Eyup Sultan, Istanbul

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  • Eyup Sultan Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    Eyup Sultan Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Eyup Sultan Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    Eyup Sultan Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Eyup Sultan Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    Eyup Sultan Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • magor65's Profile Photo

    Pierre Loti cafe

    by magor65 Written Feb 25, 2014
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    Who was Pierre Loti? He was a French naval officer and writer, but above all he was a Turkophile. During his visit to istanbul in 1876, he fell in love with Aziyade, a married Turkish woman. Aziyade used to sneak out of her husband's house to spend precious moments in the arms of her foreign lover. There was no happy end, though. Loti went back to France and when he came to istanbul again some time later he found that Aziyade was dead. As a proof of his true love for her he wore a golden ring with her name to the end of his life.
    Loti is said to have spent a lot of time in the cafe at the top of the hill over the Golden Horn. But the teahouse we visit today is the reconstruction of the original place. Still it's worth visiting. First, the views of the Golden Horn are stunning. Besides, the walk up the hill from the Eyup Sultan mosque to the cafe is really nice and interesting. You may take a cable car up the hill, but we preferred to walk, which took us about 20 minutes. The paved path is shaded with trees and leads through an old cemetary. The reason for the cemetary's big size is that everyone who could afford being buried here, wanted to rest near the sacred site of the Eyup mosque.
    When we got to the top we went inside the cafe to see some objects on display connected with Pierre Loti. You can also buy his books there in several languages, including the famous "Aziyade".
    We didn't drink or eat anything there and were fully content with the beautiful views. But if anyone counts on cold beer there, they will be disappointed because no alcoholic drinks are served in this place.

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    Eyup Sultan Mosque

    by magor65 Written Feb 25, 2014
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    The Eyup Sultan Mosque is for Muslims the most sacred site in Istanbul. The mosque was built by Mehmet the Conqueror over the tomb of Ayyub Al-Ansari who was a trusted companion of prophet Muhammed. He died carrying the banner of Islam during the attack on Constantinople in the 8th century.
    The baroque building we see today has replaced the original mosque which was destroyed in the earthquake of 1766.
    It used to be the site of important ceremonies in the Ottoman times. Here the sultans completed their coronation and sword-bearing rituals. Today the site is very popular with newly weds and as the venue of circumcision parties.
    The holiest place of the mosque is the tomb which has beautiful crystal chandeliers and iznik tiles. You can also see there the Prophet Muhammed's footprint placed in a glass case.

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  • magor65's Profile Photo

    Eyup - conservative face of Istanbul

    by magor65 Written Feb 25, 2014
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    After visiting such districts as Beyoglu you have an impression that Istanbul is a cosmopolitan city. Well, it is, but not in Eyup. So if you want to see its more consrvative face, visit Eyup.
    Eyup is important for Muslims because of its mosque and the tomb of Ayyub Al-Ansan who was a trusted companion of prophet Muhammed. No wonder it is a site of pilgrimages packed with people who come here to pray. I must admit i felt a bit uneasy, realizing that i was an intruder who came there just of curiosity. But the people were not hostile, rather indifferent and some even friendly. We entered the mosque and the tomb, of course properly covered up.
    When we left the mosque grounds, this religious atmosphere was gone, although tourists were still in vast minority. In the arcaded square adjacent to to the mosque we met a group of women and children dressed in colourful wide trousers ( salwars). They were smiling at us and soon we had some photos taken together.
    The main street of Eyup is lined with shops, bars and restaurants, but we didn't stop there as we headed for Pierre Loti cafe.

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  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Eyup Sultan Mosque, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Updated May 20, 2013
    Eyup Sultan Mosque, Istanbul, TR
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    The "Eyüp Sultan Mosque" is the holiest site in Istanbul and one of the most sacred places in the Islamic World.

    The mosque gives its name to the district which it has placed in and we must say Eyüp Sultan Mosque is also a complex. Eyüp Sultan Mosque and Complex is located on the north coast of the Golden Horn. The mosque was a one of the most important holy places which is accepted by the Turks. Hz.Eyübbi El-Ensari, who was one of first people accepting Islam and was killed during the siege of Constantinople in 7th century, was buried in the area of the complex; therefore, a mausoleum and a mosque were made in this area by the order of Fatih Sultan Mehmet.

    The complex was stared to be built with mausoleum in 1458 and continued to be built mosque, kitchen, madrasas and baths. There is a centuries-old plane tree in the middle of the courtyard and the structures have been standing proudly as the plane tree, of course, the structures were repaired several times after 1458.

    The mausoleum was decorated with tiles in 16th century but silver candlesticks in the mausoleum were placed in the last periods. The mausoleum has a dome 8-pointed. The mosque is in the group of 8 pillars mosques in terms of its plan. There are cypress trees and cemeteries around the mosque. Cemeteries belong to Necip Fazıl, Fevzi Çakmak, Ferhat Pasha, Mehmet Pasha, Ahmet Haşim, Sivavuş Pasha, Ziya Osman Saba and Sokullu Mehmet Pasha.

    In ancient times, Sultans came to the Bostan wharf from Mansion of Sinan Pasha by boats and after prayed, they were got on the sword of Şeyhülislam and they completed to dress the sword weeding ceremony. The tradition was started by Fatih Sultan Mehmet and its sword was encompassed by Akşemsettin who was the teacher of Fatih.

    The Tomb of Eyüp Sultan is a wonderfully decorated burial site that’s even more beautiful on the inside. The tomb is almost constantly full of pilgrims paying their respects, so make sure to act accordingly. You’re also likely to see young boys in curious white costumes visiting the tomb as a part of their sünnet—the circumcision ritual that most Turkish boys undergo.

    The mosque has a separate entrance for women, who generally pray in the upper gallery, but it’s usually possible for female tourists to enter through the main entrance, provided that they stick to the usual mosque etiquette. When you’re done with the tomb, u can go for a walk up the hill through the cemetery, all the way to Pierre Loti Cafe.

    The kitchen and madrasas can’t be seen today but one of the most beautiful Turkish baths has come up today. The masterpiece is too crowded during Ramadan also very crowded on every Friday. You can be fascinated by old trees, doves, people who are praying. You will feel yourself in a different atmosphere ... :)

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    EYÜP CAMII

    by mtncorg Written Nov 15, 2011

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    In front of the Camii
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    Built in 1458, the Eyüp Camii is built next to the tomb of Abu Ayyub al-Mansari. Abu Ayyub was a close companion of Muhammed and the standard bearer of the faith. When Muhammed left Mecca for Medina in the hijra – 622 – he lived with Abu Ayyub for seven months. Abu Ayyub went on to a long military career In the service of the new faith. Eventually old age caught up with him on a raid led by Muawiajh’s son Yazid against Constantinople in 674. Falling ill he was visited by Yazid who asked him if he needed anything. Abu Ayyub replied, “ Convey my salaams (farewells) to the Muslim armies and tell them Abu Ayyub urges you to penetrate deeply into the territory of the enemy as far as you can go, that you should carry him with you and that you should bury him under your feet at the walls of Constantinople.” With Abu Ayyub’s death, the army of Yazid carried out his wishes burying him at the walls of Constantinople. They were unable to breach the walls however. That event would have to wait another 778 years. Lying outside the city walls, the Eyüp district was long used as a burial area – Christian cemeteries predating the vast Muslim cemetery spread out on the hillside above the Golden Horn. The tomb of Abu Ayyub - said to have been rediscovered by the spiritual advisor of Mehmet II – is an important pilgrimage site. Relics within the tomb include a stone said to bear the footprint of Muhammed.

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    Eyup

    by cherrytomato Written Jan 3, 2009

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    It was the first mosque built after Mehmer had conquered Constantinople. This place is considered as a second place of pilgrimage for Muslims as it's believed to be the place where Eyyb el Ensari (one of the first Arabs) was killed and buried.

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  • smeagol13's Profile Photo

    a completely spritual atmosphere: EYUP

    by smeagol13 Updated Apr 17, 2007

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    Eyup Sultan is said to be the person who hosted the prophet Mohammad in Madina. he was murdered in an invasion attempt to Istanbul, and his grave was found after centuries.

    I did not have the opportunity to see this place but it is commonly said that it is a pity to leave Istanbul before seeing and maybe feeling the religious atmposphere of this place.

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    Eyup Sultana

    by maykal Written Feb 15, 2006

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    Street market, Eyup
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    Just outside the old city walls, further up the Golden Horn, lies the "village" of Eyup, which houses one of the most important shrines in islam. Eyup Ensari, Prophet Mohammed's standard-bearer, is buried here, and as a result, the village has several mosques and shrines to visit. Non-Muslims can enter he main shrine, a tiny room off the main mosque courtyard which contains Eyup Ensar's grave as well as a footprint of Prophet Mohammed. The shrine is always crowded, especially on Fridays, and the atmosphere can be quite intense. Shoes should be removed outside, and headscarves are available for women. Avoid prayer times if you can. Photos are no problem...all the locals have cameraphones flashing in every direction, so there's no reason why you can't, but be discreet.

    The streets connecting the mosques have now become lively street markets. The emphasis is on religious items (Korans, prayer beads, quotations on wall hangings, that sort of thing...), but that's not to say you won't find cheap watches and bellydancing Barbie dolls here too! The square by the main shrine is a popular place to sit, with fountains and pigeons galore. Plenty cafes provide refreshment, some of them claiming to be old and famous.

    After visiting the mosques and shrines, you can walk around the expansive graveyards and see the selaborate headstones. This is apparently the third holiest site in Islam, the first two being Mecca and Jerusalem, so of course demand to be buried here is high. The graveyard extends to the top of the hill, quite an impressive sight. It looks as if a cable car is being built to take people to the top of the hill...may be in operation by the time you visit.

    Fridays are very busy here, with brides coming to be blessed with fertility, and young boys in elaborate white robes preparing for their circumcision "party". Even if you don't set foot in the mosque on these busy days, it is worth visiting the village just to soak up some of the festive atmosphere.

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  • hekate's Profile Photo

    Eyup Camii (Eyup Mosque)

    by hekate Updated Jun 24, 2005

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    Eyup Camii (Eyup Mosque)

    The great Mosque of Eyup lies outside the city walls near the Golden Horn, at the supposed place where Eyup, the standard bearer of the Prophet Mohammed. died in the Islamic assault on Constantinople in 670. The first mosque built after the Ottomanconquest of the city, this greatly venerated shrine attracts many pilgrims.

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    Eyup Sultan Cemetery

    by hekate Updated Feb 24, 2005

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    Eyup Sultan Cemetery

    The hills above the Eyup mosque are a popular burial place. I was told that this is actually one of the oldest cemeteries in Istanbul. It is also the place where people who played a significant role in the cultural and political life of the city are buried.

    The cemetery is a picturesque mixture of ornate Ottoman stones and modern gravestones. The oldest ones are closer to the mosque. Walking your way up to the Pierre Loti Cafe you will see that gravestones are newer.

    Walking up the hill through the cemetery is worthwhile not only from a cultural point of view (I believe that graveyards are revealing a lot for the culture of a certain nation) but also because of the wonderful view spreading in front of you once you reach the Pierre Loti Cafe on the top of the hill.

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  • Eyup Sultan mosque

    by infinitys Updated Oct 21, 2004

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    One of the most important mosques of Islamic religion,which is located close to EYUP region of Istanbul. You may have some difficulties to find its location due to the complexity of Istanbul transportation system. But you must not miss to see this unique place. Christians are also allowed to enter the mosque.

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    Eÿup Cementery

    by Svillegas Written Jun 8, 2005

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    Cementery

    On the way of the Pierre Lotti cafa there's an splendid cementery. If you are one of these people that feel fascination for cementeries you'll have a great experince.

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