Chora Church Museum - Kariye, Istanbul

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  • Chora Church Museum - Kariye
    by magor65
  • Chora Church Museum - Kariye
    by magor65
  • Chora Church Museum - Kariye
    by magor65
  • luiggi's Profile Photo

    Chora Church

    by luiggi Written Mar 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chora Church

    Chora Church (Kariye Camii in Turkish) is the most interesting Byzantine church after Hagia Sophia in Istanbul. The importance of the church does not come from the building itself , the frescoes and the mosaics are superb and reflect the magnificient heritage of Byzantine Art. The Chora Church Museum is open every day from 9 a.m to 4:30 p.m except Wed.

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  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    The St. Savior in Chora Church (Kariye Camii)

    by Paul2001 Written Feb 4, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The St. Savior in Chora Church (Kariye Camii)
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    The Chora Church, which today is known at the Kariye Camii, is one those monuments that bus groups frequent and justifably so. There has been a church here since the 4th century but the present building dates from 11th century. In the 14th century the interior of the church was restored by Theodore Metochites, Grand Logothete of the Treasury. It was under his patronage that the magnificent mosaics where created that adorn the interior walls and ceiling of the church. It is these mosaics that bring in the hordes of tourists that flock to the church.
    The church was converted into a mosque by the Turks after they captured the city in 1453. As they did in the Aga Sofia, the place plaster all over the mosaics, hence covering them up for nearly 500 years. In the 1940's two American archeologists uncovered the mosaics and the Turkish government turned the place into a museum in 1947.
    The images recreated in the mosaics depict scenes in the Life of Christ and stories from the Life of the Virgin Mary. Today they are considered to be amongst the most important such mosaics created during the Byzantine era.
    I walked along the famous walls that at one time defended Istanbul before heading towards the Chora Church. It is easy to find because of the towering minerat that was built by the Turks. The neighborhood is not the nicest in Istanbul but relatively safe.
    The museum is open 9:30am to 6pm and it cost $7.00 to visit

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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  • ani_istanbul's Profile Photo

    Chora Museum

    by ani_istanbul Written Sep 16, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Beautiful Chora mosaics and frescoes from the last period of Byzantine painting...I have been to the Church twice...I had seen there in my dream before I had visited so it is one of the important places in Istanbul for me...You will love the square front of the church as well
    Open everyday except Wednesdays between 09.30-16.00

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  • Kariye Museum (Church of St Saviour in Chora)

    by stephenshephard Written Oct 27, 2003
    Christ Pantocrator mosaic, Kariye, Istanbul

    Kariye Museum was Kariye Camii (mosque) and before that the Church of St Saviour in Chora. Chora means 'in the country' because the original church was built outside the city limits of Constantinople. The city grew and the site and the various incarnations of the church on it have been just inside the walls since 413 AD.

    From the outside it is a pretty little Byzantine church. Inside it is stunning, filled with beautiful, beautiful mosaics and frescoes, dating from the 14th century, the last decades of the Eastern Roman Empire. When the church was converted to a mosque after the Ottoman invasion, they had to be obliterated, images of people being forbidden by Islam. However unlike the Byzantine iconoclasm hundreds of years earlier, the images were not destroyed, merely covered in plaster, and once the mosque was converted into a museum they were revealed again.

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    • Arts and Culture
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  • hadrian's Profile Photo

    St Savior from Chora Church - Karyie Camii II

    by hadrian Written Oct 18, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mosaics

    The nowadays building dates from the XIth century and was restored between 1315-1321 by the theologian and philosopher Theodor Metochites, prime minister and first lord of treasury, one of the important representatives of the Byzantine elite. In the interior narthex, upon the nave’s door, there is Metochites with a big turban, humbly dedicating the church to the Christ.
    Here you can find some of the most beautiful Byzantine mosaics and frescoes. A really MUST SEE!!!!*.
    Through mosaics and frescoes, you can see how “ God made himself man for bringing redemption to the mankind “: The Christ’s Genealogy, Christ’s Childhood, the Life of Holly Virgin, the Wonders of Christ.
    ( it is open from Thursday to Tuesday, between 9.00-16.00, the entrace fee is 10.000.000 TL and you can take picture but without blitz, if you use it, you will be very polite invite to leave the church, and because the guardians are not present all time, people use the blitz unfortunately, which will end in the near future that taking photos will be forbidden. It is located in Fener, from Edirnekapi, go few meters on Fevzi Pasa Caddesi and take left on the first street called Hocacakir Caddesi, which streches forward along the Theodosian’s walls. Than take right on the first street called Karyie Bostani which will lead you directly to the church)

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  • hadrian's Profile Photo

    St Savior from Chora Church - Karyie Camii

    by hadrian Written Oct 18, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St Savior from Chora Church

    Only the church, the center of a Byzantine monastery complex, survived. It was converted into a mosque after 1453. From 1948 it is a museum where were left no Islamic element, except the minaret.
    The Greek word “Chora” refers to countryside. Taking in consideration the perimeter of the Constantine’s walls, the building was located out of the city which means that the originally building could it be possibly built around 4th century AD
    ( it is open from Thursday to Tuesday, between 9.00-16.00, the entrace fee is 10.000.000 TL and you can take picture but without blitz, if you use it, you will be very polite invite to leave the church, and because the guardians are not present all time, people use the blitz unfortunately, which will end in the near future that taking photos will be forbidden. It is located in Fener, from Edirnekapi, go few meters on Fevzi Pasa Caddesi and take left on the first street called Hocacakir Caddesi, which streches forward along the Theodosian’s walls. Than take right on the first street called Karyie Bostani which will lead you directly to the church)

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    • Arts and Culture

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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Cora church and museum

    by SirRichard Written May 14, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Some frescoes

    This old byzantine orthodox church is now a museum in which you can admire the beautiful frescoes and mosaics in its walls and domes.
    Entrance: 6 euros. No flash allowed inside. Located near the Edirne Kapi, close to the City Walls.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    One of the Greatest Paintings in the World

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Anastasis, Kariye Camii

    The Anastasis, depicting Christ dominant over Satan in chains and opening the tombs of Adam and Eve, is one of the most astonishing and important works of art in the whole of Europe. Unfortunately, it is not bathed in good lighting. For this you must hold your breath, set your camera to the proper exposure, and keep perfectly still by leaning against the wall. There is no more dramatic Christian image from the time of the emperors in all Istanbul.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Mosaics - Unlike Anything Else in Istanbul

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Christ Pantocrator inside the entrance

    Kariye Camii has the best collection of mosaics and early Christian artwork in the entire city, Saint Sophia included. Almost every square foot of this tiny structure seems to be adorned with Christian paintings or mosaics. My photographs do not do the place justice. Try to keep extremely still on your timed exposures. The museum wisely does not allow flash photography.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Let the Light Shine Through

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    religious panel near the window

    Obviously, where the windows are is where you'll get your best photos -- if the niche contains any artwork. Some of the best work is situated in a difficult niche or bay that often strains the neck. Trying with a lens is even more difficult.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Every Niche and Hollow

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Christian mosaics, Kariye Camii

    More Christian artwork inside the museum. Certain relics are difficult to set up for a photo, while others which offer more room to manuever do not enjoy enough light for a timed exposure. Try to visit often and note what hours the sun enters the windows.

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Within These Halls

    by mrclay2000 Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    flying buttresses, Kariye Camii

    Before we step inside, check out the flying buttresses around the backside, the only ones I know of in former Constantinople. Given the mosque's size, I hardly see that such supports are necessary, except when you recall the frequency of devastating earthquakes to this region.

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  • worldkiwi's Profile Photo

    Visit the Mosaics Museum.

    by worldkiwi Written Sep 12, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Inside the mosaics museum.

    The mosaics are stunning. Many have been moved from other sites in a painstaking process. The colours and designs range from the geometric to the fanciful (dragons and griffins). It really is very impressive.

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    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology

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  • grrl_travel's Profile Photo

    Kariye Camii (Church of the...

    by grrl_travel Written Sep 7, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kariye Camii (Church of the Chora).

    A mosque of tile mosaics. Just beautiful.

    From the Byzantine Architecture Project:

    'Described by Osterhaut as 'second in renown only to Hagia Sophia among the Byzantine churches of Istanbul', Kariye Camii attracts much attention because of its rich mosaics and frescoes. The original structure was built by the Holy Theodus in 534 in the reign of Justinian. In the 11th and 12th century, it was rebuilt by the Comnenus family and dedicated to Christ (thus the name, Christ in Chora). The structure suffered the great earthquake of 1296 and was later converted into a mosque in 1511 after the Turks conquered Istanbul. Since 1948, the building has been the Kariye Museum, a popular tourist attraction.'

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Kariye Muzesi (Chora Church)

    by leffe3 Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    11th century Byzantine Church (which also served for 400 years as a Mosque) close to the ancient city walls (the original 3rd century church was outside the city limits until it fell 'victim' to Byzantine urban sprawl in the 5th century). The church/museum is known for its absolutely stunning mosiacs and murals from the 14th century and is an absolute must see whilst in Istanbul.

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