Gaziantep Things to Do

  • zeugma
    zeugma
    by traveloturc
  • Entrance to the mosque.
    Entrance to the mosque.
    by June.b
  • The Sirvani Mosque minaret.
    The Sirvani Mosque minaret.
    by June.b

Best Rated Things to Do in Gaziantep

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Naib Hamam (Historical Turkish Bath)

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Glasses on the domes at the roof.
    4 more images

    According to records, this turkish bath is built before the year 1640, as mentioned in Evliya Celebi’s travel book. It is considered to be the “apple of the eyes” of the city in respect to its great location and architecture and considered to be one of the unique works of art of Gaziantep. There are what seemed to be several uniquely interesting upside-down clear glasses adorning its domes.

    Naib Bath was built in an area of 742 square meters. This place preserves the culture of the traditional hammam sauna, massage, skin care.

    This important historical tradition of Ottoman bath building, was part of the cultural heritage development programme conducted by the Municipality of Gaziantep in cooperation with the EU's GAP Cultural Heritage Grant Program, and opened in September 2007.

    It’s located at one side down the castle.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Backpacking
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    The Nuri Mehmet Pasha Mosque

    by June.b Updated Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ablution fountain at the mosque.
    4 more images

    This mosque is very near the hotel I was staying at (Ugurlu Hotel) and located within a very busy commercial district.

    As evidenced by Judicial Register and a firman (Ottoman royal decree), this mosque was built prior to 1786 by Nuret Mehmet Pasha. Two epigraphs on the minaret and mihrab show dates of 1785 and 1834.

    During the war of independence, the entire minaret and the domes of the praying portico were destroyed, and was repaired in 1954 by the Ministry of Education and was used as a museum until 1969.

    The new minaret was constructed in 1975 next to the mosque. The mosque consist of 2 sections each parallel to the kiblah (Mecca’s direction). The portal is decorated with black and white stones. Just as some other mosques in the city, the area in front of the Mihrab is domed but the other areas are covered with cross vaults. The portico is also domed. There is a large courtyard at the northern end with a “hazira” (tombs within an enclosure of a mosque). The tomb of Nuret Mehmet Pasha lies within this hazira.

    The mosque was restored by the General Directorate of Foundations in 2008.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Backpacking
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Zeugma Mosaic Museum

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The famous
    4 more images

    It’s a long walk from my hotel (Ugurlu Hotel) to the Zeugma Museum, took me less than half an hour of walking, but the weather is nice so no sweat. The museum is located at the back of the train station, from the other side of the train track.

    This is one of the highlights of the city of Gaziantep, in fact, it’s my main purpose stopping by this city on my way to Midyat and Mardin. The museum is a modern-architecture building and it’s huge. I was the first to enter, not much people during the March (2013) I was there.

    The Zeugma Museum is the largest mosaic museum in the world and houses an awesome Roman mosaic collection in its more than 7,000sqm space, in 3 floors. The mosaics were salvaged from the rich and cosmopolitan ancient Roman city of Zeugma. A city founded by a general under Alexander the Great in 300BC.

    Most of the works are laid out on the floor, lots of them big ones like an area of a typical bedroom, and there are also mosaic assembled and framed on the walls. The best display is very much secured inside a dark room, it’s called the “Gypsy Girl”, illuminated by a faint light.

    The museum opened to the public on September 2011.

    Entry fee is TL8, it’s a must see in Gaziantep.

    You may want to watch this video before seeing the mosaic collections in person - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUJ7PHCNOVs

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Backpacking
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    The Republic Square (Cumhuriyet Meydani)

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Cumhuriyet Meydani or Republic Square is the very center of the city of Gaziantep, just like any other republic square in many cities of Turkey, this is a large park with monuments and the governor’s office.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Backpacking
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    The Ali Nacar Mosque

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    As written on a sign infront of the mosque – “It is not known exactly when the mosque was built, however it could have been as early as the 14th century.

    It is thought to have been built by a carpenter called Ali Nacar, and used to be known as the Ali Nacar mosque. There is an inscription dated 1816, at which time the building was renovated, and further inscriptions on the mihrab (prayer niche) and sermon stand dated 1817 and 1819 respectively.

    The mosque is rectangular in design, divided widthways into two parts, each running parallel to the kiblah (direction of Mecca). The two halls are divided by stone supports and covered by cross vaults. The mihrab is decorated with coloured marble and painted ceramic tiles. The pulpit is made of marble and the sermon stand is notable for its woodwork and penwork (painted intricate geometric designs). The minaret balcony is covered with an "umbrella" roof and has decorative muqarnas beneath it (muqarnas: a type of corbel used as a decorative device in traditional Islamic architecture). The sundial on the base of the minaret is the only example of its kind in the area.

    In 2008, the general directorate for foundations carried out the construction of the minaret, landscaping of the surrounding are, and renovation of the nearby shops.”

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Medusa Archelogical Glass Museum

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entrance to the museum.
    4 more images

    Medusa Glass Artifacts Museum exhibits around 5,000 artifacts from the Roman, Greek, Hittite, Urartu, Byzantine and Islamic eras are on display covering the period between 7500 BC and 1600 AD, housed in 3 restored historical houses.

    The main exhibition is in a 3-storey house although the 3rd floor is under restoration so I was only able to see the first 2 floors.

    There’s also a room in one of the house that demonstrate glass making, souvenir shops where you can buy their hand-made glasses and a tea garden in the courtyard.

    The privately-owned museum is located near the Gaziantep castle.

    Entry Fee is TL4.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    The Sirvani Mosque

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ablution fountain of the Sirvani Mosque.
    4 more images

    The epigraph on the portal shows that the mosque is repaired in 1861 by Seyyid Mehmet Sirvani. During the renovation, a water tank with a fountain was added to the courtyard and the toilets placed under the ground floor. It is also called the Sirvani Mehmet Mosque and the “mosque with two minaret galleries” by the locals.

    It’s located near the Gaziantep castle just below the statue of a man on a horse below the castle, at one of the city’s oldest districts signifying that the mosque is one of the oldest buildings in the city. It is thought to have been first built as a Mevlevi semahane – where dervishes performs spiritual whirling dance. Built between 14th and 15th centuries during Durkadirli or Mamluk’s dynasty. The design of the mosque is square with a domed mihrab front. The minbar is of fine wood carving.

    It’s the first mosque in the city with two galleries on its minaret reached through two separate spiral stairs inside the minaret.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Backpacking
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Gaziantep Castle

    by June.b Updated Apr 15, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    It was under restoration when I was there in March 2013, so going up the citadel is not permitted. I was disappointed as it was my very first stop on this trip and it's already promising - NOT!

    So there I was, got contented gazing at it from below while munching on a chewy liver sandwich in front of the coppersmith bazaar.

    The Gaziantep citadel is built on top of a 25m high huge rock called Kudret, the Gaziantep Castle is located right in the middle of the old city centre. It’s surrounded by the bazaars and bedestans of the city.

    Although the history of castle is a mystery (it was thought as a Hittite castle) as a result of the excavations conducted there, Bronze Age settlement layers are thought to exist under the section existing on the surface of the soil.

    The castle was thought to have been first built in the 2nd and 3rd century AD during the Roman period. It was enlarged and strengthened by the Byzantium Emperor Justinianus between 527-565 AD.

    Be sure it's already open if yo're planning to visit it within this year - 2013 to 2014.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Backpacking
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    The Tahtani Mosque

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Inside the mosque.
    4 more images

    The date and the person who commissioned the construction of Tahtani Mosque are unknown but it is registered in a document dated 1557. The mosque was repaired in 1563 by the Osman Pasha, the governor of Maras, and a major renovations in 1804. Thought to have been originally built from woods as the name Tahtani or Tahtali (wooden) suggests.

    The area in front of the Mihrab is domed and the other areas are covered with cross vaults. The design of the mihrab is semi-circular made from red marble, and its interior is decorated with trefoil arched niches. The marble minbar is decorated with star, rosette and geometric shapes.

    The prayer portico has 4 pillars connected by arches.

    The Tahtani Mosque is located near the castle among the bazaars and bedestans of Gaziantep.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Millet Hani

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entrance of Millet Hani
    4 more images

    Thought to have been built between 1868 and 1869. According to sources, the first owner was Ascioglu Kesbar Kevork.

    Just like many ottoman period hans, the Millet Hani is built as 2-storey. The yard is surrounded by spaces at the ground floor and colonnades from four sides at the upper floor.

    Inside the han are several shops selling copper works, clothes and haberdashery. An old man in one of the shops is actually making a sort of textile or carpet using an old wooden equipment.

    In the middle of the big courtyard is a statue of a man sitting in the mid of fountain with the inscription that says the “Aydi Baba, 1812-1865”.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Gumruk Inn

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entrance to Gumruk Inn
    4 more images

    The inn was built during the years 1873-1878 by Hadji Omer Efendi, which is also called the Hadji Omer Inn.

    In the past, the building was used as a traveller’s inn. The skewed rectangular inn was built from cut stones and has a single courtyard. The ground floor was used as a stabling and storage. There are shops along the street side of the front entrance wall. A stone stairs in a corner of the courtyard lead to the upper floor where guests were accommodated.

    Now, it has several boutique shops that sells handicrafts like carpets, local dresses and shoes, and a nice exhibition hall also selling several hand-made decors and home haberdasheries.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Tarihi Yenihan

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gate to Tarihi Yenihan
    4 more images

    The main arched entrance of the Tarihi Yenihan has an inscription that says 1557, probably the year it was built. This han is near the Millet Han and the Gumruk Inn.

    Like most hans in Gaziantep, it has a big courtyard with several tables and chairs serving coffee and tea. There are several shops selling handicrafts, some replica mosaics, local shoes and carpets.

    Right at the entrance, there’s this guy making Turkish coffee using charcoals.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Backpacking
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    The Alauddevle Mosque

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    This mosque was built during the reign of the last Dulkaderoglu Bey – Alauddevle Bozkurt Bey – between 1479 – 1550. Only the minaret remains from the original mosque. The present mosque was built between 1903 – 1909 from voluntary donations from locals and Sultan Abdulhamid.

    The architect Armenak and the master builder Kirkor, were assisted during construction period by the locals from the city’s 32 districts. It’s also known locally as Ali Dola Mosque, a derivative of Aluddevle.

    While influences from Mamluk art can be seen on the minaret, the mosque is rich in decorative design. The entrance façade is enlivened by rows of black and white stones and on the other elevations. The interior of the arched Mihrab is decorated with flowers and hexagons.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Backpacking
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    The Karagoz Mosque

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Door to the mosque.
    3 more images

    This mosque was built by Koca Battal in the 18th century, according to maintenance records, the mosque was built in 1799-1800.

    The cut-stone mosque is rectangular in design, divided into 2 sections, each running parallel to the kiblah (in Mecca). Although only one of these sections survive at present time as the other section was reclaimed as a road. The 3 cross vaults over the main area remain, but the portal, the mihrab and the praying portico lost their intrinsic qualities during renovations. The fluted shaft of the cut stone minaret sits on the main body of the mosque. Under the “muqarnas” (a type of corbel used as a decorative device in traditional Islamic architecture), there are decorative rosette and palmate motifs and ceramic plates.

    A maintenance work was done in 2007 by the General Directorate of Foundations.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Backpacking
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • June.b's Profile Photo

    Zincirli Bedestan

    by June.b Written Mar 26, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The gate of the old grand bazaar.
    4 more images

    The Zincirli Bedesten, locally known as “black steps bazaar” is one of the is an Ottoman era covered bazaar built in 1781 by Hüseyin Pasha of Darende. According to records, there was formerly an epigraph on the south gate written by Kusuri, but this inscription is not in place today. This bazaar was used as a wholesale market hall for meat, fruit and vegetables.

    There are 73 stores inside the bazaar in the “L” shaped one-storey building, and 5 gates. The bedestan was restored by the General Directorate of Foundations in 2008.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Gaziantep

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

105 travelers online now

Comments

Gaziantep Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Gaziantep things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Gaziantep sightseeing.

View all Gaziantep hotels