built up against a prehistoric settlement mound. The stage building was built with money from Zoilus. Statuary has been removed to the museum while the mask friezes that used to adorn the theater are on display attached to a building just next to the Sebasteion.

    The theater of Afrodisias Friezes from the theater on display
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    MUSEUM – SEBASTEION RELIEFS

    by mtncorg Written Jun 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    … Sebasteion. These statue reliefs used to be mounted on the three-storied Sebasteion. One would enter from the agora to the west, walking through a large monumental gateway, and then walk down between the two sets of facing relief groups with a temple devoted to the worship of the imperial cult at the eastern end. The reliefs used to cover the faces of the upper two stories of the Sebasteion. They had been found in fragments – 10 to 20 pieces – which were originally reassembled between 1979 and 1981. Later – 1999 to 2007 – the reassembled reliefs were totally disassembled, restored further and then reassembled once more.

    The reliefs on the middle story of the south building dealt with heroes and gods of local, Greek and Roman lore: love stories showed the power of Aphrodite; heroes worked for the good of mankind – world rule is secured by partnership with the Olympioi – Olympian gods. Then on the upper story of the south building are the new gods – the Roman emperors, Augustus through Nero with Caligula missing. Again, world rule is secured by human partnership with both the old gods and the new gods – the Theoi Sebastoi Olympioi or the Olympian Emperor Gods. Stories are shown showing the emperors victorious in wars against barbarians: Claudius is spearing a prostrate and naked Britannia, Nero is triumphant over a naked and defeated Armenia.

    Part of the south section of the Sebasteion was reassembled between 2000 and 2011 and a few of the reliefs were copied and placed in the original position so as to give a visitor a better idea of what the complex once looked like.

    Fewer reliefs survived from the northern structure, which collapsed in the mid 4th century. The second story showed the ethne – various peoples – who had been brought into the Roman Empire by Augustus. Peoples – 50 were originally displayed – from Spain to Mesopotamia were displayed – the idea and the list of ethne being copied from a monument in Rome.

    The Sebasteion wing of the museum Ethne added to Rome by Augustus Nero crowned by Agrippina - whom he later killed Claudius spearing Britannia Claudius, Victor over Land and Sea
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    MUSEUM – PILLAR

    by mtncorg Written Jun 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Another important piece on display is a pillar that once stood in front of the synagogue here in Afrodisias – the synagogue has yet to be identified. On that pillar – dated to the late 4th Century – there is a list of donors who contributed to the synagogue with 110 names on the front and another 25 names on the left side. At the top are Jewish names with room for more below those listed. Then, below is a much larger number of names who were known as the
    theosebeis – go worshipper/fearers. Several of the names were members of the City Council – boya. This is direct evidence that there was a significant number of Gentiles that had become attracted to the Jewish faith to some degree, though not to the point of circumcision – full converts were listed in the Jewish section. It is the theosebeis that Paul was most interested in on his missionary trips in the eastern Mediterranean world. Paul offered full community without the need for circumcision, something that many Gentiles must have found as a much easier route to travel. By ‘stealing’ away some of the god worshipers from the local synagogues, he set himself up for confrontation with the Jewish authorities who would eventually get back at Paul when he was visited Jerusalem in the late 50’s – Acts 21: 17-28.

    Donor pillar to Afrodisias synagogue John Dominick Crossan explains pillar significance List of theosbesis donors to the synagogue City council god worshipers -'BOYA'
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    MUSEUM – MONUMENT TO ZOILUS

    by mtncorg Written Jun 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Friezes and base reliefs from a monument to C. Julius Zoilus are found in a special section within the museum. The monument dates to about 28 BC and were restored between 1993 and 1994. Zoilus was a slave of possibly first Julius Caesar and then Octavian. He came from Afrodisias originally and possibly ended up as a slave as a result of being captured by pirates. As a hardworking and trusted agent of Octavian, he was freed and given money and honor. Returning to Afrodisias, Zoilus made sure the city aligned itself with Octavian in the late Civil War against Mark Anthony. Being on the winning side made Zoilus even more esteemed and the city, as a whole, was able to reap the benefits. Zoilus’ money helped to build the Sebasteion, a colonnaded courtyard for the agora, and a new stage building for the city theater. He was the leading man of the city and a priest of Aphrodite. When he died, the proud city erected this monument to demonstrate Zoilus’ life and his virtues.

    Reliefs remember Zolius virtues and life Description of original monument
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    TEMPLE OF APHRODITE

    by mtncorg Written Jun 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Aphrodite was the Greek incarnation of an earlier local goddess similar to the case of Artemis at Ephesus. The temple was a focal point for the town and continued in another incarnation as a basilica with the coming of Christianity. Christian grafitti is carved into the stone pillars at the entrance.

    Temple of Aphrodite with Baba Dag rising beyond Lone columns have been re-erected Christian grafitti on old pagan temple
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    BISHOP’S HOUSE

    by mtncorg Written Jun 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This housing complex on the south side of the Temple of Aphrodite was originally built for some local, well-to-do, possibly the Roman governor. With the coming of Christianity, it became the palace of the local bishop. Afrodisias had several names during its long life. With the collapse of paganism, the town was renamed Stauropolis – City of the Cross – in the mid 7th Century. Many bishops from here are noted as having attended various Ecumenical Councils. The see was abandoned by the bishop in the mid 14th Century though Stauropolis remains a Roman Catholic see even today.

    Ruins of the Bishop House with Temple beyond Bishop House next to the Temple of Aphrodite
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    BOULEUTERION

    by mtncorg Written Jun 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Next to the Bishop’s House just south of the Temple of Aphrodite is the City Council House – Bouleuterion. The lower part survives today – some nine rows. An additional upper twelve rows with supporting vaults and arched windows has long since collapsed. The building dates to the late 2nd or early 3rd Century and probably replaced a smaller bouleuterion which was built along with the north agora in the late 1st Century BC.

    Speaking today in the Bouleuterion Old carved chair for the elite of the boule Exhibit shows what the building looked like
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    SEBASTEION/AUGUSTEUM

    by mtncorg Written Jun 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sebasteion in Greek or Augusteum in Latin, this magnificent three-storied monumental gateway is in the slow process of being put partly back together – anastylosis. The many statues – base-reliefs – that used to fill the monument’s niches are now on display in the local museum with a few plaster copies on display in the restored Sebasteion in order to give a modern visitor some idea of how the monument used to appear.

    The 1st Century CE dedicatory inscription notes the Sebasteion was built “to Aphrodite, the Divine Augusti and the People.” Aphrodite was the Greek interpretation of an earlier local goddess – not unlike the case of Artemis at Ephesus. What is important about Aphrodite however is that the family of Gaius Julius Caesar – Gens Julia – claimed to have been directly descended from Venus/Aphrodite. The monuments here raise the early emperors to the levels of the gods themselves. For more, see the entry for the museum and the Travelogue on the Sebasteion sculptures in detail.

    Sebasteion with renewed southern facade Southern facade of restored Sebasteion Copy of original Augustan victory atop Sebasteion Marcus Borg points to former gateway to Sebasteion Jewish grafitti from first floor pillar
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    TETRAPYLON

    by mtncorg Written Jun 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Built in about 200 CE, this magnificent gateway was erected leading off a main street in the ancient city into a forecourt in front of the Temple of Aphrodite. Nearby is the grave of Kenan Erim, the Turkish-American archeologist from New York University who was responsible for the 1962 excavatory beginnings.

    Tetrapylon and the grave of Kenan Erim beyond Tetrapylon was gateway to Aphrodite Closer view of the Tetrapylon Magnificence of of the Tetrapylon endures
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    MUSEUM

    by mtncorg Written Jun 2, 2012

    The amount and quality of stonework that has been recovered at Afrodisias is incredible. To try and ensure the ancient art stays around for awhile yet a museum has been built across from the ticket office. Interesting aside is that that large open area is what used to be the main public square of the town of Geyre – the modern day successor to Afrodisias. Out in front of the museum are some glorious sarcophagi. Inside, wonders wait. The first hall has Philosopher’s Row with Pythagoras, Sokrates, Alexander and Pindaros as some of those looking back at us from the wall. My group took a quick glance and then headed directly to the back of the museum where a new section has been added specially to exhibit the base reliefs from the …

    Alexander remembered as a philosopher Sarcophagus outside of the museum Philosopher's Row
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    opposite the theater,a huge square

    by cbeaujean Written Nov 18, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    in the center,a circular basin making easy the traffic of spectators during performances.

    at the bottom,marble columns belong to a thermal building.

    facing the theater

    Was this review helpful?

  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    odeon or council house,a marble wonder!

    by cbeaujean Written Nov 18, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    charming small building,1000 seats,jolly well preserved.
    its size gives it a certain intimacy,making a special attractiveness.

    odeon or bouleuterion
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    aphrodisias temple,main sanctuary

    by cbeaujean Updated Nov 18, 2004

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    built 1st cent.BC;changed into church by byzantine 4th cent.AC.
    originally 40 columns,nowadays only 14!

    aphrodisias temple
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Geyre

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

25 travelers online now

Comments

Geyre Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Geyre things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Geyre sightseeing.

View all Geyre hotels