Gullubahce Travel Guide

  • Temple of Athena with inscription to Augustus
    Temple of Athena with inscription to...
    by mtncorg
  • Looking from above at the pyrtaneion
    Looking from above at the pyrtaneion
    by mtncorg
  • Outside room where Augustan good news proclaimed
    Outside room where Augustan good news...
    by mtncorg

Gullubahce Things to Do

  • MYCALE

    Mount Mycale raises high above the old site of Priene. Today, much of the forests of the mountain are preserved in a national park. A short distance to the west of the town site was where in 479 BC the Battle of Mycale occurred. Herodotus tells us that it happened the same day as the Battle of Plataea in Greece. Both battles together ended Persian...

    more
  • CHURCH

    The stage are of the theater was reused as a church when Christianity took hold here in Priene. The former ambos - raised stand from which priest delievered his message from - is still present. The city was a seat for a bishop and Priene bishops were noted at least at two Ecumenical Councils. The remains of a synagogue has also been uncovered in...

    more
  • THEATER

    Carved into the slopes of Mt Mycale is the well-preserved Hellenistic theater. Five large seats for notables can be seen in the front row. The theater is thought to have been able to hold 6,000 people which would have been everyone in town and probably then some.

    more
  • PRYTANEION

    This is where the city’s sacred flame burned. In charge was the city’s head of state, the prytane though the flame itself was tended by a group of virginal women not unlike the Vestal Virgins of Rome. In this courtyard the important guests to the city were entertained.

    more
  • BOULEUTERION

    The city council meeting room is thought to have been able to hold several hundred people. In the 4th Century BC, Priene was a democracy similar to that form found in Athens with whom Priene was politically aligned. The head of state was known as a prytane who was also responsible for keeping the eternal flame of the city burning next door in the...

    more
  • GOOD NEWS ROOM

    Just to the east of the Temple of Athena when you are walking towards the Bouleuterion, you will find a series of rooms that were religious in purpose. In one room – ninth from the west and seventh from the east; there is a tree growing in it – used to be an inscription that described the “good news” – euaggelia - about Augustus. He restored “order...

    more
  • TEMPLE OF ATHENA

    Athena Polias is the same incarnation of the goddess Athena for which the Parthenon in Athens was erected – Athena, Protector of the People. As was the Parthenon the most important temple erected in Athens, so it was for the Temple of Athena here in Priene. As noted in the introduction, the completion of the temple – originally designed by Pythius,...

    more
  • The Temple of Athena

    The Temple of Athena is one of the most beautiful places in Priene.Five gorgeous marble Ionic columns, topped by elegant scrolls, are still standing over the ruined temple. The temple dating from the 4th century BC was designed by the renowned architect Pythius, who created the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient...

    more
  • Priene's theatre

    Carved into Mt. Mycale, the wonderful preserved theatre had places for 5,000 persons. This is one of the finest Hellenistic theaters left standing and has five armchairs carved in marble with ornate lion's paw arms and footrests, reserved for priests and other important persons.

    more
  • The Boulerterion

    The Boulerterion is one of Priene's buildings perfectly preserved until today. It is said that the Boulerterion is one of the best preserved in Anatolia. With 640 seats, the Boulerterion was the building where the city council took care of municipal business.

    more
  • Priene's aqueducts

    The walls surrounding Priene were 2 meters wide and 6 meters high. The front and rear faces of the walls were built of squared stone blocks while the space in between was filled up with rubble and mud. The Acropolis, located on a very steep mass of rock in the rear part (north) of the city, was also surrounded by walls and watch towers. In the...

    more
  • Priene's walls

    Water was supplied through aqueducts to the reservoir located on the north-eastern part of the city.From there through an elaborated network of baked earthen pipes it was distributed to the whole city.

    more
  • Priene's gates

    Priene had three gates, one on the west and the other two on the east. The "East Gate" was the main gate of Priene, while the West Gate opened into the widest street of Priene.The south-eastern gate was named the "Source Gate".

    more
  • Priene's grid system

    Priene is a perfect example of the ancient cities planning. The city was built in accordance with the "grid system" developed by the architect Hippodamus of Miletus. The side streets, which had 3.5 meters in width, were built in steps because of the sloping ground and crossed one to each other in right angles.On each angle there were blocks made...

    more
  • Where Priene lies...

    Priene lies in the south-western part of Soke, within the boundaries of Gullubahce village, on the southern slopes of Mt. Mycale. The city was bounded on the north part by the steep stretches of Mycale, on the south by the Maeander valley and on the south-east by the mountains of Latmos. In ancient times Priene was located at 7.5 km from the sea,...

    more

Gullubahce Off The Beaten Path

  • Diana75's Profile Photo
    View to the House of Alexander

    by Diana75 Updated Mar 24, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Alexander the Great came to Priene and spent some time in a modest home, the so-called today "House of Alexander".

    While staying here, Alexander the Great also financed a portion of the Temple of Athena after taking Priene from the Persians.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

    more

Gullubahce Favorites

  • Diana75's Profile Photo
    View of Priene

    by Diana75 Updated Mar 24, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It is believed that the name of Priene is not Greek but is related to some names of Cretan origin, such as Praisos and Priansos.

    It seems that Priene was one of the cities of the Kingdom of Ahhiyava, which is believed to have been founded in the Miletus region, but it is also believed that Priene was founded (like Pitane, Myrina, Kyme and Ephesus) by Amazon queens.

    The city was, like all lonian cities, attacked by the Kimmers in the mid 7th century BC, but at the end of the 7th century BC, Priene was captured by the Lydians and remained for some time under the rule of this kingdom.

    At the beginning of the 6th century BC, Bias, one of the "Seven Sages" was born in Priene, and he put into order the laws of this city.

    Up to the mid-4th century, the city, thought at times under the influence of Athens, was more under the domination of the Persians.

    During the Hellenistic period, which began with the victory of Alexander the Great over the Persians and his capturing of Anatolia, all lonian cities showed great prosperity. Alexander the Great gave the cities autonomy and abolished the excessive taxes paid to the Persians.
    After the death of King Attalus II of Pergamum in 133 BC, his lands were attached to Rome in conformity with his will.

    In the Byzantine period the city was a bishopric, and findings prove that, until the fall of the empire, it was still populated.

    At the end of this period Priene was completely deserted.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

    more

Instant Answers: Gullubahce

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

63 travelers online now

Comments

 
Explore Deeper into Gullubahce
Gullubahce Travel Guide
Map of Gullubahce

View all Gullubahce hotels