Troy Things to Do

  • Ruins at Troy, 1.
    Ruins at Troy, 1.
    by John195123
  • Ruins at Troy, 2.
    Ruins at Troy, 2.
    by John195123
  • Ruins at Troy, 3.
    Ruins at Troy, 3.
    by John195123

Most Recent Things to Do in Troy

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    South Gate

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is the South Gate of Troy VI that was probably the principal entrance to the citadel. Of the gate, only the roadway survives today. It led in a straight line up into the citadel and was entirely paved with stone slabs. In the middle of the road a drainage channel, possibly of Troy VII date, runs beneath the paving-stones.

    The South Tower (measuring 10 m x 9.5 m) was added to the citadel only later in Troy VI. The walls, whose execution is like that of the walls of the East Tower, are built directly on bedrock and are preserved to a height of two metres. Immediately in front of the tower stood several stone stelae – evidence of a typical ancient Anatolian gateway cult.

    To the left, behind the South Tower, a pillar shows the location of the “Pillar House”. With an area of 27 x 12 m, this was one of the largest houses in Troy VI. In the hall of the house stood two pillars which probably supported a heavy roof or possibly even a second storey.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Roman Odeon

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    The Roman Odeon was intended for the presentation of musical performances. Visible behind it are the Troy VI fortification walls and a pillar which belongs to a large house, the “Pillar House” of the Troy VI period.

    The Odeon, the baths and the nearby Bouleterion lie at the edge of the agora, the market place, where the public life of the city was focussed. The Odeon has a semi-circular orchestra, with a skene (stage-building) in which stood an over-sized cuirassed statue of the Emperor Hadrian (AD 117-138). The orchestra is bordered by a wall of lime-stone slabs above which rise tiers of seats constructed of large limestone blocks and divided by aisles into wedge-shaped sections.

    Slightly to the left, behind the trees is the Bouleuterion (council-chamber) of Greek and Roman Ilion. One part of the building lies over the Troy VI fortification wall. The interior was enclosed on all four sides by a wall so that the council could conduct its business in private.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Lower City

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This is the lower city, to the west of Troy VI-late VIIa citadel (14th-13th century BC). Stone foundations of well built houses are clearly visible; they are very close to one another. The houses flank the street leading to the citadel.

    The almost complete foundation walls of a terrace house are particular important (Troy VIIa). At the back of the house, the rooms rise to two storeys. The finds of a bronze statuette and a terracotta bull figurine suggest that cultic performances might have taken place in one of the rooms.

    After the destruction of Troy VI by an earthquake, the city gate was blocked and the street system was changed. Finds such as weapons, burnt strata and skeletons suggest that Troy VIIa (c. 1180 BC) fell as the result of an attack. In the following period Troy VIIb, when foreigners from the Balkans came to Troy, the settlement was concentrated in and close to the citadel. The streets and squares are filled with house walls and big storage jars (pithoi).

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Sanctuary

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    The sanctuary was, perhaps, founded as early as the first quarter of the seventh century BC. It was dug into the ruins of the lower town of Troy VI and VII and these Archaic remains seem to have included altars, walled precincts and large buildings, perhaps temples. Best preserved is the altar in the so-called Lower Sanctuary. It is not known to which god or gods the Archaic Sanctuary was dedicated, but it remained in use throughout the Hellenistic period and long into Roman Imperial times.

    In the middle of the third century BC, a new and lavishly decorated building was constructed to the side of two open air precincts (the Upper and Lower Sanctuaries). The interior of the building featured painted plaster and a pebble mosaic with a cutting in the floor for a torch and the base of a statue. During the first half of the second century, this Mosaic Building was dismantled and two new temples were built side by side. The elaborate decoration within the Mosaic Building indicates that religious activity occurred inside, as does the existence of the torch base. Such a layout suggests that the Sanctuary was associated with secret rites and this identification is consistent with the plans of the Upper and Lower Sanctuaries. The exterior walls of both precincts were nearly four metres high, which indicates that sacrifices at the altars were screened off from the uninitiated. The sanctuary was built at a site where the island of Samothrace can easily be seen, and it seems likely that this is the Sanctuary of the Samothracian gods mentioned in Trojan inscriptions.

    The Sanctuary suffered severely in the destruction of Ilion by Fimbria in 85 BC. As a part of a later reconstruction, instigated by the Emperor Augustus (31 BC – AD 14), a new altar was built at a higher elevation. Beside it are the stepped foundations of what was probably a grandstand used for viewing religious ceremonies.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Palace House VIM

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This building stood on the lowest terrace of the great citadel mound and formed part of the Troy VI palace complex. The ceramic finds of this period display not only an advanced, independent style, but also a taste for Mycenaean imports. Immediately noticeable are four vertical offsets in the wall. The stones here are carefully cut. This detail indicates the taste of the occupants of the palace and their desire for prestige. This achievement is all the more impressive when one considers that iron tools were not available in this period. Homer repeatedly mentions the “beautiful” walls of Troia/Ilios.

    Inside the L-shaped layout of House VIM were several rooms about whose function little is known. Storage-vessels (pithoi) have been preserved, so there was storage here. A few steps show that there was a second storey, but none of it survives. Just as with the other buildings of the Troy VI period, the outer side-walls of House VIM are both oriented towards the central point of the citadel. This is evidence of a unified architectural plan, which guaranteed that streets of uniform width could run between the buildings, up to the centre of the citadel. House VIM continued in use and was enlarged during the succeeding phase of Troy VIIa.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Ramp

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    Part of the fortification wall contains the partially restored ramp of the Troy II citadel. Troy II was built on top of the remains of Troy Ia-Ie (i.e. Early and Middle Troy I) and is subdivided into eight building-phases, IIa-IIh.

    During this period the circuit-wall was several times built further out so as to enlarge the citadel. The rebuilding’s can be recognised in the remains of the earlier, partly walled-up gates. The wall in the final phase of Troy II consisted of a substructure of limestone with layers of mud brick above. It was around 330m long and 4m thick and enclosed an area of about 8800 sq. m. The entrance gate was approached by an impressive ramp paved with flat stones and flanked by mud brick walls. But its size and position probably make the eastern gate, a more plausible candidate for the main entrance to the citadel.

    There was probably a stone rampart (unexcavated) to overcome the difference in altitude between the approach-road and the settlement. The Troy II citadel came to an end with a catastrophic fire which left behind a burnt layer more than two metres thick. To the left of this gate, Schliemann found the legendary “Priam’s Treasure”. This discovery, together with the burnt layer, caused Schliemann to believe that Troy II was the Homeric Troia/Ilios that he was looking for but he was off by a good 1200 years. But in 1890, the last year of his life, he recognised his mistake. The more than twenty “Troy Treasures” are currently preserved in eight different locations in seven cities, including, since World War II, Moscow and St. Petersburg.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Layers of settlement

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the best sites to see the different layers of Troy settlements (of which there are a total of nine), is close to the Ramp. Each layer has been clearly marked to give some idea as to how and when each was built.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Schliemann Trench

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    During the first three years of excavation, Schliemann had a deep north-south trench, 40 metres wide and seventeen deep, dug through the centre of the mound. It was conceived as a test-trench, reaching down to bedrock, by means of which Schliemann hoped to find “Priam’s citadel”. In the course of this operation important building remains from overlying layers were partially destroyed. At the bottom of the trench Schliemann found remains of walls belonging to the Early Troy period (c. 2920 BC). It was only in the American excavations of the 1930’s, and in the work carried out since 1988, that the Troy I period was more closely studied.

    Directly below the spot are the remains of a sloping stone wall backed by a rubble fill. This is thought to be a rampart-like Early Troy I fortification. The rows of parallel, rough stone walls are the foundations of relatively large, close-set houses of the Early Bronze Age (c. 2920 BC). Some of these elongated houses had porches. Of particular interest is the “herringbone” technique in masonry in which stones are laid diagonally.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Fortification Wall

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This is a section of the fortifications of Early and Middle Troy I, together with a tower. The gateway was only two meters wide. Troy I was built around 2920 BC directly on bedrock.
    Archaeological deposits four metres deep suggest a long period of occupation. The slightly inward-sloping fortification wall encloses a settlement which had a diameter of about ninety metres.

    In front of the tower stood at least one stone stele with relief decorations showing the upper half of a human figure possibly holding a weapon. The tradition of such stelae seems to live on at Troy for centuries: a good 1000 years later such stone stelae reappear in front of the south gate of Troy VI.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Megaron Building

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This Megaron (building with a porch) of mud brick was built directly inside the Citadel Wall. The Megaron was found with its walls still standing to a height of over 1.5 metres. Radiocarbon dating of barley corns found in the building show that it ceased being used between 2290 and 2200 BC. Destroyed by fire, the Megaron is notable for a central round hearth measuring 1.2 metres in diameter. The walls were covered with white plaster and the imprint of reed matting is visible on the plastered floor. The wealth of finds made here indicates that at least part of it may have been used for cult purposes. More Megara buildings abut on this structure to the north but they have only been partially excavated. Since the alignment of this group of buildings deviates from that of Troy II, they evidently represent a later, transitional phase between Troy II and III.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Temple of Athena

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    These are the remains of the foundations of an altar which belonged to the Greek and Roman temple of Athena. The remains of this temple had already been removed by stone-robbers when Schliemann began his excavations in 1871. Other limestone foundations were discovered at the same level. These derive from statues, altars and other small architectural features in the courtyard of the temple precinct, and some of their marble fittings have been found.

    The temples, whose base measured 36m x 16m, was surrounded by a Doric colonnade supporting a coffered ceiling. Outside, on the entablature, were metopes (reliefs), the most famous of which shows Apollo/Helios which is now displayed in Berlin. It is thought that the temples was built by Lysimachus, one of Alexander the Great's successors, around 300 BC and was restored in Roman times.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Northeast Bastion

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    The Northeast Tower, the most massive of Troy’s bastions, belongs to the heavily fortified citadel of Troy VI. The tower encloses a ten-metre deep artesian well which was sunk during Troy VI and restored during Troy VII. This tower, which was also accessible from the outside, consisted of an enormous stone substructure measuring 18 x 8 metres and standing at least 9 metres high (today only seven metres). On top was a superstructure on unbaked mud brick, although what this looked like is not known.

    During the period of Troy VIII-IX the tower was built over by the enclosure-wall of the Athena temple precinct. During Troy VIII a narrow staircase, not visible from here, ran down the north face of the tower to another, more low-lying well. To the east the tower was joined by the circuit-wall of the lower town. There's some great views over the surrounding farmland from here.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Citadel Wall

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    This reconstruction built with hand-made and fired mud brick preserves the original mud brick material, which is concealed inside this wall to its full height (approx 4 m). A fire gave the original brick of the upper and outer part of the wall its current colour and this colour has been reproduced in the reconstruction. Directly behind it, inside the Citadel, is a mud brick Megaron (building with a porch) with a stone foundation excavated in 1998-99.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    East Wall and Gate

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This is the outer wall of the Greek and Roman temple precinct from the period of Troy VIII/IX (third century BC - c. AD 500). In front are the fortifications of Troy which include the East Tower, the East Wall (with its gate) and behind them the palaces – all of the Troy VI period (c. 1700-1250 BC).

    The total circumference of the fortification-wall around the citadel amounts to 550 metres of which approximately 330 are still preserved. This wall, built out of rectangular limestone blocks, is subdivided by vertical offsets placed at regular intervals. These continued the lines of the corners of the timber-framed superstructure which probably once stood on the wall. The slightly inward-sloping substructure of the wall is 6 metres high and 4.5-5 metres thick. The superstructure, no longer preserved, reached up a further 3-4 metres.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    East Wall Tower

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 6, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is the first thing you'll see as you overlook the ruins. This massive tower, built outside the wall only in a later phase of Troy VI, is very carefully worked. It is eleven metres wide and projects eight metres from the face of the wall. Its eastern wall is three metres thick. The tower consisted of two storeys, with a wooden floor in between. Access to the tower was only possible at the second-storey level.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Troy

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

66 travelers online now

Comments

Troy Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Troy things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Troy sightseeing.

View all Troy hotels