Eyup District, Istanbul

4.5 out of 5 stars 7 Reviews

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  • Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR
    Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR
    Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR
    Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • magor65's Profile Photo

    Eyup - conservative face of Istanbul

    by magor65 Written Feb 25, 2014

    After visiting such districts as Beyoglu you have an impression that Istanbul is a cosmopolitan city. Well, it is, but not in Eyup. So if you want to see its more consrvative face, visit Eyup.
    Eyup is important for Muslims because of its mosque and the tomb of Ayyub Al-Ansan who was a trusted companion of prophet Muhammed. No wonder it is a site of pilgrimages packed with people who come here to pray. I must admit i felt a bit uneasy, realizing that i was an intruder who came there just of curiosity. But the people were not hostile, rather indifferent and some even friendly. We entered the mosque and the tomb, of course properly covered up.
    When we left the mosque grounds, this religious atmosphere was gone, although tourists were still in vast minority. In the arcaded square adjacent to to the mosque we met a group of women and children dressed in colourful wide trousers ( salwars). They were smiling at us and soon we had some photos taken together.
    The main street of Eyup is lined with shops, bars and restaurants, but we didn't stop there as we headed for Pierre Loti cafe.

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  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Written Jun 15, 2013

    Abdulvedut Sultan Tomb (Yavedut SultanTürbesi) is located next to the cemetery on Defterdar Street on Eyup district.

    It is build by Pertevniyal Valide Sultan, who is mother of Sultan Abdulaziz, by the year of 1875.

    As you walk from Eminonu district on Golden Horn seaside to direction of Eyup, you will see the tomb on your left handside.

    Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR Tomb of Abdulvedut Sultan, Istanbul, TR
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    • Religious Travel

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  • smeagol13's Profile Photo

    a completely spritual atmosphere: EYUP

    by smeagol13 Updated Apr 17, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Eyup Sultan is said to be the person who hosted the prophet Mohammad in Madina. he was murdered in an invasion attempt to Istanbul, and his grave was found after centuries.

    I did not have the opportunity to see this place but it is commonly said that it is a pity to leave Istanbul before seeing and maybe feeling the religious atmposphere of this place.

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Eyup Sultana

    by maykal Written Feb 15, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just outside the old city walls, further up the Golden Horn, lies the "village" of Eyup, which houses one of the most important shrines in islam. Eyup Ensari, Prophet Mohammed's standard-bearer, is buried here, and as a result, the village has several mosques and shrines to visit. Non-Muslims can enter he main shrine, a tiny room off the main mosque courtyard which contains Eyup Ensar's grave as well as a footprint of Prophet Mohammed. The shrine is always crowded, especially on Fridays, and the atmosphere can be quite intense. Shoes should be removed outside, and headscarves are available for women. Avoid prayer times if you can. Photos are no problem...all the locals have cameraphones flashing in every direction, so there's no reason why you can't, but be discreet.

    The streets connecting the mosques have now become lively street markets. The emphasis is on religious items (Korans, prayer beads, quotations on wall hangings, that sort of thing...), but that's not to say you won't find cheap watches and bellydancing Barbie dolls here too! The square by the main shrine is a popular place to sit, with fountains and pigeons galore. Plenty cafes provide refreshment, some of them claiming to be old and famous.

    After visiting the mosques and shrines, you can walk around the expansive graveyards and see the selaborate headstones. This is apparently the third holiest site in Islam, the first two being Mecca and Jerusalem, so of course demand to be buried here is high. The graveyard extends to the top of the hill, quite an impressive sight. It looks as if a cable car is being built to take people to the top of the hill...may be in operation by the time you visit.

    Fridays are very busy here, with brides coming to be blessed with fertility, and young boys in elaborate white robes preparing for their circumcision "party". Even if you don't set foot in the mosque on these busy days, it is worth visiting the village just to soak up some of the festive atmosphere.

    Street market, Eyup Gravestones, Eyup Gravestones, Eyup Fountain, Eyup
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  • astro_kerryn's Profile Photo

    Eyup district

    by astro_kerryn Updated Mar 10, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located towards the end of the Golden Horn harbor, Eyup district is considered one of the most sacred areas in Istanbul. Eyup al-Ansari, a friend of Prophet Mohammed and standard bearer of the Muslim Army, was killed by an arrow during the Arabic siege of Constantinople. Buried by his friends, Eyup's tomb was re-discovered by the Mehmet the Conqueror and his teacher after the fall of Constantinople. In the following centuries, Eyup District became one of the greatest cemeteries of the Orient.

    Eyup was Istanbul's first Ottoman Turkish settlement. As well as the average man on the street, a large number of prominent public figures have chosen Eyup as their final resting place during both the Ottoman period and the days of the Republic. This means that there are graves everywhere!!

    Eyup Sultan Türbesi, which is perhaps one of the most celebrated sites of Eyup, draws vast crowds on religious feast days and public holidays. It is also place of pilgrimage for newly-weds and circumcision parties. But Eyup was also famed for a host of other things: The fishermen who sell their bountiful catch from the Golden Horn, its florists and dairies, shoreline cafes, toy tambourines, drums and whistles; the toy makers of Eyup would have been kept busy under the spiritual leadership of Eyup Sultan, who is believed to have adored children.

    I loved this area and it was the highlight of my visit to Istanbul. You can go into the tomb, but as a woman you are required to wear a head scarf, which they provide at the door. I felt unbelievably priveledged to see Muslims in utter worship at the feet of their prophet's dead diciple.

    SEE SOME MORE PHOTO'S FROM THE EYUP DISTRICT IN MY ISTANBUL TRAVELOGUE.

    Circumcision party going into Eyup tomb
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  • hekate's Profile Photo

    Eyup Sultan Cemetery

    by hekate Updated Feb 24, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The hills above the Eyup mosque are a popular burial place. I was told that this is actually one of the oldest cemeteries in Istanbul. It is also the place where people who played a significant role in the cultural and political life of the city are buried.

    The cemetery is a picturesque mixture of ornate Ottoman stones and modern gravestones. The oldest ones are closer to the mosque. Walking your way up to the Pierre Loti Cafe you will see that gravestones are newer.

    Walking up the hill through the cemetery is worthwhile not only from a cultural point of view (I believe that graveyards are revealing a lot for the culture of a certain nation) but also because of the wonderful view spreading in front of you once you reach the Pierre Loti Cafe on the top of the hill.

    Eyup Sultan Cemetery
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  • Svillegas's Profile Photo

    Eÿup Cementery

    by Svillegas Written Jun 8, 2005

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On the way of the Pierre Lotti cafa there's an splendid cementery. If you are one of these people that feel fascination for cementeries you'll have a great experince.

    Cementery

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