Egyptian (Spice) Market, Istanbul

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  • Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR
    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR
    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR
    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Spice Market (or Egyptian)

    by Martin_S. Updated Jan 14, 2009

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    Spice Market candies, Istanbul, Turkey
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    My wife had been to the Spice Market several years ago and she described to me the three S's of the market Sight/Sound/Smell. The Smell of the spices being the strongest and the Sight of them being the most impressive. When we visited together, she found that many of the shops that had sold spices and candies (two photos shown here) had disappeared and you found in their place shops pandering to the foreign tourist, some with jewelery of gold, but also some with "junk" items of low cost for souveniers. It is worth a visit and you can do it if you plan a walk from the Suleymaniye Mosque all the way down to the Galata Bridge.

    Even though we visited in September, a decidedly cool month we still found the streets and shops packed with people, mostly local, but with a good peppering of foreigners.

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  • cherrytomato's Profile Photo

    Egyptian (Spice) Bazar

    by cherrytomato Written Jan 3, 2009

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    Just next to the New Mosque you can find Spice Bazar. It's a rather old building built in the 17th century. The name "Egyptian" Bazar came from the fact that many goods that were sold there were brought from Egypt.
    It's a good place to buy souvenirs, spices, Turkish tea, scarfs ect. Keep in mind that it's always good to haggle.

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Egyptian Spice Bazaar

    by traveloturc Written Nov 28, 2008

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    Egyptian Bazaar

    Centuries ago in the Byzantine era there was coveredd market place on the location of the current spice market called "Makron Emvolos" and this area was mainly occupied by jews .When it was considered to build a new market place the jews where transferred to Balat district
    The construction of the spice market which was the islamic social concept of New Mosque
    and this is the second largest covered market place in Istanbul started in 1597 with the instructions of Safiye sultan who was the wifw of the ottoman ruler Murat III and the mother of Ottoman ruler Mehmet III.
    You can also visit my tip about the place in my shopping tips

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  • neodue's Profile Photo

    SPICE (EGYPTIAN) MARKET

    by neodue Written Nov 23, 2008

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    This is the second big covered market of Istanbul.It is part of the NEW MOSQUE complex.
    If you go to Istanbul do not miss that market.It s full of wiht spice and colored oriental objects.
    Spices,Sweets,Turkish Bacon (Pastirma),Nuts,Delicatessens etc.

    The building itself is part of the kulliye(complex) of Yeni Mosque, and rents from the shops within was intended to help pay for the upkeep of the mosque. The structure was designed by the chief court architect Koca Kasým Aða, but completed by architect Mustafa in 1660.

    The Spice Bazaar is an “L”-shaped building, consisting of 88 vaulted rooms, almost all of which are now divided into an upper and lower story. Monumental gateways are at the ends of both halls, with chambers above each entranceway. The main entrance is in the southwest corner, facing the Yeni Mosque.

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    The Spice Bazaar

    by MikeAtSea Written Oct 10, 2008

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    The Spice Bazaar
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    The Spice Bazaar or Egyptian Bazaar is one of the oldest bazaars in the city. Located in Eminonu, it is the second largest covered shopping complex after the Grand Bazaar.
    There are different accounts regarding the origin of the name of this bazaar. The bazaar was and to a lesser extend still is the center for the spice trade, and many spices used to be imported from Egypt in the past. On the other hand, in the Byzantine period, the site of the Spice Bazaar was the centre of corn trade. And the word misir has a double meaning in Turkish: "Egypt" and "corn".

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  • Aitana's Profile Photo

    Egyptian Bazaar, Misir Çarsisi

    by Aitana Written Aug 9, 2008

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    The Egyptian Bazaar of Spice Bazaar is a good place for buying groceries, spices, etc. Tourist also can find interesting souvenirs and carpets. It is part of the kulliye of Yeni mosque. It is smaller than the Grand Bazaar but also more pleasant to walk inside and impossible to get lost as it forms an L.

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  • Snipernurse's Profile Photo

    Egyptian/Spice Market

    by Snipernurse Updated Jun 24, 2008
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    I found the Egyptian market to be more interesting than it's bigger brother, the Grand Bazaar. Here spices and teas and all sorts of other interesting things are offered, giving you a chance to bring some pretty cool things home to your family. I bought a lot of different types of teas here, as well as candies, and was very happy with both. Be aware for pickpockets and barter hard!

    Turkish Delight Candies are a unique treat to buy, and are delicious

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  • albaaust's Profile Photo

    The Spice Market

    by albaaust Written Feb 23, 2008

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    Amongst the turkish delight, nougat and other yum!
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    This is a fantastic place to visit in terms of atmosphere: for the smells, sights and tastes. The beauty of this market is that you shop vendors will offer you tasty morsels to sample. Then of course you have to have a strong will not to buy!! At this market there is not just food. There are a small number of shops selling scarfs, lanterns and jewellery.

    Open everyday 8:00am-18:30pm.

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  • amouramour's Profile Photo

    Misir Çarsisi

    by amouramour Written Aug 10, 2007

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    The Spice Bazaar, the second largest covered market in the city is located in Eminönü.We call it 'Misir Çarsisi'' in Turkish..Misir has 2 meanings in Turkish:One is ''corn'' , the other is ''Egypt''.

    On the mosque side of the L-shaped Spice Bazaar, there is a popular flower market and cafes, and fish, vegetable and grocery stores occupy the other side. Once all of the shops inside the bazaar used to sell spices, but over the time some have turned into dried fruit, grocery and gift shops or jewelers.

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  • clouds111's Profile Photo

    Spice Market

    by clouds111 Written Jul 26, 2007

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    Egyptian Spice Market (Misir Çarsisi) was built in 1664 and is near the Eminönü ferry port and was apparently built as a part of the Yeni Mosque complex to generate money for the maintenance of the mosque.

    Not as crazy or as big as the Grand Bazaar and is a wonderfully colourful place. Here you can obviously buy a whole range of spices, dried fruits, nuts and seeds, lokum (Turkish Delight), alternative remedies, as well as fresh fruit, veg and cheese from the stalls just outside the Eminönü gate to the market.

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  • buy a kleenex pack its the sneezing bazaar

    by doctor_anees Written Jun 3, 2007

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    pigeons in front of the bazaar entrance

    If you are not accustomed to spices then take a pack of tissues with you as you will go sneezing around.Spices of all colors and tastes are sold here but they are very expensive compared to other bazaars in the middle east,yet for a european or american it is a nice experience.
    One thing made us curious as we saw what they call TURKISH VIAGRA and after we examined it we found it to be a dried fig with nuts stuffed in it, they claim it makes wonders for both men and women alike .....but as a doctor myself i doubt it.
    As for the name i found nothing egyptian in it but we understood that in ancient times egyptian merchants sold their spices and herbs here

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  • PierreZA's Profile Photo

    Spice Bazaar: More than shopping

    by PierreZA Updated Apr 15, 2007

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    Spice Market

    A covered souq, mostly selling spices, lokum and dried fruit. Not as crowded as the Grand Bazaar, but busy. Explore the area around this bazaar where you wil find many other shops, and much cheaper.
    The bazaar is in a beautiful old building.

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  • AcornMan's Profile Photo

    Spice Bazaar/Market (aka Egyptian Bazaar/Market)

    by AcornMan Updated Mar 31, 2007

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    Typical scene in the Spice Bazaar

    Although much smaller than the Grand Bazaar, the Spice Bazaar (also called the Spice Market, Egyptian Bazaar, or Egyption Market) is the place to go for every kind of culinary delight under the Turkish Sun. You can buy countless kinds of spice, seasoning, tea, and candy here. And although you'll be tempted to start buying things the moment you walk in the door, note that the prices get lower and lower the farther you get into the building. And since you can find the same things for sale all over the place, you don't have to worry about missing your chance if you don't make a purchase at the first place you see.

    Do yourself a huge favor and buy some Turkish Delights while you're here. In fact, buy LOTS of them and have them vacuum packed so you can take them home and enjoy them later, because they are extremely hard to find outside Turkey. Our favorite kind was the one sweetened with honey and rolled in powdered sugar. We brought back three kilograms of them and ate them all within a couple weeks of returning home!

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  • H-TownJourneyman's Profile Photo

    Misir Çarsisi

    by H-TownJourneyman Updated Feb 18, 2007

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    Entrance to Egyptian Spice Bazaar
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    Built in 1664 to help pay for the construction of the Yeni Camii, or the New Mosque, the Egyptian Spice Bazaar has for centuries been a marketplace for food products. It's name comes from the spices that came through Egypt via the renowned Silk Road out of central & southern Asia. Nowadays, vendors still sell such items here - fresh spices, fruits, nuts, meats, & candy, as well as other products like jewelry, carpets, & souvenirs for visitors. As in the Grand Bazaar, you can put your bargaining skills to the test here. Also akin to the Grand Bazaar are many of the shop owners, who can get a little aggressive in trying to show you what they are selling (and hoping you will buy something). But this is the bazaar experience! And if the Spice Bazaar itself doesn't fill your needs, as you walk outside, there is an even bigger outdoor market area, with loads of vendors selling many of the same products!

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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    A feast for the senses

    by Tijavi Updated Feb 3, 2007

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    Although not as grand as the Grand Bazaar, the Spice Bazaar definitely deserves a visit. You don't have to buy anything. The place is oozing with color and aromas that will tantalize your senses. The spices on sale are as a riot of colors as they are an assault to your nostrils. And oh, the dates and other dried fruits and nuts, mostly from the Middle East, are an exotic delicacy. There are still more to enjoy and feast your curious eyes on -- potions, herbal remedies, olive oil soaps, etc. Definitely a feast for the senses.

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