the Roman Aqueduct, Istanbul

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  • Valens Aqueduct, Istanbul, TR
    Valens Aqueduct, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Valens Aqueduct, Istanbul, TR
    Valens Aqueduct, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Valens Aqueduct, Istanbul, TR
    Valens Aqueduct, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Valens Aqueduct, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Written Apr 29, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Valens Aqueduct, Istanbul, TR
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    The Valens Aqueduct (Bozdogan Kemeri) is a Roman aqueduct which was the major water-providing system of the Eastern Roman capital of Constantinople (modern Istanbul, Turkey). Completed by Roman Emperor Valens in the late 4th century AD, it was restored by several Ottoman Sultans and is one of the most important landmarks of the city.

    The aqueduct stands in Istanbul, in the quarter of Fatih and spans the valley between the hills occupied today by the Istanbul University and the Fatih Mosque. The surviving section is 921 metres long, about 50 metres less than the original length. The Ataturk Bulvarı boulevard passes under its arches.

    After the Fall of Constantinople (1453), Sultan Mehmet II repaired the whole water supply, which was then used to bring water to the imperial palaces of Eski Sarayi (the first palace, built on the third hill) and Topkapı Sarayi and connected it with a new line coming from the northeast. The great earthquake of 1509 destroyed the arches near the Mosque of Sehzade, which was erected some time later. This gave rise to the popular legend that they were cut, in order to allow a better view from the nearby mosque. The repairs to the water-supplying net continued under Beyazid II, who added a new line.

    Around the middle of the 16th century, Suleyman I rebuilt arches 47 up to 51 (counted from the west) near the Sehzade Mosque, and commissioned the Imperial Architect Mimar Sinan to add two more lines, coming from the Forest of Belgrade (Belgrad Ormanı).

    The increased flow allowed the distribution of water to the Kιrkcesme quarter, situated along the aqueduct on the Golden Horn side and so called after the many fountains built there under Suleyman.

    Nowadays the Municipality is working about a new plan to open the upper part of those huge walls for the pedestrians sothat citizens and tourists can walk on and see the perfect view of the Golden Horn from this very high up point. As all are set and properly secured, its hoped that within this year this project will come alive .... :)

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  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    The Aqueduct of Valens

    by Paul2001 Updated May 20, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Aqueduct of Valens

    The Aqueduct of Valens in just a short walk southeast of the Faith Camii. By no means is it one of the great remaining Roman aqueducts in existance but it is still pretty impressive. It stretches for about 500m and is flanked on one side by leafy parks. The aqueduct soars over the trees here. It was built in the 4th century A.D. and the Byzantine emperor Justinian the Great added a second tier in the 6th century. The aqueduct was used for transporting water between two hills to a cistern in Beyazit Square for more than 1500 years.

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  • Lalique's Profile Photo

    AQUEDUC VALENTA (near Ataturk...

    by Lalique Updated Feb 6, 2003

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    AQUEDUC VALENTA (near Ataturk Av. and Sahsade mosque) - a small part left of what was really huge construction, but still it impresses..... especially I liked the view thru the archs over the city...

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  • tini58de's Profile Photo

    the Aqueduct

    by tini58de Written Aug 26, 2002

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    the aqueduct

    the aqueduct - a water pipeline dating back to the 4th century A.D. - unfortunately we did not find a way up!!!

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