Egyptian (Spice) Market, Istanbul

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  • Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR
    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR
    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR
    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Not just spices...

    by Donna_in_India Updated Mar 16, 2014

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    Belly dancing costumes, Spice Bazaar, Istanbul
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    At the south end of the Galata Bridge, next to the Yeni Camii (New Mosque) is the main entrance to the Spice Bazaar, also known as the Egyptian Bazaar or Misir Carsisi. The bazaar is one of the oldest in Istanbul and the second largest covered bazaar in the city. It was originally built (17th century) to generate rental income for the upkeep of the Yeni Camii.

    It seemed most stalls did not sell spices but this bazaar was and is still considered the center for spice trade in Istanbul. The stalls that did have spices had neat cones of colorful spices (chili, saffron, turmeric, etc.). Those same stalls usually sold several kinds of tea as well. Some of the most interesting stalls sold Turkish sweets, honey, nuts and dried fruits. Many stalls sold belly dancing outfits, clothes, household goods, and souvenirs.

    The layout of the bazaar is an L-shape with 88 vaulted rooms. The narrow lanes are very crowded and it is easy to get swept out of the Spice Bazaar into the local markets (outside) surrounding the bazaar. (We walked around there for a while and it was interesting to note that the market was set up in sections: clothes, hardware, stationary/packing, wedding dresses, etc.)

    The Spice Bazaar was not only too crowded and hot(!) to shop, but expensive as well. I would compare prices if you want to make any purchases - and it's likely you'll need to bargain! We did find in general that things were less expensive outside than at any of the bazaars.

    Open Mon - Sat 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.

    No entry fee.

    Allow 30-60 minutes to wander, longer if you plan to shop or visit the outside markets.

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  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Updated Jun 10, 2013

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    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR
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    Spice Bazaar is one of the most colorful spots of Istanbul, which every local and tourist has to see and taste the amazing atmosphere .... :)

    "Its the second large covered bazaar in city after Grand Bazaar."

    Here you can watch my HD Video of "Spice Market" ... :
    Video

    The Spice Bazaar is an “L”-shaped building, consisting of 88 vaulted rooms, almost all of which are now divided into an upper and lower story. Monumental gateways are at the ends of both halls, with chambers above each entrance way. The main entrance is in the southwest corner, facing the Yeni Mosque.

    There are several documents suggesting the name of the bazaar was first "New Bazaar".

    The building was endowed to the foundation of the "New Mosque" and got its name because it was built with the revenues from Egypt. The word mısır has a double meaning in Turkish: "Egypt" and "maize". The bazaar was (and still is) the center for spice trade in Istanbul, but in the last years more and more shops of other type are replacing the spice shops.

    A nice place to spend time, walk around, taste the Turkish Delight offers of the vendors, have a sip of a Turkish Tea or Coffee and to enjoy the day .... :)

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  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    The Spice Bazaar / The Egyptian Bazaar

    by ValbyDK Written Jun 9, 2013
    The Spice Bazaar / The Egyptian Bazaar
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    The Spice Bazaar (or Egyptian Bazaar) opened in 1664. It is the second largest covered bazaar (after the Grand Bazaar) in Istanbul, and - like the name says - the bazaar was (and is) the center for spice trade. In the older days, many of the products sold here were imported from Egypt, and this gave the bazaar its nickname, “the Egyptian Bazaar”.

    Today you can buy almost anything inside the L-shaped bazaar. There are about 90 shops selling spices, Turkish cheese, oil, dried fruits and nuts, olives, tea, sausages, Turkish delight (lokum), jewelry, candle holders, and much more...

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  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Egyptian Spice Market

    by HORSCHECK Updated Apr 6, 2013

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    Egyptian Spice Bazaar
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    After Istanbul's Grand Bazaar, the Spice Market (Misir Carsisi) is the city's second largest covered market.

    Its history dates back to 1664 when the market was completed after 67 years of construction. At that time it was part of the New Mosque (Yeni Camii).

    Products on offer mainly include spices, dried fruits, nuts and Turkish delight (Lokum).

    Directions:
    The Egyptian Spice Market can be found in the neighbourhood of the New Mosque. Both are situated near the southern end of the Galata Bridge in Istanbul's Eminönü district.

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Spice market

    by Raimix Updated Feb 6, 2012

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    Spice market, differently, Egyptian market, is the most exotic visited markets in Istanbul, filled with a smell of spice and different food (sweets, vegetables, so on). It was built in 1664 in quite comfortable place to have a business (near Galata bridge, where a lot of passengers arrived by boats)

    Name of Egyptian market is due to fact that most of spices were imported through Egypt.

    I have bought couple of spice packs and Turkish lokum (sweets) as souvenirs.

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  • asolotraveler's Profile Photo

    Egyptian Bazaar Spice City

    by asolotraveler Written Dec 27, 2011

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    Lots of Spices
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    There are many reveiewss on the history of the Spice Bazaar, wo I will not bore you with it. I do want to share with you a tip if you are buying SAFFRON. Get ii from "Arifoglu" number 31 in the Bazaar. I personally met the young man (Teslim Sarigol) and he did right by me. I purchased 1 gram each for myself and a friend (25 lira) each but 10 USA cheaper than the 1 gram here at home. How about Scarves? Well I went to Number 61 or 65 and there was a 5 lira sale gong on and I purchased scarves that they were going out of style. Inside the very nicely furnished shop, there are gorgeous 100% Silk scarves that were a bit out of my spending realm. ( I will just have to save up for next time). I enjoyed walking around looking at all the people, though it is pretty much the same merchandise as the Grand Bazaar. I did go outside and turned left and began walking up the outside streets. That is where it is really exciting. Need a Gold fish for the kids?. They have them. How about a bunny rabbit? They are there also. The side streets are busy, but more layed back. I wound up in front of a Scarf and Jewelry Shop, that I ended up speding a small fortune, the prices were so very good. Again, beautiful scarves and Necklaces about 10 Lira. Shoppers Paradise. Have a great Time!

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  • Oriental explosion

    by Dinaelghitany Updated Sep 11, 2011

    Perfect combination with the bosphorus ride, as it is just in front of eminonu. Once you get in, the colors, the odors, and the crowds will get you in a true oriental mood. A great place for purchasing souvenirs and gifts , you have to bargain to less than 50% and don't be embarrassed, they will sell it to you especially if you want more than one piece.

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  • SurfaceTravel's Profile Photo

    Egyptian Spice Bazaar

    by SurfaceTravel Updated Sep 5, 2011

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    Egyptian Spice Bazaar
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    We found the Spice Bazaar to be far more interesting than the over-hyped Grand Bazaar. It's also a bit smaller and more manageable. There are ample shops selling pure spices where you can haggle over prices and have sample tastings. There are also fish shops and many other grocery stalls in the neighbourhood. Great photo opps.

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  • muratkorman's Profile Photo

    Spice Bazaar - Misir Çarsisi

    by muratkorman Updated May 16, 2011

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    Spices
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    Misir Çarsisi is one of the oldest bazaars in the city. Located in Eminönü, it is the second largest covered shopping complex after the Grand Bazaar. Due to the fact that many spices were imported via Egypt in the Ottoman period, the name was favoured by the public. The Spice Bazaar is an “L”-shaped building, consisting of 88 vaulted rooms, almost all of which are now divided into an upper and lower story. The bazaar is the center for spice trade in Istanbul. You can also find some special local delights and desserts. The aroma of various spices mix with each other and you feel yourself dizzy with this beautiful scent.

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  • al2401's Profile Photo

    A Touch of Spice

    by al2401 Updated Sep 14, 2010

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    Spices in the Spice Market - Istanbul
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    The Spice Bazaar also known as the Egyptian Bazaar is one of the oldest bazaars in the city. It can be found in a large L shaped building at the Eminönü end of the Galata Bridge. This market is the second largest indoor market in Istanbul after the Grand Bazaar.

    The name Egyptian Bazaar is likely to have originated during the Ottoman period, when most spices would have come from Egypt. The Turkish name is Mýsýr Çarþýsý with Misir meaning Egypt. However, it also means maize which accounts for the occasional mis-translation as Corn Bazaar.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Spice Bazaar

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 2, 2010

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    4 more images

    The Spice Bazaar, also known as the Egyptian Bazaar is the second largest covered shopping complex after the Grand Bazaar. There are several documents suggesting the name of the bazaar was first called the "New Bazaar". However, due to the fact that many spices were imported via Egypt in the Ottoman period it then acquired its current name. It was built by architect Mustafa in 1660 and consists of 88 vaulted rooms. For me, I preferred it over its bigger cousin, the Grand Bazaar, as it’s smaller and has a more personal feel. It's full of shops selling spices (naturally!), dried fruits, perfume oils, nougat, Turkish Delight, and honey.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Mısır Çarşısı

    by MM212 Updated Feb 25, 2010

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    Mısır ��arşısı - Jan 2010
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    The L-shaped covered bazaar, Mısır Çarşısı, is Istanbul's second market (pronounced "Missir Tchar-shi-si"). It was built in 1660 as part of the neighbouring Yeni Valide Camii, the New Mosque, to provide revenues to support its charitable functions. Although commonly referred to in English as the Spice Market, its original traded commodity, Mısır Çarşısı actually means "Egyptian Bazaar". It took on this name because its construction was funded by duties collected on Egyptian imports. A few shops at Mısır Çarşısı continue to sell spices, along with lokum (Turkish delight) and other delicacies, but the rest now sell all sorts of other products, not too dissimilar to Kapalıçarşı, the Grand Bazaar.

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  • Arkeolog's Profile Photo

    Spice Bazaar is a world of spices and smells

    by Arkeolog Written Apr 1, 2009

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    Spice Bazaar
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    The Spice Bazaar is definitely one of the most colourful locations in Istanbul. You can find just about anything in the Spice Bazaar including a wide variety of spices, colourful sweets, nuts and snacks that smell delightful and row upon row of dried fruits. In addition to being a must-see for local and foreign tourists, this historical marketplace is also a favourite shopping centre for residents of Istanbul.

    The Spice Bazaar is always a bustling scene of shoppers and has been a must-see destination in Istanbul for centuries. Located behind Yeni Cami (New Mosque) in Eminönü Square, this historic marketplace began to be built during the time of Sultan Mehmet III. Sultan Mehmet IV’s mother, Hatice Turhan, ordered architect Mustafa Aga to complete the Spice Bazaar, which he achieved by 1663.

    The bazaar consists of stores lined up along two long corridors and has six entrances. Stone and brick were used during construction instead of wood and the bazaar has a wooden balcony for reciting the call to prayer. In the early days, the bazaar contained mostly herb stores, but in time spice-sellers, candy sellers and stores selling health products began to open here. Herb stores did not just sell herbs, they were also a kind of health consultant for people looking for herbs to heal their illnesses or who were seeking relief with herbal concoctions. Since these store owners knew the benefits of hundreds of varieties of spices, aromatic plants, seeds and their mixtures, they were frequented by people from all walks of life including even royalty from the Ottoman palace. Herb stores did not just sell healthy herbs to people. Thy also obtained herb, root and flower extracts which they then bottled.

    Anyone who is interested can find a wide variety of spices and aromatic plants in addition to candy, Turkish delight(lokum), herbal tea and mixed spices. Foreign tourists who come here are particularly attracted to the Turkish delight in the stores. There is a wide variety including rose-hips, pistachios, walnuts and gum mastic, making it almost impossible to walk past one of these counters without having a taste of the Turkish delight. With such an exciting variety of colour, it is very difficult to turn down the Turkish delight offered by sellers for you to taste.

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  • jlanza29's Profile Photo

    Pretty cool !!!!

    by jlanza29 Written Mar 16, 2009

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    My new freind Shariff at his stall !!!!

    Ok, I must say we really didn't plan to see the Spice Market, but one night on our way to dinner we saw that it was still open, so we ventured in it, and it was unique....and just like the name says.... spices are everywhere....not as big as the Grand Baazar but big enough to take about 30 minutes in it.....all the merchants are willing to give you samples to try..again the turkish hospitality comes forth..... I asked permission to take some photos and they were more than happy too !!!!!

    If you come by and it's open venture in, but don't go out of your way to see it unless you plan to buy spices.....

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  • mikelisaanna's Profile Photo

    The Spice Bazaar

    by mikelisaanna Updated Jan 26, 2009

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    A spice vendor in Istanbul's Spice Bazaar
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    The Spice Bazaar (also known as the Egyptian Bazaar) is the second-largest bazaar (after the Grand Bazaar) in the old section of Istanbul. It traditionally served as the center of the city's spice trade, and still houses numerous vendors of a variety of spices, which you can buy in bulk or pre-packaged. Some of the vendors had very artistic displays of their spices, in which they created designs out of the different-colored spices. In addition to spice vendors, the Spice Bazaar also houses numerous food vendors, souvenir shops, and shops selling ceramics and other decorative items.

    Although it is smaller than the Grand Bazaar, we felt that the Spice Bazaar was the more crowded of the two, and also seemed to have more agressive vendors. It was fun to walk through the Spice Bazaar, but we enjoyed the Grand Bazaar more.

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