local food, Istanbul

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  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Doner, Local Food, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Written May 13, 2013
    Doner, Local Food, Istanbul, TR
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    Döner .... " Turkish Fast - F ood " ... :)

    Either meat döner or chicken döner, its one of the most, probably "the most" consumed local food in Turkey by locals and also by tourists ....

    In each and every corner of the country, even in a megapol as like Istanbul or in a small village somewhere in Anatolia, you will find döner to taste for your lunch or dinner, or even packed for "on the go" ... :)

    Döner Kebap is a Turkish dish made of meat cooked on a vertical spit, normally veal or beef but also a mixture of these with lamb; a cheaper version of chicken is also found. The sliced meat of a Doner Kebap may be served wrapped in a flatbread such as lavash or pita or as a sandwich instead of being served on a plate. Seasoned meat in the shape of an inverted cone is turned slowly against a vertical rotisserie, then sliced vertically into thin, crisp shavings. Toppings include tomato, onion, lettuce, pickled cucumber and chili.

    There are many variations of Döner in Turkey:

    *** Porsiyon ("the Portion", döner on a slightly heated plate, sometimes with a few grilled peppers or broiled tomatoes on the side)

    *** Pilavüstü ("Ricetop", döner served on a base of pilaf rice that gets tastier as the fat in the meat drips into the rice)

    *** Iskender (specialty of Bursa, served in an oblong plate, atop a base of thin pita, complete with a dash of pepper or tomato sauce and boiling fresh butter)

    *** Dürüm, wrapped in a thin lavaş that is sometimes also grilled after being rolled, to make it crispier. It has two main variants in mainland Turkey.

    *** Soslu dürüm (sos, sogan, kasar; in English: sauce, onion, cheese) (speciality of Ankara, contains İskender kebap sauce, making it juicier)

    *** Kasarlı dürüm döner (speciality of Istanbul, grated kasar cheese is put in the wrap which is then toasted to melt the cheese and crisp up the Lavash)

    *** Tombik (literally "the Fatty", doner in a bun-shaped pita, with crispy crust and soft inside, and generally less meat than a dürüm)

    *** Ekmekarası ("in a bread", generally the most filling version, consisting of a whole (or a half) regular Turkish bread filled with doner)

    Does not matter whichever type you choose, I strongly advice you to taste Döner ... :)

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    Roasted Chestnut and Corns, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Written May 9, 2013

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    Roasted Chestnut and Corns, Istanbul, TR
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    "Kestane Kebap", thats what the locals call roasted chestnuts here ... Especially a must in winter time ... Hot and tasty chestnuts sold almost at every corner of the city centre. Great snack that keeps you warm while cold winds blow ... :)

    Kestane Kebab is sold by the street vendors. With a small metal grip the vendor puts the warm sweet chestnuts one by one next to each other. Before he puts them on the warm area of his cart he scores them with a sharp knife to prevent undue expansion and “explosion”. The roasting area has a pan-shaped metal receptacle with holes drilled into it and below it is the fire that roasts the nuts.

    Also the corns are so yummy and tasty ... Either you can have them as "boiled" in hot water and spiced with salt or "roasted" as like the chestnuts on same hot plate on a slow process ...

    I strongly recommend you to give a try .... :)

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    Midye Dolma, Local Food, TR

    by TrendsetterME Written May 6, 2013

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    Midye Dolma, Local Food, TR
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    Street food is ready-to-eat food or drink sold in a street or other public place, such as a market or fair, by a hawker or vendor, often from a portable stall. In Turkey, "Midye - Mussels" come in two forms:

    *** Midye Dolma - stuffed mussels with rice, pine nuts and raisins, eaten cold with lemon and olive oil,
    *** Midye Tava - mussels on a skewer, that are fried in oil, and eaten with a garlic sauce.

    One of the most amusing little bites is undoubtedly, the "midye dolma - stuffed mussels".

    The mussels are filled with cinnamon and pepper seasoned rice and served on the go with a squeeze of lemon. The carts topped with stacks of shiny mussels and lemon is a temptation any time of the day, but especially at night, Istanbulites seem to enjoy these bite sized treats even more.

    At night time, you can see "midye dolma" sellers at the popular spots such as Nevizade, Asmalımescit, Ortaköy where nightcrawlers flock by the carts to indulge in this filling midnight snack..

    Well, its said that some people have records of eating 50 pieces of shells at a time, if its not an urban legend .. :)

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Efes Pilsener beer

    by HORSCHECK Updated Apr 7, 2013

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    Efes Pilsener beer
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    My trip to Istanbul was actually a football trip, meaning that we drank quite a few beers during our time in the city. Interesting enough we only drank Efes Pilsener beer, if I remember correctly.

    The Efes Brewery is named after the Turkish town of Ephesus, which is located near Izmir. Here the first Efes brewery was founded in 1969. The company is a subsidiary of the Anadolugu group; the market leader in Turkey and many other countries in the region.

    Website: http://www.efespilsen.com.tr/

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    Salep

    by HORSCHECK Updated Apr 7, 2013

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    Salep drink
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    When I met VT member revontulet and a work mate of hers for dinner, they recommended to me to try Salep.

    Salep is a popular winter drink in Turkey and other countries of the former Ottoman Empire. It is usually made with hot milk which is flavoured by the flour of the tubers of wild orchids. Cinnamon is dispersed on top of it.

    In winter salep is available in restaurants and cafes, but also from street vendors. From shops like Koska (see my shopping tip) it can also be bought as a sort of powder to mix the drink at home.

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    Sweet Treat

    by Donna_in_India Updated Jun 8, 2011

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    Halka tatli

    This syrupy sweet treat - dessert ring - is made from semolina and deep fried. It's very rich. You can find these in street carts all around Istanbul. Not one of my favorites, but a definite must-try!

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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Chestnut sellars.

    by cachaseiro Updated Nov 19, 2010

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    Chestnut salesman in Istanbul.
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    Istanbul has a lot of guys who is selling chestnuts at their little colorful wagons that are parked around the city.
    They are usually found on the busy streets and by the bridges and i think they add to the good vibe of the city while they are selling their nice nuts.

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    Kestane.. roasted chestnuts!

    by Durfun Updated Jan 8, 2010

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    Notice the corn along the roof, some hanging too!
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    Try some sweet, tasty chestnuts!

    You'll see hawkers selling these, along with corn on the cob (boiled or roasted).

    Their carts are found around Sultanahmet area, especially beside Hagia Sophia, as seen in photo 2, at the far right. They have a distinctive red & white striped roof - hard to miss!

    Sold in various sizes (100, 150, and 400g), costing from 4/5/10 YTL. Served in little paper cups.

    It seems a lot of locals prefer eating the corn on the cob, particularly men - young boys and grown men! Prices for the corn ranged from 1 YTL (roasted) to 1.50 YTL (boiled & buttered).

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    Melt In Your Mouth Baklava!!

    by Donna_in_India Written Sep 16, 2009

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    Baklava

    Save room for dessert!! Baklava is a pastry made of layers of phyllo dough that is filled with chopped nuts such as pistachios, walnuts or pecans. It is usually sweetened with syrup or honey. In Turkey it is sweetened with sugar. It is so sweet and juicy, and just melts in your mouth! It is prepared in large trays and then cut into square/rectangular pieces. Baklava can be served at room temperature, rewarmed, or even cold. I think room temp was best.

    Although it it not certain, baklava is thought to have originated in the Ottoman Empire. It is further suggested that in its current form, baklava was developed in the Topkapi Palace kitchens.

    Be sure to bring some home with you!! There are sweet shops all around Istanbul. The store I kept returning to was Ali Usta Burma Kadayif & Baklava. (It was not far from the Beyazit tram stop towards Cemberlitas on the left side of the street.)

    An easy Baklava recipe from TurkishCook.com

    1 glass melted margarine
    1 glass of ground walnuts
    1 lemon
    1 teaspoon olive oil
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 eggs
    250 g flour
    750 g sugar
    Starch

    Knead flour, salt and a glass of water to a dough. Fold dough and knead again. Cover with a damp cloth and leave for some time.

    Divide dough into 8-10 pieces. Spread starch on it and roll out as thin as possible. Place half of it into a pan, pouring margarine on each layer. Spread walnuts evenly on it and place the remaining layers with margarine between one upon the other. Cut into squares. Pour the remaining margarine evenly on the baklava. Bake in medium hot oven for about an hour.

    In the meantime put sugar in a saucepan, cover with water, add one tablespoon lemon juice and boil to a heavy syrup. Pour it upon the lukewarm baklava, a little at a time, so that baklava absorbs the entire syrup. Serve cold.

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    Roasted Chestnuts & Corn On The Cob

    by Donna_in_India Written Aug 19, 2009

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    Misir (Corn) & Kestanes (Chestnuts)

    Of course, while in Turkey you must try some of the many street foods. After first having simits, and then tea, we came upon this vendor and decided to try the kestanes (chestnuts). This was one thing I had never tried on a NYC winter's street but decided to give it a try in Istanbul. It was not for me - found the texture a little strange. Was too full to try the misir (corn on the cob), which I know I would have enjoyed!

    The misir was 1.50 TL and the kestanes were 5 TL for 150g.

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    PANCAKES

    by balhannah Updated Aug 6, 2009

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    A nice filling meal I had one evening, was a Savoury Pancake.
    I had Lamb, and it was filled with capsicum, mushrooms and other vegetables as well as the Lamb. It was served folded on my plate, (a big pancake) and with potato chips and some salad, plus bread as well. It was very filling, and nice, and cost only 11t/l
    I couldn't eat it all it was so big!

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    Head food!!

    by balhannah Written Jul 31, 2009

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    Food vendor

    This was a Country where I didn't expect to see vendors carrying food for sale on their heads.
    Mainly, it was the type in the photo, and some when I was sitting beside the sea, carried a stool, which pulled apart so they could sit their tray of food on it. Clever!
    I did notice, that they have a hollow round that they sit on their head before putting the tray on it.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Roasted Chestnuts

    by Martin_S. Written Jan 15, 2009

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    Roasted Chestnut seller, Istanbul, Turkey

    While maybe not a "local" custom as such, seeing roasting chestnuts was not something that we are used to in Israel, so for us trying them was a mini adventure. You can find them on all the corners of the city and it costs only a few YTL for 100 grams or you can ask for a larger package. It was fun eating this finger food as we walked the cool autumn streets of Istanbul.

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    "Kumpi", the local fast food is great

    by Martin_S. Updated Dec 30, 2008

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    Martin with Kumpi, Istanbul, Turkey
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    The Kumpi is a fantastic "fast food" in Istanbul. In the first photo you can see me with two portions (yes one is for the wife). The Kumpi is very simply a baked potato, but not a simple potato, it is a HUGE potato, had never seen any like this...
    The second photo shows a closeup of what a Kumpi looks like with some of the "mixings". Basically they slice the potato in half, then dig out the inner flesh of the potato, mix it with butter and then replace it in the skin. Then you fill the resulting "V" shape with just about anything you want, up to, but not, including the kitchen sink...
    Some of the various "toppings" were sauerkraut, onions, mayonaise, peas&carrots, mustard, sliced hotdogs, tomatos, cream cheese, pickles...and, and, and. They had an entire showcase full of options. YOU pick and choose or just put them ALL, its up to you.
    This made for a surprisingly delicious meal, enjoy.

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    Elit Chocolate, a must bite for sure

    by Martin_S. Written Dec 28, 2008

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    Elit Chocolate, Istanbul, Turkey

    If you happen to like sweet things or chocolate, then give the Elit Chocolate that we "found" on Istiklal Street a try. We saw people lining up to purchase here so we naturally went to take a look. We found small to medium sized packs of chocolate wrapped in aluminum foil without any other packaging. We tried several kinds and enjoyed them all. Just look for a small corner kiosk with foil wrapped items in the front, that will be the chocolate.

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