Pamukkale Things to Do

  • It can get pretty busy.
    It can get pretty busy.
    by John195123
  • Dress code varies?
    Dress code varies?
    by John195123
  • Many pools from which to choose.
    Many pools from which to choose.
    by John195123

Most Recent Things to Do in Pamukkale

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    Views from above :)

    by Durfun Updated Jul 19, 2010

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    Dry (for now) west terraces, till the re-diversion
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    The views of both the travertine terraces, and surrounding countryside is stunning & peace-inducing.

    Due to water diversion in parts, for preservation of the mineral-rich terraces, not all the terraces have water in them.

    Once, the whole area was under threat due to rapid proliferation of hotels in the vicinity that were diverting the waters for their own use (to attract guests). Now, the site is regaining some stability after the hotels were knocked down & removed.

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    • Archeology

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    Check out the ancient amphitheatre

    by Durfun Updated Feb 28, 2010

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    In the distance..
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    This is quite grand. At the bottom are statues of Apollo & Artemis.

    You can just about make out the amphitheatre, at the rear right, as you arrive at the top of the travertines. It is certainly a fair walk!

    The stones near the stage were marked with the official's name initials, so certain people sat on specific seats.

    It's fun walking around the ruins, and figuring out how these huge stones were put together to form such a large structure.

    From the top, the views of the surrounding landscape are far-reaching and delightful. Definitely worth checking out.

    There are information boards at the rear, detailing the restoration project over the years.

    The restored Roman theatre dates back to the 2nd century, and the stage buildings and elaborate reliefs are in exceptionally good condition.

    Construction began in 62 A.D. by Flavius, two years after a large earthquake, and was completed in 206 A.D. It once had a capacity of around 12,000, and was adorned with columns and statues which were unearthed during excavations. There are marble bas-reliefs on the backstage walls.

    The theatre is still the venue for the annual International Pamukkale Song Festival in June, during which 7000 spectators can be seated.

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  • SurfaceTravel's Profile Photo

    Antique Thermal Pool

    by SurfaceTravel Updated Feb 4, 2010

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    Pamukkale Antique Thermal Pool

    This pool is at the top north entrance of the Pamukkale travertines, at the entrance to Hierapolis. We were there in April, so we didn't see the hords of other bathers that appear in some photos. There were maybe four people including us in the pool, total. It is heated naturally by hot water springs and there are countless old Greek columns in it under the water. In fact, you really have to be careful to avoid banging your shins on them. A marble portico fell into the pool in an earthquake in the 7th century AD, and the bits were never removed.

    There are ample clean and decent changing facilities and lockers available. It really is a super cool experience - one of the highlights of our whole trip.

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    • Water Sports

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    Hierapolis

    by SurfaceTravel Written Feb 4, 2010

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    Hierapolis
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    The ancient site of Hierapolis (190 BC - AD 1334) is just above the travertines. The ruins were fairly sparse but it was a good walk through wide open fields, there were some good photo opportunities, and we were practically the only people there.

    Afterwards we took a dip in the very cool thermal hot springs.

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    • Architecture

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    The Travertines

    by SurfaceTravel Updated Feb 4, 2010

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    Pamukkale Travertines
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    These are amazing limestone formations on the side of a cliff, best seen at sunset. We had seen one of Rick Steves' travel shows in the early 90s where he came here and showed all the people swimming. They have changed since then; they have degraded. They do not look like they do in thousands of travel posters. There isn't much water left flowing down through them, and most of the pools are now empty. The natural pools on the main hill are off limits, which are the ones in the show and on the posters. There are other seemingly man-made concrete pools by the man-made path/road carved up from below. That said, they are still a sight you are unlikely to see anywhere else in the world, and worthy of a visit.

    It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, along with Hierapolis.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Ancient Theater

    by mvtouring Written Oct 30, 2009

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    From far away you can already see the theater which is a Greek style building, situated on a hillside of approx. 91 meters high. The construction of the theater started in 62 A.D. it was however only completed in the Severus Era in 206 A.D.

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    Natural thermal springs

    by mvtouring Written Oct 30, 2009

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    The cotton castle was formed over thousands of years due to the calcium oxide-rich water which has been flowing down the hills of Caldag, leaving behind its residue which is making the hills look white.
    In the leveled terraces, the thermal spring water, which is approx. 33 degrees celsius, has formed natural basins, and when it gets full it naturally overflows into other basins below.

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THEATRE at HIERAPOLIS

    by balhannah Written Jul 14, 2009

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    The Theatre

    After an earthquake in 60AD a Theatre was built against the hillside. You can see that it had quite a few Statues behind the stage. There are only a few remaining. It also had a seat for distinguished spectators, and this is located in the centre of the seating area. The seating area is very steep. This Theatre is one of the best examples of Roman Theatre decoration.
    Worth the walk up the hill to have a look.

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    NECROPOLIS at HIERAPOLIS

    by balhannah Written Jul 14, 2009

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    Hellenistic Tumili
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    This is one of the largest preserved Ancient Cemeteries in Turkey. It is located outside the Northern walls of the city, and here you will see all types of Tombs & Funeral monuments dating from the Hellenistic era to early Christian times. On wandering around, I found lots of inscriptions. There is said to be 1200 tombs here, including Hellenistic tumili,(mound of earth over a grave) Roman Sarcophagi, Burial Chambers, and complete burial grounds from early Christian times. Interesting!

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    Walking the Travertines

    by balhannah Written Jul 14, 2009

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    Beautiful views

    After you have climbed to the top of the Travertines, make sure that you head to the left. There is a boardwalk that takes you along the edge with the most beautiful views over the area. You see Mountains in the distance. I thought this was the prettiest section, and there was hardly anybody here. Also have a look at the other side, more people had found this side, probably because of the Museum, Gift shop was near it.

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    TRAVERTINES

    by balhannah Written Jul 13, 2009

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    The travertines where you can splash around!
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    It is thought that the Travertines were formed over a course of 15,000years. As the 34degree celcius water gushes from underground springs with a Calcium bicarbonate content, it flows down the hillsides. Carbon monoxide gas rises and the Calcium bicarbonate dissolves, becomes sediment and turns into the White coloured Travertines. As you climb up to the top, following a "sort of" path, you will come across Travertines that have warm water in them. Also, along the side, water is running in a drain down the edge of the mountain. You are still allowed to splash and lay around in these pools, these are the only ones. Wear your swimming costume!

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    How to visit the Cotton Castle

    by balhannah Written Jul 13, 2009

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    In the photo, entrance is on the left, beside lake

    I guess we all come here for one thing, that is to visit the "Cotton castle" and to look around Hierapolis ruins. There are three entrances.
    1 - Is in the township, you will see an Admission booth and you then walk between the travertines about half way up the mountainside. You MUST TAKE YOUR SHOES OFF.
    If you are visiting on your own, have come by Bus, this is the Entrance you will use.
    2. North Entrance is if you have a car. Drive about 2kms towards Karahayit. You pay your admission, then drive past the Cemetery to the top of the travertines and Hierapolis.
    3. South Entrance, once again is with your own transport. You drive to a large parking lot south of the Plateau, then walk for 15minutes to reach the sights. Not the best, use the others.

    Admission in 2009 was 20t/l ................this includes both of the sites.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Mosque

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    Pamukkale - Mosque
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    This Mosque (I didn't find its name) situated in the city center just opposite a hotel I lived in. As always you discover a mosque close to a place where you are going to spend a night when you hear a Muslim pray from somewhere above, haha!

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    Pamukkale Thermal

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    Pamukkale Thermal
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    This area attracted people for its old travertine and thermal water that it is believed to be good for health.
    The temperature of the water forming the travertines, which issues from the hot springs on the hills above, falls to around 33 C° lower down. You can see the table of chemical anlysis of hot spring waters at my pics.

    I was in Pamukkale in the early May when the air temperature was close to 20C. You can imagine how pleasant it was to swim in hot spring pool which has the name of Cleopatra.

    You can watch my 2 min 19 sec Video clip Pamukkale Thermal with Sertap Erener – Kumsalda – Turkish pop music.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Travertine

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    Pamukkale - Travertine
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    Travertine is a white concretionary form of calcium carbonate, usually hard and semi crystalline. There is snow-white landscape of terraced pools and small waterfalls. Terraced mineral pools give Pamukkale its name: Cotton Castle.

    The water in Pamukkale contains large amounts of hydrogen carbonate and calcium, which leads to the precipitation of calcium bi-carbonate. Every second 250 liters of hot water arises from this spring, precipitating 2.20 grams of chalk per liter of water or 0.55 kilograms of chalk every second. In the course of time some sources dried up because of earthquakes, while new ones arose in the neighborhood.

    The effect of this natural phenomenon has left thick white layers of limestone and travertine cascading down the mountain slope resembling a frozen waterfall. One type of these formations consists of crescent-shaped travertine terraces with a shallow layer of water, lying in a step-like arrangement down the upper one-third of the slope, with the steps ranging from 1m to 6 meters in height. The other form consists of stalactites, propping up and connecting these terraces.
    The oldest of these rocks is crystalline marble, quartzites and schists.

    You can watch my 2 min 06 sec Video clip Pamukkale Travertines with Nalan – Hic Hakkin Yok - Turkish pop music.

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Pamukkale Things to Do

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