Hammams, Istanbul

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  • Hurrem Sultan Hammam, Istanbul, TR
    Hurrem Sultan Hammam, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Hurrem Sultan Hammam, Istanbul, TR
    Hurrem Sultan Hammam, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Hurrem Sultan Hammam, Istanbul, TR
    Hurrem Sultan Hammam, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Visit a Hamam

    by MikeAtSea Written Oct 5, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cagaloglu Hamami
    2 more images

    A Turkish bath is something unique and any visit to Istanbul without a stop there is not a complete visit. My recommendation is the Cagaloglu Hamami close to the Haghia Sophia. This Hamam has been voted over and over again as the best bathhouse in Istanbul and I bare witness to it.
    Choose the Sultan Treat where you experience a massage, a full scrub, a hair wash and the enjoyment of the hamam. This particular hamam was given to the city of Istanbul in 1741 and during this long history King Edward, Kaiser Wilhelm, Florence Nightingale and many more were spoiled. This hamam has both a woman and man section.

    Related to:
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  • PierreZA's Profile Photo

    Visit a hamam

    by PierreZA Updated Sep 30, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Flag seller

    To visit a hamam is another wonderful highlight of a visit to Istanbul. There is quite a choice from which you can choose, eg Cemberlitas and Galatasaray. I do suggest to visit a hamam which is frequented by the locals, and which is less touristy.
    There are quite a few all over the city. It is less expensive.
    You usually start in the sauna which is the hottest, then move to the washrooms where an assistant will help, after which you can have a good massage on the marble slab.
    It is quite an experience.

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  • Aitana's Profile Photo

    Suleymaniye Hamam

    by Aitana Written Aug 9, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Suleymaniye Hamam is placed on a hill facing the Golden Horn. It was built in 1550 by the architect Sinan as a part of the Suleymaniye mosque complex or Kulliyye.
    It consists of three sections, as usual: cold, lukewarm and hot. We were let clogs and towels. After relaxing and sweating in the warm room we passed to the hot room where we stayed for half an hour or more. There we could refresh with cold water. The wash and the massage were a good experience to us. Then we retired to a cooling room where we were served a cup of tea.
    When we went there were few tourists but for what I’ve read after, it seems that now it operates mainly to tourists.

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  • iilovepiink's Profile Photo

    Turkish Baths

    by iilovepiink Written Jul 27, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    embarrassing, i know

    You absolutely cannot travel to Turkey without having a hammam, or Turkish bath. Stay away if you are shy to nudity because all the locals and even the ladies scrubbing you down with a loofah that feels like a brilo pad will more than likely be topless if not totally nude. I recommend also that you have your hammam before you obtain a wonderful bronze tan from the Mediterranean sun, the loofah exfoliates your skin completely, leaving it silky smooth.

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  • Elena_blue's Profile Photo

    Cagaloglu hamam: Nice but not that nice...

    by Elena_blue Written Sep 6, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The typical turkish experience of hamam tailored to serve the tourists' curiosity. The surrounding is not extraordinary but it is still very nice with marbles and big patios.
    The complete service sosts about 30 E. You take the ticket and you are given a small cabinet whith a small bed, and hairdryer so that you can change and leave clothes there. The main hamam hall is all decorated with white marlbe, it has a dome. Full time there is about 1 hr, long waiting to become hot and swept and then a lady working there is taking care of you with bathing and massaging. Some women take their hamam with their bathing suites, some are totally naked, I prefered the latter. All women are looking around them with curiosity and maybe embarassment. I didn't see women to truly relax and enjoy.
    At the end of hamam, you return to your cabinet and you can take a tea to relax. A tip to the lady who took care of you is appreciated.
    On the overall if I reccomend it? I m a curious tourist myself and I enjoyed my first time there. On my next visit to Turkey, I do want to have hamam, at an original place though, where turkish women go there to enjoy it and not to satisfy their curiosity.

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  • Mixed Hammams in Istanbul

    by cruelspacey Written May 2, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hey guys, i went to istanbul recently and wanted to visit a hammam after readin your comments and suggestions. I wanted to go their with my bf so i went to sulemaniye but it was quiet expesnive, then i discovered Sultan Ahmet Hammam, ideally located and that too has a section for couples. Actualy it has two sections women and men but in men sections couples are also allowed. i was therew ith my bf and it was an awesome experince, out of this world. There were different couples around but a lot of men as it was a men's section. BUt we felt comfortable as other ladies were also around. U can wear a two piece but it is recommended that you just wear the wrap around u r provided with, as it helps them bathe u properly. And u dont necessarily have to be shaved, a lot of women were nt shaved, but no one felt embarassed. A gr8 hammam and brilliant experience, you all must try.

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  • luiggi's Profile Photo

    Cagaloglu Hamami

    by luiggi Updated Mar 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cagaloglu Hamami

    Cagaloglu Hamami was built by a sultan more than 300 years ago. Although the date of the construction and the name of the architect of the hamam is not known, it is said to have been built in the beginning of the 18th century. It is also said that the construction is one of Sinan's works of art.
    The Ottomans perfected the hamam, or Turkish bath which, like the Roman bath, had three rooms: the grand, steamy hot room (caldarium) for steam-soaking and massage; the warm room (tepidarium) for washing with soap and water; and the cool room for resting or napping (perhaps in a private cubicle) after the bath with a cup of Turkish coffee or a glass of tea.

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  • buna's Profile Photo

    Enjoy massage in Turkish Royal...

    by buna Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Enjoy massage in Turkish Royal Hamam
    You will feel like a king or a queen while you have a steam and hot water bath and a special hand made massage.with some extra money you can get some exta time and treatment

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  • maribelm's Profile Photo

    Un baño en un Hamam, para...

    by maribelm Updated Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Un baño en un Hamam, para conocer una tradicion del pais. Uno de los mejores y mas antiguos es el de Semberlitas, en el barrio del Gran Bazar. Si pides un completo te incluye el masaje y si estos te gustan te dejan como nuevo.

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  • lifeisatrip's Profile Photo

    The real Turkish bath?

    by lifeisatrip Written Jan 5, 2011
    1 more image

    Although I wanted to go to a different Hamam, we ended up going to Cemberlitas just because it was right by the Grand Bazaar. After a day of shopping, what best way to relax but in a Hamami? The scrub itself wasn't anything spectacular; I could have done it myself, although it was a nice change. Short, however. I could have stayed in there longer, but it got crowded and so I felt rushed to my oil massage session.

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  • 1princess's Profile Photo

    Istanbul Hammam

    by 1princess Written Aug 31, 2011

    Hey, I went in March and I went to a hammami in Istanbul called Tarahi Galatasaray. All female staff, I dont think any allow men to massage women, or I never found any. This one is in Taksim. Its simple but I had a great time!

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  • 1princess's Profile Photo

    Istanbul Hammam

    by 1princess Written Aug 31, 2011

    Hey, I went in March and I went to a hammami in Istanbul called Tarahi Galatasaray. All female staff, I dont think any allow men to massage women, or I never found any. This one is in Taksim. Its simple but I had a great time!

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  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Hurrem Sultan Hammam, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Written May 22, 2013
    Hurrem Sultan Hammam, Istanbul, TR
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    The Ayasofya "Haseki Hürrem Sultan Hamam" is amazing with its marbles and built for the Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent's wife in 1556. The Hamam was restored and reopened last year for outsiders to experience.

    The Haseki Hürrem Sultan Hamamı is a Turkish hamam that was commissioned by Sultan Suleyman I's consort, Hürrem Sultan, and constructed by Mimar Sinan during the 16th century in Istanbul. It was constructed for the religious community of the nearby Hagia Sophia.

    In 2007 Istanbul authorities decided to return the hamam to its original use after a 105-year hiatus and launched a tender for its restoration, won by a tourism development group. After a 3-year-long restoration project, the bath re-gained its glory and now being operated.

    Strongly adviced to give a try to loosen your tiredness after a long days walk in Istanbul ..... :)

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  • goatee010's Profile Photo

    A turkish bath: back to the 16th century

    by goatee010 Updated Mar 8, 2005

    Istanbul is a very noisy populated city and it was great to visit two small local hammams (not very touristic ones). Every visitor had a towel wraped around the waist. The interiors
    looked very simular: they were decorated with white and gray marble. When I entered the central space there was a warm marble plate on which people were laying down to relax. And in different corners there were warm- and coldwatertaps above washbasins for mixing water to a right temperature. People splashed the water with a bowl over their bodies.
    The temperature in the hamman was not too high, I usually do not like sauna's because I feel suffocated but I really liked it there. And you could cool yourself down with cold water if you got too warm. The little holes in the litte dome let some bundels of light in and created a mystic atmosphere. I did not hear any noise from outside, just the dripping of taps and the splashing of water. After a good massage I was totally relaxed and felt as if I was in the 16 th century. The turkish sultans must have bathed in the same manner as I did. It wasn't easy to get out and face the 21st century with dirt, airpolution and rain.

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  • deda88's Profile Photo

    Turkish Baths

    by deda88 Written Oct 8, 2003

    Steam bath and turkish massage in a clean marble hammam, chosen the best Turkish Bath in the world for the 2003 Year.
    Built more than 300 years ago, you can enjoy a Turkish Cafý after your relaxing bath.
    Price for a self bath is 10.000.000 TRLiras, you can add the same by an agreement with the Masseuesses/Masseur, having this way a complete bath for 20 milions instead of 30, and you can help the woman (who doesn't earn enough for the job).
    Open for men from 7 a. m. to 10 p.m. and for ladies 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Everyday including Sunday.

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Comments (1)

  • SatoM's Profile Photo
    Dec 30, 2012 at 5:10 PM

    I am trying to find a hamam in Pera that was known as the Cinili Hamam (at least at one time). The inside is covered with beautiful tiles from Kutahya (made by my grandfather, which is why I am trying to find it. Does anyone have any leads on this? Thank you, Sato

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