Egyptian Obelisk, Istanbul

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  • Obelisk of Theodosius, Istanbul, TR
    Obelisk of Theodosius, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Obelisk of Theodosius, Istanbul, TR
    Obelisk of Theodosius, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Obelisk of Theodosius, Istanbul, TR
    Obelisk of Theodosius, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Obelisk of Theodosius, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Updated May 20, 2013
    Obelisk of Theodosius, Istanbul, TR
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    The Obelisk of Theodosius (Dikilitas) is the Ancient Egyptian obelisk of Pharaoh Tutmoses III re-erected at the Sultanahmet Square in Istanbul by the Roman emperor Theodosius I in the 4th century AD.

    The marble pedestal had bas-reliefs dating to the time of the obelisk's re-erection in Constantinople. On one face Theodosius I is shown offering the crown of victory to the winner in the chariot races, framed between arches and Corinthian columns, with happy spectators, musicians and dancers assisting in the ceremony. In the bottom right of this scene is the water organ of Ctesibius and on the left another instrument.

    There are obvious traces of major damage to the pedestal and energetic restoration of it. Missing pieces have been replaced, at the pedestal's bottom corners, by cubes of porphyry resting on the bronze cubes already mentioned - the bronze and porphyry cubes are of identical form and dimensions. There is also a vertical gash up one of the obelisk's faces, which look like a canal from above. These repairs to the base may be linked to the cracking of the obelisk itself after its suffering a serious accident (perhaps an earthquake) at an unknown date in antiquity.

    Its next to the Sultanahmet Mosque and 5 mins walk to Hagia Sophia ....

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Egyptian Obelisk (Obelisk of Theodosius)

    by Ewingjr98 Written Apr 23, 2011

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    The Egyptian tower at the Hippodrome in historic Istanbul is the obelisk of Pharaoh Tutmoses III. It was constructed in Egypt of red granite from Aswan by Thutmose III to commemorate his wartime victory in 1450 BC. In 357AD the obelisk, along with another from the same location, was moved to Alexandria, Egypt to commemorate Roman Emperor Constantius II's 20th year as leader. In 390 Theodosius I had the obelisk moved to Constantinople and placed on a marble pedestal, where it remains to this day. The other obelisk in Alexandria is now in Rome.

    The obelisk was originally nearly 100 feet tall, but the bottom section was lost and only the top 60 feet remain.

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    Egyptian Obelisk a.k.a Obelisk of Theodosius

    by Arkeolog Written Apr 1, 2009

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    The most remarkable monument here is undoubtedly the Egyptian obelisk inscribed with hieroglyphs. This magnificent obelisk was originally erected before a temple at Karnak in 1450 B.C.E. Egyptian obelisks were transported to Rome, along with the monuments of other civilizations, as result of the Roman desire to demonstrate their power. Accordingly, Constantine I commanded that ancient monuments also be erected in the city for purposes of beautification. The obelisk is named after Emperor Theodosius the Great, who erected it in the center of the Hippodrome in 390 C.E. Bearing reliefs on all four faces, the bronze sphere at the top fell in the earthquake of 865 and was never restored. The inscription reveals that it was dedicated by Thutmose III an 18 generation descendant of the god Amon thanking him for the wealth, power, talent and sunlight that he showered on the earth. The obelisk stands on a base which also bears reliefs on four sides. The subject of the reliefs on the upper part of the base features Theodosius I at the Hippodrome while those in the lower section depict the actual erection of the obelisk, with the hauling and raising of the stone by the use of ropes. The two inscriptions one in Greek, the other in Latin, indicate that the erection of the obelisk occupied a total of 30 days. The obelisk, a witness over the centuries to various riots, wars, fires, and celebrations, was described as a charm protecting the safety of the city by the 17th-century Ottoman writer Evliya Çelebi.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Egyptian Oblisk (Column)

    by Martin_S. Written Dec 28, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Egyptian Oblisk, Istanbul, Turkey

    The Egyptian Oblisk is also known as the Obelisk of Theodosius. What I found on the internet was: Erected by Tutmosis III 1504-1450 B.C. before the temple of Karnak at Heliopolis. The Obelisk, brought to Istanbul by Emperor Theodosius I was made of pink granite and its height is 17 metres. Originally, the obelýsk was 27 meters in height ,10 meters hýgher than it ýs today and weýghed 800 tons.It is unknown when and how the lower part disappeared.
    The hieroglyphic inscription on the Obelisk describes the victory of the pharaoh and a sacrifice to the god of the sun Amon-Ra in which the pharaoh kneels at the foot of the god.
    The Obelisk was brought to Constantinopolis in 390 A.D. and stood over a rectangular stone base on four bronze feet. Its marble base in itself is six meters. There are inscriptions in Latin and Greek on it.
    As they say the base has "gone missing" and it sits today on a partial base that gives you the feeling that it may fall over at the slightest gust of wind.

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Egyptian Obelisk

    by traveloturc Updated Nov 19, 2008

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    this is me !!!

    Around 1490 BC the Egyptian Pharaoh Thutmose III erected two obelisks before the Karnak temple in Luxor to commemorate the victories of his forces in Mesopotamia. The obelisks were made of rare pink granite. In the 4th century AD, an unknown Roman emperor who wanted to accomplish something impressive that would create excitement among his people had the colossal obelisk brought to Istanbul. For years it was left lying in a corner of the Hippodrome. In 390, during the reign of Theodosius I, it was erected with great difficulty by Proclus, a city administrator. It is the oldest monument in the city and has always been considered magical. The obelisk rests on four bronze blocks on a Roman base decorated with reliefs. These depict the emperor, his children and other prominent personalities watching the races from the imperial box, as well as the spectators, musicians, dancers and chariot races. The obelisk measures 25.60 m including the base.By the way this Obelisk is in better conditions comparing the obelisk of Place Concorde in Paris

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Egyptian Obelisk

    by MikeAtSea Written Oct 6, 2008

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    The Egyptian Obelisk that one can find within the remains of the Hippodrome was built in 1500 BC and originally stood outside Luxor until Constantine brought it to this city. This beautiful carved monument was broken and is probably only one third of its original height. It stands on a base that was created in the 4th century AD, showing Theodosius I and his family in the kathisma watching events.

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  • shrimp56's Profile Photo

    The Egyptian Obelisk

    by shrimp56 Updated Jan 23, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Egyptian obelisk in Istanbul

    This obelisk dates from 1500 BCE -- Emperor Theodosius I bought it back from Luxor in BCE 390. It has survived many earthquakes, but had 40% of the bottom trimmed off for transporting to its present site.!The stone is pink granite.

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