Diyarbakir Things to Do

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Best Rated Things to Do in Diyarbakir

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    The city walls

    by dabuwan Updated Sep 2, 2003

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    The massive medieval walls encircling the city are the top attraction of Diyarbakir.
    They are made of black basalt and are very well preseved. Though the original walls had been probably built by the Romans, the actual ones date back to the early Byzantine period.
    Because of their length (5.5 kms) and good preservation, the Diyarbakir city walls are credited to be second in the world, just after the Chinese Great Wall.

    One of the four main gates through the city walls
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    River Tigri

    by dabuwan Updated Sep 2, 2003

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    The river Tigri borders Diyarbakir and it is of vital importance for the city and for the whole region.
    In contrast with the surrounding semi-desertic landscapes, the gardens along the river are very green and lush.
    The watermelons that are grown here reach 40 kg of weight and are famous through the whole country

    River Tigri
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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Cahit Sitki Taranci Museum

    by MalenaN Updated Oct 16, 2004

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    The poet Cahit Sitki Taranci was born (1910) in an old Diyarbakir house from 1820. As many of the old Diyarbakir houses from the Ottoman period it is made of black basalt. The house was divided into men's quarters and women's quarters, into summer- and winter quarters. The house is built around a very nice courtyard. In the museum there is an exhibition of the poets life and work.

    The courtyard
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    Esma Ocak Evi

    by MalenaN Updated Oct 18, 2004

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    Another beautiful old Diyarbakir house is Esma Ocak Evi. The house is striped in white and dark grey. In the rooms around the courtyard there is less to see than at Cahit Sitki Taranci Museum, but it is still worth a visit and has got a beautiful architecture.

    The house is just off Yenicapi Caddesi and is easy to pass, as there are no signs. When I came there the caretaker was showing a small group around and I walked around on my own. There is no entrance fee, but the caretaker expects a tip. I gave 2 000 000 TL, as that is the price for foreigners at many museums in Turkish towns. The caretaker did not think that was enough.

    The courtyard
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  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    ulu camii,a "syrian" mosque...

    by cbeaujean Written Feb 25, 2003

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    this mosque is built around a yard,as in syria and arab countries,(same plan as omeyyades mosque in damas),unlike turkish mosques,covered with a dome...
    was,in fact,the ancient syrian cathedral st tomas ,becoming mosque after islamic conquest.it's the reason why we find a lot of corinthian columns.

    ulu camii
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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    On Gözlu Köprü

    by MalenaN Updated Oct 19, 2004

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    If you walk south from the Mardin Gate and pass Gazi Köskü you will after another km come to the bridge On Gözlu Köprüsü (Ten-Eyed Bridge). It is a bridge from the 11th century crossing the Tigris.
    I did not walk that far but only saw it from the road to Gazi Köskü - I had walked enough for a while.

    Ten-eyed Bridge
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    The City Walls

    by MalenaN Written Jul 20, 2004

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    The wall going round Diyarbakir is impressive. It is almost 6 km long (only the chines wall is longer and bigger) and it is built of black basalt. The present wall is from early Byzantine time but was improved by the Seljucs.

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    The wall at night

    by MalenaN Updated Oct 19, 2004

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    At night the walls are lighted up and they look very beautiful and impressive.
    During the evening families and old and young people are visiting the parks by the wall. It's a nice place to go for a
    walk at.

    The city wall

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  • Askla's Profile Photo

    The Ten-eyed Bridge.

    by Askla Updated Jul 3, 2014

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    The Ten-eyed Bridge was constructed in 1065. It then replaced an earlier bridge.
    Two lines in Kufic script states that it was built by order of Nizamüddin and Müeyyidüddevle during the Kurdish dynasti which lasted from 990 until 1085, and that the architecht was Sancaroğlu Ubeydoğlu Yusuf. The bridge consists of ten arches hence the name On Gözlü Köprü in Turkish, or Pira Dehderi in Kurdish. It is also known as Dicle Köprüsü since Dicle is the Turkish name of Tigris which the bridge spans.
    It sits about 2-3 km south of of Mardin Gate.

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    Nebi Camii

    by MM212 Updated Mar 29, 2014

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    The first intramural mosque to greet the visitor from the northern city gate (Dağkapı) is known by its Arabic name, Nebi Camii (جامع النبي), or Mosque of the Prophet. It is sometimes referred to by its Turkish translation "Peygamber Camii". The mosque dates from the 15th century, during the Ak Koyunlu period ("White Sheep" Turkmen tribal federation), just before the Ottoman conquest. It was built in the typical local style (ablaq or أبلق) with alternating black and white stones, a single octagonal dome. The square minaret is of a later, early Ottoman-period construction, built in 1530 by a local butcher named Haji Hussein in the traditional style (unlike the typical Ottoman pencil-style), and is decorated with beautiful Arabic calligraphy. In later Ottoman times, the short pointed top was added, giving the minaret a more Ottoman flavour.

    Nebi Camii, Dec 2012
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  • terrycowan's Profile Photo

    Ula Camii

    by terrycowan Written Nov 3, 2006

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    This is the oldest mosque in Diyarbakir. It was constructed with the stones from the demolished Orthodox Cathedral. The interior is somewhat different in style than most mosques (similar to the Ula Camii in Mardin). Beware of Ahmed. He will want to take you to his uncle's carpet shop.

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  • Askla's Profile Photo

    Ulu Camii.

    by Askla Written Jul 3, 2014

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    Ulu Camii (the Great Mosque) is the third shrine on the same spot. The oldest was a church called St Thomas. It was replaced by a mosque and in 1091-92 the Ulu Camii was built.
    The mosque sits on the southern side of courtyard because Diyarbakir is on the 40th meridian of the Eastern Hemisphere like Mecca and therefor all mosques in the town should be built on a north-south axis.
    The gates and columns are richly decorated with elaborate stonework. One can also find many inscriptions, even in Greek!
    The eastern portico was completed in 1117 according to a Kufic inscription, while the western portico was completed in 1164.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Mardin Gate (Mardin Kapı)

    by MM212 Updated Apr 4, 2014

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    The southern gate of Diyarbakır is named after Mardin, the city towards which it leads. It is also known in Arabic as Bab el-Tel (Hill Gate). It marks the end of Gazi Caddesi, the Roman Cardo Maximus. I only saw it from inside the walled city, as in the attached photograph. The part of the wall that connects Mardin Gate with Urfa Gate in the west is the best preserved part of the ancient wall, and about 3km south of the Mardin Gate lies the 11th century 10-arched bridge that crosses the Tigris River.

    Mardin Kapı, Dec 2012
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  • terrycowan's Profile Photo

    Meryama Kilesesi (Church of the Virgin Mary)

    by terrycowan Written Nov 3, 2006

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    One of the oldest functioning churches in the world--from 397 AD or so. Have good directions first. The church compound is hidden behind a wall, with only a nameplate for identification. There are 3 families of Suriani Orthodox Christians remaining in the city. We arrived late in the day (6 PM or so) and were consequently able to stay for part of their Vespers service--in Aramaic, no less. The single icon in the church is of St. Ephraim.

    Outside view of Church of the Virgin Mary Icon of St. Ephraim in Church of the Virgin Mary Interior view of Church of the Virgin Mary

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  • jorgejuansanchez's Profile Photo

    The metal doors of the wall

    by jorgejuansanchez Written Aug 23, 2014

    The walls of Diyarbakir are in teh tentative list of UNESCO.
    When walking around observing every gate and the details, I came across this door and took the picture.
    That wall deserves to be in the UNESCO list. Perhps in a near future it will be included.

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Diyarbakir Things to Do

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