Iznik Things to Do

  • Yenisehir gate
    Yenisehir gate
    by Tuna_ank
  • St.Sofia (Ayasofya) church
    St.Sofia (Ayasofya) church
    by Tuna_ank
  • iznik museum
    iznik museum
    by Tuna_ank

Most Recent Things to Do in Iznik

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    ismail bey (Selcuk) hamami (Turkish bath)

    by Tuna_ank Updated Jul 9, 2010

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    This Turkish bath is closed because it is not in good condition. But we could go into the bath. You try too. Because it is cieling is very different than others at spiral shape. It builded between 14. cc 17.cc?

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    Roman Road

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

    Part of a Roman road has been excavated beside the Murat Hamami which is located along the main north-south road to the north of the Hagia Sophia in the town centre. It dates between the 1st and 2nd centuries and features columns.

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    Murat Hamami

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    This bath-house is located along the main north-south road to the north of the Hagia Sophia in the town centre. It was built at the end of the 14th century and has sections for men and women. It was recently restored in 2007 and several ceramic and jewellery shops have opened around it. There is also part of a Roman road near it (see next tip).

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    Iznik Lake

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    Iznik sits on the eastern shore of a huge 290 sq km lake which is known as Iznik Lake. I drove to Iznik from Bursa and drove along the lakes southern shore which is a very picturesque drive through small towns and villages with farmers and local people harvesting olives.

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    Roman Theatre

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    Near the walls to the south-west of the town centre lies the remains of a Roman Theatre which was built on the orders of Emperor Trajan between 111 and 112 AD. The stones of the theatre, which was raised by means of vaulted spaces on flat land and had a seating capacity of 15,000, were dismantled and used in the construction of the city walls by the Byzantines. A church was built near it in the 13th century when the area was used as a cemetery.

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    Hagia Sophia

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    The most famous sight in Iznik is this former church which was built by Byzantine emperor Justinian I in the 6th century and modelled after its larger namesake in Istanbul. It's famous because it was here, in 787, that the seventh Ecumenical Council (also known as the Second Council of Nicaea) was held by Roman Catholics to restore the honouring of icons and holy images which had been suppressed by imperial the Byzantine Empire during the reign of Leo III (717 - 741). It had just finished being restored when I visited, not for the first time as it has been restored many times following an earthquake in 1065 and during the capture of Iznik by Sultan Orhan in 1331. After the Ottoman conquest it was converted in a mosque but was destroyed, again, by a fire in the 16th century. Construction was supervised by the great architect Mimar Sinan who added the minaret.

    Admission: TL7.

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    Ottoman Kiln Excavations

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    On these grounds in the centre of town are the remains of the kilns that once stood here which produced the ceramic tiles that were Izink's claim-to-fame. You can find the tiles in every Ottoman mosque in places like Istanbul, Edirne and Bursa. Production ran from the 15th-17th century (on the remains of a 4th century building), and some of the kilns are restored under the roofs.

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    • Archeology
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    Church of the Koimesis

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

    All that remains of this church are ruins. It's located just east of the bus station and was originally built around 800 AD and is said to be the burial place of the Byzantine emperor Theodore I (1175-1222, also known as Lascaris). It was Lascaris who built Iznik's (then known as Nicaea) outer walls and established his court here.

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    Yesil (Green) Mosque

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    This is Iznik's most famous mosque and is so-called because its minaret features some beautiful green-turquoise-blue mosaics. It was built between 1378 and 1387 by Sultan Murat I and looks more like earlier Seljuk edifices rather than Ottoman mosques.

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    Seyh Kutbettin Mosque

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    This mosque is located to the left of the museum and is dedicated to Seyh Kutbuddinzade Mehmet Izniki, who died in 1418 and who was an important scientist. His most important work is the first Turkish catechism. The mosque itself was built in 1492 and has been recently restored.

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    Iznik Museum

    by Willettsworld Updated Mar 7, 2010
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    This museum is housed in the old soup kitchen that Sultan Murat I had built for his mother, Nilufer Hatun, in 1388. It exhibits some fine examples of Iznik's claim-to-fame - ceramic tiles which you'll find in every Ottoman mosque in places like Istanbul, Edirne and Bursa. It also displays some Roman artefacts such as sarcophagi, pottery and figurines as well as Byzantine jewellery, and an 8000 year old skeleton buried inside a large jar. Outside are Roman capitals, huge pots, more sarcophagi and tombstones.

    Open: 9am-noon & 1-5pm Tue-Sun. Admission: TL3.

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    Esrefzade Mosque

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    This recently restored large mosque is, again, located in the centre of town and features a wonderful minaret. It also has several tombs along the outside wall, one of which is that of Esrefzade Abdullah Rumi who was a 15th century scholar who compiled a collection of his poems and wrote a book about religious thoughts and emotions in harmony with his mystical point of view.

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    Kirgizlar Tomb

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    This tomb lies just outside the southern gate known as Yenisehir Gate and was built in memory of the Kirgiz people who contributed to the conquest of Iznik and the foundation of the Anatolian Seljuk state by Sultan Orhan Gazi at the end of the 11th century.

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    City Walls & Gates

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    The ancient walls, with their towers and gates, are in relatively good preservation. Their circumference is 3,100 m (10,171 ft), being at the base from 5 to 7 m (16 to 23 ft) in thickness, and from 10 to 13 m (33 to 43 ft) in height; they contain four large and 12 minor gates and 114 towers. In some places columns and other architectural fragments from the ruins of more ancient edifices have been inserted. As with those of Constantinople, the walls seem to have been built in the 4th century with some of the towers having Greek inscriptions. The best of the gates is Lefke Gate on the eastern side which actually comprises three gateways that date from the first century AD, and an inscription thanks Hadrian for having it restored after an earthquake in 120 AD.

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    St. Sophia Cathedral - mosaic pavements

    by mvtouring Written Oct 21, 2009

    The highlight for religious travelers and historians are the ruins of the 4th-century St. Sophia Cathedral, the site of the Second Council of Nicea. It is located in the town center. Renamed Orhan Ghazi Mosque in 1331 and badly damaged by earthquake and fire, the building was restored by the famous architect Sinan in the 16th century. On the wall of a grave room is a fresco of Christ and there are surviving mosaic pavements on the floor.

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Iznik Things to Do

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