Golden Horn, Istanbul

4.5 out of 5 stars 9 Reviews

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  • Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR
    Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR
    Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR
    Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Haliç

    by MM212 Updated Mar 2, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Known as the Golden Horn in the western world, the Haliç (pronounced Ha-litch) is a natural creek branching from the Bosphorus Strait and separating historic Constantinople from the newer Galata/Beyoğlu area to the north. During Byzantine times, the Golden Horn was the city's natural harbour and provided effective protection from invaders. The Golden Horn is now crossed by Galata Bridge which connects old Istanbul with Beyoğlu.

    Hali�� seen from Topkapi Palace, Aug 2004

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  • iaint's Profile Photo

    always a thrill...

    by iaint Written Aug 4, 2007

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    You see it all the time - from the tram as you cross the Galata Bridge; from the ferry as you cross the Bosphorus or come in from the islands; from the spice bazaar; from the Galata Tower; from the Topkapi Palace.

    For me, it never ceases to give me a bit of a buzz.

    seen from north end of Galata Bridge
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Historical Travel

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  • Gerrem's Profile Photo

    The Golden Horn

    by Gerrem Written Jan 28, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Golden Horn is an estuary dividing the city of Istanbul.With the Sea of Marmara, the Golden Horn forms a peninsula with a deep natural harbor. This site was originally settled by ancient Greek colonists as the city of Byzantium. There were three notable times when the chain across the Horn was either broken or circumvented. In the 10th century the Vikings dragged their longships out of the Bosporus, around Galata, and relaunched them in the Horn; the Byzantines defeated them with Greek fire. In 1204, during the Fourth Crusade, Venetian ships were able to break the chain with a ram. In 1453, Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II, having failed in his attempt to copy the Venetians and break the chain with brute force, instead copied the tactics of the Rus', towing his ships across Galata into the estuary over greased logs.
    In 1502 Leonardo da Vinci produced a drawing of a single span 720-foot (240 m) bridge as part of a civil engineering project for Sultan Beyazid II. The bridge was intended to span the Golden Horn. It was never built, but Leonardo's vision was resurrected in 2001 when a smaller bridge based on his design was constructed in Norway.
    After the Fall of Constantinople to Mehmed, Greek citizens, the Greek Orthodox Church, Jews, Italian merchants, and other non-Muslims began to live along the Horn in the Phanar and Balat districts. Today the Golden Horn is settled on both sides, and there are parks along each shore. The Istanbul Chamber of Commerce is also located along the shore, as is a Muslim cemetery. The Galata Bridge, built in 1836, connects Old Istanbul with the districts of Galata and Eminönü. Two other bridges, the Atatürk Bridge and the Haliç Bridge, are located further up the Horn. Until the 1980s the Horn was a dumping ground for industrial waste, but has since been cleaned up and is a popular tourist attraction in Istanbul because of its history and beauty.

    A boat trip across the golden horn
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  • Pete.Gibson's Profile Photo

    Did you know

    by Pete.Gibson Written Oct 10, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Is in fact one of the best natural harbours in the world, which is why it was a busting port in Byzantine times in those times it was closed off with a huge Iron chain, One of the links can still be seen in the Naval Museum in Besiktas, there are three theories how the Golden horn got its name, firstly when the Byzantines where defeated they dumped their Gold and treasures into the water, to stop the Turks from getting them, the second the waters where so rich with fish and less glamourous but most likely is the third the colour the water turns at sunset

    Related to:
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    • Sailing and Boating
    • Budget Travel

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  • alectrevor's Profile Photo

    Golden Horn [Halic]

    by alectrevor Written May 30, 2009

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Going on the Golden Horn uses the public ferries, departing from Eminonu. The departure place is tucked away from the main places, passed the buses, near a building with the sign Stork. The ferry is hourly. The fare is 1.40 TL. Journey time is 30 minutes to Golden Horn bridge at Sutluce. You can walk over the blue painted bridge to take a bus back or return by ferry, at the ferry point is a openair cafe.

    Departure point at Eminou Openair cafe at Sutluce. Golden Horn bridge.

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  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Updated May 24, 2013

    Perfect spot in Istanbul where u can see the whole Golden Horn area connecting both parts of Istanbul and be able to shoot amazing photos .... :)

    There are several cafes and restaurants with a view which shouldnt be missed .. The area is called Pierre Loti and easy to be reached by taxi or by a funicular from the sea level up to the hill.

    The Golden Horn (Turkish: Halic) or Altın Boynuz is a historic inlet of the Bosphorus dividing the city of Istanbul and forming the natural harbor that has sheltered Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman and other ships for thousands of years. It is a scimitar-shaped estuary that joins the Bosphorus just at the point where that strait enters the Sea of Marmara, thus forming a peninsula the tip of which is "Old Istanbul".

    Haliç Bridge, which literally means the Golden Horn Bridge, is a highway bridge on the Golden Horn in Istanbul, Turkey. It connects the neighbourhoods of Ayvansaray in the south and Halıcıoğlu in the north. The O-1 highway passes through the Haliç Bridge. It was constructed between 1971 and 1974, and entered service on 10 September 1974.

    I suggest u to make a day visit this area and enjoy the view to the fullest ...

    Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR Golden Horn, Istanbul, TR
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    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    The Golden Horn

    by IreneMcKay Updated Oct 2, 2014

    The Golden Horn is Istanbul's Harbour. I used to love taking the little boat trip that went around it. On route you would pass some stunning buildings such as churches and mosques. One area the boat called at was Fener which once had the most important lighthouse on the Golden Horn. This area is an important centre for the Greek Orthodox Church as the Patriarchate is located here. Another area the boat calls at is Balat which was once home for Istanbul's Jewish community. There are still synagogues here.

    We normally got off the boat at Eyüp at the far end of the Golden Horn. There is a mosque here which is an extremely important sacred site for Muslims worldwide. The Eyüp Sultan Mosque, built in 1458, was the first mosque built by the Ottoman Turks following the Conquest of Constantinople. It is located next to the place where Eyüp Sultan, the standard-bearer of the prophet Muhammad, was buried during the First Arab Siege of Constantinople in the 670s. This mosque was also the traditional site of the coronation ceremonies of the Ottoman Sultans.

    You could also climb the hill behind Eyüp as it wended its way past lots of cemeteries with Ottoman style tombs. By this I mean many of the tall thin cylindrical gravestones had different styles of stone turbans on the top to show the rank of the person buried there. At the top of the hill you could visit the Pierre Loti Cafe and admire the wonderful views over the Golden Horn. Pierre Loti was the pseudonym of Julien Viaud, a French novelist and naval officer, who was born in 1850 and died in 1923. Loti spent a lot of time in Istanbul and was very fond of it. He lived in Eyüp for some time and often visited a cafe on the site of the present day Pierre Loti Cafe. You can sit on the cafe's terrace and drink Çay or smoke a narghile water pipe. Apparently there is now a cable car from Eyüp to the top of Pierre Loti Hill. You had to walk when we lived there.

    I remember buying a little souvenir porcelain lamp which was really a whistle with Eyüp written on it. The waters of the Golden Horn were very polluted and smelly back then. Hopefully, they have now improved. When we lived here Bedrettin Dalan became mayor of Istanbul and one of his election promises was he would make the Golden Horn as blue as his eyes.

    Sunset over the Golden Horn.
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

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  • LOHRER's Profile Photo

    see and to be seen

    by LOHRER Written Nov 23, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    daily life around the Golden Horn, people watching being watched, see and been seen. small stall vendors fresh fruit, icedream, some kid asking you to polish your shoes. children in a bram

    street, bridge life
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    • Arts and Culture

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  • Ivana5's Profile Photo

    GOLDEN HORN

    by Ivana5 Written Mar 5, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    * The 7 km long, narrow inlet, called Golden Horn, divides the European side of Istanbul into two (The Historical Peninsula to the south of Golden Horn and the Galata District to the north)

    Golden Horn
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    • Beaches

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