Constantine Column, Istanbul

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  • Cermberlitas
    Cermberlitas
    by Jim_Eliason
  • Constantine's Column
    Constantine's Column
    by Mikebb
  • Column of Constantine
    Column of Constantine
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Constantine's Column

    by Mikebb Updated Mar 9, 2012

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    Constantine's Column

    Built in the year 330 AD this column has outlasted the various conquests of Istanbul and as it stands today at 35 metres (115ft) it is a good landmark for tourists travelling by light rail to visit the Grand Bazaar. It is here that you leave the light rail and take the short walk to the Grand Bazaar.

    The column was constructed on the orders of the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great to commemorate the declaration of Byzantium as the new Capital City of the Roman Empire.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Column of Constantine

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 9, 2009

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    Column of Constantine

    The Column of Constantine is a monumental column constructed on the orders of the Roman emperor Constantine the Great in 330 AD. It commemorates the declaration of Byzantium (renamed by Constantine as Nova Roma) as the new capital city of the Roman Empire.
    As of 2007 the column is being restored by the Istanbul Municipality and the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, and is surrounded by iron bars for the restoration work.

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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Constantine Column

    by SirRichard Written May 8, 2003

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    The column and Bayazit

    This huge isolated column in Yeniceriler Cad (at the end of Divan Yolu) was burnt in a fire in 1779 (that’s why it looks blackish). It’s also called Cemberlitas (column of the Circles) and it gives name to the baths behind and the tram stop. Was erected by Constantine in 330ad and had a statue of the emperor. The metal circles were added afterwards.

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  • Lion_Beat's Profile Photo

    The Burnt Column - Cemberlitash

    by Lion_Beat Updated Mar 2, 2003

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    Cemberlitas

    Cemberlitas. (in turkish: cember-circle; tas - stone) or also known as Costantine's Column.

    As I heard some guides are telling that it's the only column left from one big building, and if it's so big can you imagine how big should've been the buiding. But that of course is not true and most probably take it's origin from one of old stories.

    The column was erected on 11 of May 330AD by Constantine The Great to inaugurate the new Byzantine capital. It's made of porphyry brought from Heliopolis, Egypt.
    The column was made of ten blocks linked by bronze rings (50 m. - hight): it supported a statue of the emperor. Earthquakes and fires have greatly damaged the column and only six blocks are left. Because the column was fired quite lots of times the europeans also called it 'The Burnt Column'.

    Since 1968 it is supposed that under the column there are parts of cross on which Jesus Christ was crucified. That statement was made by Sevket Rado who researched a book from 17th century. It is believed that Constantine's mother - Helena, brought the parts of the cross from Jerusalem.
    And it's a fact that on top blocks of the column was the description in pictures of the birth of Jesus Christ.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    The Constantine Oblisque

    by Martin_S. Written Dec 28, 2008

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    Constantine Oblisk, Istanbul, Turkey

    What I found out about the Constantine Oblisque (Column) was:
    The landmark of the city because of its height of 32 meters. The column was erected in the fourth century by Constantine the Great. This monument was completely covered with bronze plates.During the Latin invasion in 1204, these plaques were removed and melted to make coins.
    What you see is a very simple, apparently pockmarked column, very underimpressive today. There are no explanations at the site itself, when we saw the column we were not sure it was the same that was spoken of in our guides.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Burnt Column

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2010

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    Originally known as the Column of Constantine, this monumental column was constructed on the orders of the Roman emperor Constantine the Great in 330 AD. It commemorates the declaration of Byzantium (renamed by Constantine as Nova Roma) as the new capital city of the Roman Empire.

    In Constantine's day the column was at the centre of the Forum of Constantine (today known as Cemberlitas Square), an oval forum situated outside the city walls in the vicinity of what may have been the west gate of Antoninia. On its erection, the column was 50 meters tall, constructed of nine cylindrical porphyry blocks surmounted by a statue of Constantine in the figure of Apollo. However, a strong gale, earthquakes and a fire (in 1779) have destroyed it to leave it 35 meters tall with black scorch marks, earning it the name 'Burnt Column'. Restoration work has been going on since 1955!

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    The Constantine Column

    by viddra Written Apr 12, 2007

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    constantine column

    It was built by Emperor Constantine VII in the 10th century.

    It’s 32m high and was covered with embroidered copper and brass plates that were removed during the Latin invasion in the 13th century. Coins were made out of these plates.

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  • toshigiappone's Profile Photo

    Cemberlitas (Column of Constantine)

    by toshigiappone Written May 3, 2005

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    Cemberlitas

    Near the Cemberlitas tram stop, and although there are many people here, Cemberlitas is one of the oldest monument in Istanbul. It was erected in 330 by Constantine the Great to celebrate the new city named after him. At that time here was Forum of Constantine, and there was a statue of Constantine himself on the top of the column. However, in 1106 its statue was taken from the top, and then in 1779 damaged by fire. So, what we can see has a black colour.

    Probably, you have at least one chance to see it.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Çemberlitaş Sütunu

    by MM212 Updated Feb 25, 2010

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    Column of Constantine - Jan 2010
    1 more image

    Erected in 330 AD by Emperor Constantine, this monumental column inaugurated Byzantium as Nova Roma, the new capital of the Roman Empire. It is known as the Column of Constantine in the western world, but its Turkish name, Çemberlitaş Sütunu, means "Hooped Stone" Column, in reference to the supporting hoops placed around its length after a 5th century earthquake. When it was erected, the column stood at the centre of the Roman Forum of Byzantium, and in its original design, was topped by a Corinthian capital on which stood a statue of Emperor Constantine in the form of the god Apollo. The statue fell in a storm in the 11th century, but was subsequently replaced by a cross, which was ultimately removed after the conquest of the city by the Ottomans. The column is located near the south-east corner of the Grand Bazaar, in an area now also known as Çemberlitaş.

    [Note that Çemberlitaş is pronounced "tshember-li-tash"]

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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    The Constantine Column

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Jun 15, 2011
    The Constantine Column - Istanbul

    The Constantine Column was erected in the year 330 to commemorate the transfer of the seat of the Roman Empire from Rome to Istanbul during the reign of Constantine the Great.

    Today’s column is smaller than the original pillar. Its marble crests were added in the 12th Century and the reinforcements at its bottom in the 18th Century.

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  • Huks's Profile Photo

    Symbol of Conantinopol

    by Huks Written Oct 6, 2011
    Column of Constantine

    This column was erected in honor of Byzantium (so was then called the city), becoming the capital of the Roman Empire. Now, this column even really does not fit well in that place and looks not very good. However, remember that in the past at the top of this column was a statue of Constantine and the column itself was in the large square in front of the Senate. Then the column was a completely different look and meaning.

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Cermberlitas

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Apr 15, 2012

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    Cermberlitas
    1 more image

    Remains of a column erected by Constantine to celebrate the naming of Constantinople as capital of the Roman Empire

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