Besiktas District, Istanbul

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  • View towards Beşiktaş.
    View towards Beşiktaş.
    by IreneMcKay
  • View over former training ground of Beşiktaş F.C.
    View over former training ground of...
    by IreneMcKay
  • Besiktas
    Besiktas
    by H-TownJourneyman
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    The Father of Turkey

    by caffeine_induced78 Written Mar 27, 2004

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    If you see a statue rising above the ground in the Istanbul area, you should put money on it that it's Kemal Ataturk. After expelling the Greeks from Anatolia during the Turkish war for Independence (1920-1922) he took on the massive task of reorganizing and modernizing Turkish society. A Constitution was adopted in 1924 and Islam ceased to be the state religion in 1928. Through the realization of many of his visions Turkey has become a bridge between Western and Eastern nations.

    Statues, posters, postcards, on your money. Ataturk is everywhere.

    he's looking over you.
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    Barbaros Park

    by H-TownJourneyman Updated Feb 7, 2007

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    Barbaros Hayreddin Pasa was a famous Ottoman sea admiral during the early 16th century. For over 40 years he established Turkish naval dominance in the Mediterranean, sacking and taking over many islands and cities along the sea. He was made Governor of Algiers in 1532 after the Ottomans gained control over North Africa from the Spanish & Italians. Until he retired in 1545, Barbaros, or Barbarossa (Redbeard) as he was known in Europe, was one of the most feared seaman in Europe and the Mediterranean. He spent his last days in his private palace in present-day Besiktas, before dying in 1546. Barbaros Park, located along the Bosphorus in Besiktas, is a tribute to one of the Turk's greatest heros. There is a large statue honoring him, along with many canons lining the perimeter of the park. His mausoleum is also located here, right in front of where the busy Barbaros Avenue begins.

    Barbaros Hayreddin Pasa Monument
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    Besiktas

    by H-TownJourneyman Updated Feb 7, 2007

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    Besiktas, pronounced "Beshiktash", is a lively district of Istanbul along the Bosphorus, just up from Dolmabahçe Palace. The area has long been a place for settlement. The Byzantines had a summer palace and several churches here, but being located outside of the walls of Constantinople, it was often raided, and very little remains of this period. After the Ottomans established control over the region, the Bosphorus, including Besiktas, was freed of the risk of raids. They constructed many buildings, mosques, and even several palaces here.
    Present-day Besiktas has become a bustling area of the city. With a ferry launch, as well as a bus terminal being located here, at times Besiktas can be down right packed full of people. There are many bars & restaurants in the area, and quite a few spots for shopping. I actually found some good deals on clothes and a pair of shoes here. For museum buffs, the Turkish Naval Museum and the Painting & Scuptures Museum are in Besiktas. And around the square, there are monuments to Atatürk, father of the Turkish Republic, and Barbaros Hayreddin Pasa, a famous Ottoman naval admiral who made his home here in the 16th cent.

    Atat��rk & The Republic Monument - Besiktas Square Besiktas Ortabah��e Caddesi - Besiktas
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    Besiktas

    by Birsen Written Feb 27, 2006

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    Besiktas is very important location to reach the other part of the city. Barbaros Hayrettin Pasa Port is very convinient for you to take to asian part ( Uskudar). It is close to Dolmabahce Palace, Ortakoy also.

    Besiktas stands on the water's edge just beyond Dolmabahce Palace. Its present name means cradle stone, of doubtful origin, though one colorful tale attributes it to a stone that was brought here. The Byzantine Emperors had a palace here, and so too did later Ottoman Sultans, in particular Selim III whose beautiful wooden palace was replaced by his cousin Mahmut II with a grandiose marble edifice.

    Along the waterfront, is the Painting and Sculpture Museum. In it are Turkish paintings and sculptures of the 19th and 20th centuries. The Maritime Museum includes a range of navigational instruments, ships figureheads, arms, uniforms, models, paintings and memorabilia.

    On the other side of the road is Sinan Pasa Mosque built by his namesake, the architect Sinan. Sinan Pasa became Grand Admiral four years after Barbaros death.

    Ciragan Palace, the palace of illuminations, stands on the edge of the Bosphorus about 500 meters from Besiktas. It was yet another work of the Balyan family, designed by Nigogos and built by Sarkis for Sultan Abdul Aziz, and completed in 1874. Behind and beyond Ciragan Palace, the trees of Yildiz Park occupy the slope.

    Besiktas Iskelesi ( port)
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    Beşiktaş and Dolmabahçe Palace.

    by IreneMcKay Updated Oct 2, 2014

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    Beşiktaş is pronounced Beshiktash. It is an area on the European shores of the Bosphorus. Its name literally means Beşik = cradle, taş = stone, so Beşiktaş = cradle stone. This name comes from a legend that the stone on which the baby Jesus was placed in the stable at Bethlehem was brought here. A church was supposedly built to house the stone. Then later this stone was moved to Haghia Sophia, from where it was stolen during the fourth crusade.

    On my third year of living on the Asian side of Istanbul I passed through Beşiktaş on my commute to work every day. It was a place I quite liked. It is a transport hub with an important bus station and a ferry terminal.

    My football mad husband wanted to support a local team in Istanbul and became a firm Beşiktaş supporter. He chose them rather than either of the other two teams (Fenerbahçe or Galatasaray) because they had an English manager - Gordon Milne and some English players such as Les Ferdinand. They even had one player, Alan Walsh, who used to play for Walsall - my husband's team. Beşiktaş's colours are black and white. Their symbol is an eagle and their players chant En Büyük Beşiktaş which means Beşiktaş are the biggest or greatest or best.

    I have no photos of the Beşiktaş area but the flat we lived in in our last year in Istanbul overlooked their training ground, so I will add this as the photo for this tip.

    Historically Beşiktaş was an isolated village on the shores of the Bosphorus outside the walls of Constantinople, as such it was vulnerable to attacks. During Ottoman Times, the Sultans established control over the Bosphorus and life became safer and more stable in Bosphorus villages. Beşiktaş became an established Bosphorus crossing area for trading caravans travelling to Anatolia or along the Silk Road.

    Beşiktaş has a monument to Barbarossa or Red Beard who supposedly once had a palace there. Zübeyde Hanım, the mother of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, once lived in Beşiktaş

    Beşiktaş is also the home of Dolmabahçe Palace and the Naval Museum. I visited Dolmabahçe Palace a couple of times, but either did not take photos or do not know where they are. Actually, I don't think cameras were allowed inside in those days.

    Dolmabahçe means filled in garden, as the palace and garden are built on reclaimed land. Dolmabahçe Palace was built between 1843 and 1856, during the reign of Sultan Abdülmecid I. Before that the Sultans had always lived in Topkapı Palace, but that was getting uncomfortable and had not been modernized, so at great expense, Abdülmecid decided to build a new modern palace in Beşiktaş. Hacı Said Ağa was responsible for the construction of the palace. Garabet Balyan, his son Nigoğayos Balyan and Evanis Kalfa were the palace architects.

    The last royal to live in Dolmabahçe Palace was Caliph Abdülmecid Efendi. In 1924 ownership of the palace was transferred to the new Turkish Republic. Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the founder of the new Turkish Republic, used the palace as his residence during the summers. He carried out some of his most important works here. He died here on November 10th, 1938. All the clocks in the palace were stopped at 9.05, the time of his death.

    Dolmabahçe is the largest palace in Turkey. It occupies an area of 11.2 acres. It has 285 rooms, 46 halls, 6 baths and 68 toilets. The interior is decorated with gold leaf and crystal. In the Ceremonial Hall of the palace you can see the world's largest Bohemian crystal chandelier which was a gift to the sultans from Queen Victoria. The palace has also got several fine paintings, a collection of bearskin rugs presented to the sultans by Tsar Nicholas I of Russia and some splendid Turkish carpets. The palace has a harem where the sultan's mother, wives, concubines and children would have lived.

    View over former training ground of Beşiktaş F.C. View towards Beşiktaş.
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