Egyptian (Spice) Market, Istanbul

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  • Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR
    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR
    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR
    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • Sharon's Profile Photo

    They Egyptian (Spice) Market

    by Sharon Written Oct 2, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Thats another market not to be missed.
    Once we ended exploring the grand bazaar, we jus asked where is the spice market, it was just a out there, not too far, we left the Grannd Bazzar from the opposite exit to where we entered and walked a bit through another street market till we arrived the Egyptian Market.
    Ha ! there was no doubt it was it. The Smells, the colores, the goods... I just love it.
    This market is not a big one but its a lovely one, if you like spices and colors you'll love it, also you can buy there sweets and other Turkish stuff.
    Ending this Market you find your self out by the sea niot far from where you take the boats to the bosphoros. (sorry, alreadyforot the nake of the place, i'll add it when i'll remember).

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  • PierreZA's Profile Photo

    Spice Bazaar: More than shopping

    by PierreZA Updated Apr 15, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Spice Market

    A covered souq, mostly selling spices, lokum and dried fruit. Not as crowded as the Grand Bazaar, but busy. Explore the area around this bazaar where you wil find many other shops, and much cheaper.
    The bazaar is in a beautiful old building.

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  • Avryle's Profile Photo

    The Markets

    by Avryle Written Apr 20, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Grand Bazaar

    You can't miss the markets. Kapali Carsi (more commoly known as the Grand Bazaar or Covered Market) is the one most often visited by tourists which means its also the one that's out to scalp tourists more. Personally I prefered the Misir Carsisi (Spice Market). This is the ultimate one-stop shopping area for gifts as well as a great place to meet some of the vendors and chat. Have fun testing your haggling skills here!

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  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Updated Jun 10, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Spice Market - Misir Carsisi, Istanbul, TR
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    Spice Bazaar is one of the most colorful spots of Istanbul, which every local and tourist has to see and taste the amazing atmosphere .... :)

    "Its the second large covered bazaar in city after Grand Bazaar."

    Here you can watch my HD Video of "Spice Market" ... :
    Video

    The Spice Bazaar is an “L”-shaped building, consisting of 88 vaulted rooms, almost all of which are now divided into an upper and lower story. Monumental gateways are at the ends of both halls, with chambers above each entrance way. The main entrance is in the southwest corner, facing the Yeni Mosque.

    There are several documents suggesting the name of the bazaar was first "New Bazaar".

    The building was endowed to the foundation of the "New Mosque" and got its name because it was built with the revenues from Egypt. The word mısır has a double meaning in Turkish: "Egypt" and "maize". The bazaar was (and still is) the center for spice trade in Istanbul, but in the last years more and more shops of other type are replacing the spice shops.

    A nice place to spend time, walk around, taste the Turkish Delight offers of the vendors, have a sip of a Turkish Tea or Coffee and to enjoy the day .... :)

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  • Lion_Beat's Profile Photo

    Misir Carsisi ( Egyptian Spice Market)

    by Lion_Beat Updated Jul 10, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Misir Carsisi / Spices

    Well it's not what it was once... as I understood.
    Ourdays just a place for tourists (cause locals don't buy anything from here).
    Pretty much spices, but also souvenirs like in Kapali Carsi. Buy the way spices can look great, but the price you will pay, will be bigger (cuase its a 'for tourists' price).

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Spice market

    by Raimix Updated Feb 6, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    Spice market, differently, Egyptian market, is the most exotic visited markets in Istanbul, filled with a smell of spice and different food (sweets, vegetables, so on). It was built in 1664 in quite comfortable place to have a business (near Galata bridge, where a lot of passengers arrived by boats)

    Name of Egyptian market is due to fact that most of spices were imported through Egypt.

    I have bought couple of spice packs and Turkish lokum (sweets) as souvenirs.

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  • ophiro's Profile Photo

    The spice market

    by ophiro Written Jul 27, 2005

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    Spices and other good stuff

    Very close to the new mosque you will find one of the most beautiful bazaars.
    The spice bazaar or the egyptian bazaar is a place where you will find many spices from around the world , a lot of turkish delights , nuts ans seeds and more tasty things.

    Many sellers will try to sell you the goods from their store , sometimes they will try speak in your own language to impress you.
    If you want something sometimes they will let you taste.

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  • Aitana's Profile Photo

    Egyptian Bazaar, Misir Çarsisi

    by Aitana Written Aug 9, 2008

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    The Egyptian Bazaar of Spice Bazaar is a good place for buying groceries, spices, etc. Tourist also can find interesting souvenirs and carpets. It is part of the kulliye of Yeni mosque. It is smaller than the Grand Bazaar but also more pleasant to walk inside and impossible to get lost as it forms an L.

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Spice Market (or Egyptian)

    by Martin_S. Updated Jan 14, 2009

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    Spice Market candies, Istanbul, Turkey
    3 more images

    My wife had been to the Spice Market several years ago and she described to me the three S's of the market Sight/Sound/Smell. The Smell of the spices being the strongest and the Sight of them being the most impressive. When we visited together, she found that many of the shops that had sold spices and candies (two photos shown here) had disappeared and you found in their place shops pandering to the foreign tourist, some with jewelery of gold, but also some with "junk" items of low cost for souveniers. It is worth a visit and you can do it if you plan a walk from the Suleymaniye Mosque all the way down to the Galata Bridge.

    Even though we visited in September, a decidedly cool month we still found the streets and shops packed with people, mostly local, but with a good peppering of foreigners.

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  • call_me_rhia's Profile Photo

    Spices, sweets, perfumes

    by call_me_rhia Written Apr 24, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    nuts at the egyptian market

    One interesting place to visit is the Egyptian market. It's located near the Galata Bridge (Sultanahmed side) inside a long ottoman building crossed by some "tunnels" - or better shopping alleys. Basically it looks (and is) a covered souq.

    There are plenty of stalls selling all sorts of spices, nuts and perfumes - varying in price.
    Ignore the ones with writings in all languages - they have the highest prices... keep walking and look around till you find what you are looking for at the right price.

    Saffron (of the same quality), for example, came in a large price range - sometimes it cost more than 10 times as much as in other places. My best suggestion is to buy where local people are buying... which are obviously the most crowded stalls. if a place has a tout, you might as well ignore it.

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  • asolotraveler's Profile Photo

    Egyptian Bazaar Spice City

    by asolotraveler Written Dec 27, 2011

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    Lots of Spices
    1 more image

    There are many reveiewss on the history of the Spice Bazaar, wo I will not bore you with it. I do want to share with you a tip if you are buying SAFFRON. Get ii from "Arifoglu" number 31 in the Bazaar. I personally met the young man (Teslim Sarigol) and he did right by me. I purchased 1 gram each for myself and a friend (25 lira) each but 10 USA cheaper than the 1 gram here at home. How about Scarves? Well I went to Number 61 or 65 and there was a 5 lira sale gong on and I purchased scarves that they were going out of style. Inside the very nicely furnished shop, there are gorgeous 100% Silk scarves that were a bit out of my spending realm. ( I will just have to save up for next time). I enjoyed walking around looking at all the people, though it is pretty much the same merchandise as the Grand Bazaar. I did go outside and turned left and began walking up the outside streets. That is where it is really exciting. Need a Gold fish for the kids?. They have them. How about a bunny rabbit? They are there also. The side streets are busy, but more layed back. I wound up in front of a Scarf and Jewelry Shop, that I ended up speding a small fortune, the prices were so very good. Again, beautiful scarves and Necklaces about 10 Lira. Shoppers Paradise. Have a great Time!

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  • albaaust's Profile Photo

    The Spice Market

    by albaaust Written Feb 23, 2008

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    Amongst the turkish delight, nougat and other yum!
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    This is a fantastic place to visit in terms of atmosphere: for the smells, sights and tastes. The beauty of this market is that you shop vendors will offer you tasty morsels to sample. Then of course you have to have a strong will not to buy!! At this market there is not just food. There are a small number of shops selling scarfs, lanterns and jewellery.

    Open everyday 8:00am-18:30pm.

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  • amouramour's Profile Photo

    Misir Çarsisi

    by amouramour Written Aug 10, 2007

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    1 more image

    The Spice Bazaar, the second largest covered market in the city is located in Eminönü.We call it 'Misir Çarsisi'' in Turkish..Misir has 2 meanings in Turkish:One is ''corn'' , the other is ''Egypt''.

    On the mosque side of the L-shaped Spice Bazaar, there is a popular flower market and cafes, and fish, vegetable and grocery stores occupy the other side. Once all of the shops inside the bazaar used to sell spices, but over the time some have turned into dried fruit, grocery and gift shops or jewelers.

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  • cherrytomato's Profile Photo

    Egyptian (Spice) Bazar

    by cherrytomato Written Jan 3, 2009

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    Just next to the New Mosque you can find Spice Bazar. It's a rather old building built in the 17th century. The name "Egyptian" Bazar came from the fact that many goods that were sold there were brought from Egypt.
    It's a good place to buy souvenirs, spices, Turkish tea, scarfs ect. Keep in mind that it's always good to haggle.

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  • Heniko's Profile Photo

    Spice Market

    by Heniko Written Apr 20, 2006

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    It is in Istanbul, Eminonu. It was commissioned by Mehmet the Fourth mother, Hatica Turhan Sultan as a donation for Yeni Mosque. The construction was initiated with Architect Kasim Aga and was completed in 1660 by Architect Mustafa Aga. It has six gates and 86 shops. It has gained its recent look after 1943 restoration.

    Though being smaller in surface than Kapalicarsi, it still is a place of interest where especially foreign tourists cannot afford to miss. Like in Kapalisicarsi, two main gates of Misir Bazaar connect Eminonu and Sultanhamam districts. Its gates at the side grant access to Yani Mosque, Tahtakale, Mercan, .yemis Dock and Supurgeciler.

    While the world was just in the wake of turning to natural products, Anatolia, which has raised Herbalists, has been distributing for centuries the healing power of the plants through Misir Bazaar.

    Misir Bazaar which has ranch-made or village-made cheese for those who cannot adapt to a change is taste, sausages and beans on display, does not seem to be losing this traditional capacity for many more years to come.

    Really an interesting place for any traveller, seeker of culture and culinarian...

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