Hippodrome, Istanbul

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  • Hippodrome
    by Ewingjr98
  • Hippodrome
    by Ewingjr98
  • Istanbul - Turkey
    Istanbul - Turkey
    by solopes
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    Garden

    by solopes Updated Dec 26, 2013
    Istanbul - Turkey
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    The touristy centre of Istanbul is a garden that links Hagia Sophia with the blue mosque. Always crowded of people it is the place where photographers will find that there are no nice pictures from the monuments without strange people walking or resting but always in the most inconvenient positions, everybody bothering everybody in all the directions.

    Everything happens there, and life is also a good thing to retain.

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    Arts and Crafts

    by solopes Updated Dec 26, 2013
    Istanbul - Turkey
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    Some typical yards inside walls are used to display art and crafts, using the beauty of the scenery to promote the works. These cosy places bet in quality and design, far from the "chinawork" that fills the touristy stalls everywhere. The prices are, as expected, higher than in the banal markets.

    Maybe the most beautiful yard that we visited was entered by accident, when searching for the closed Roxelane baths.

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    Hippodrome of Constantinople

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 23, 2011
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    The name hippodrome is a Greek term for a stadium for horse racing and chariot racing. The Hippodrome of Constantinople was first constructed in 203 AD. When Constantine moved the capital of Rome to Constantinople, he expanded the hippodrome, making it a focus of recreation in the city.

    The location of the Hippodrome is marked by the Serpent Column (c. 479 BC), the Obelisk of Thutmose III (c. 1490 BC), and the Walled Obelisk (10th century), all located on the original race track. More modern is the Kaiser Wilhelm Fountain (1900), and of course, the Sultanahmet Mosque.

    The hippodrome, though today is just a flat square (called the Sultanahmet Meydani), was originally 1,476 feet long, 427 feet wide, and had stands that could seat 100,000 spectators. It is believed that many of the structures of the Hippodrome remain protected below Sultanahmet Square.

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    Hippodrome

    by iaint Updated Jan 30, 2010

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    Column of Constantine Porphyrogenitus
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    Not much remains of this 100,000 seater stadium built in the 5th century AD.

    The Egyptian obelisk was built in 1500 BC.

    The age of the Column of Constantine Porphyrogenitus is not known, but it was restored in 10th century AD.

    The fountain was built in 1898 to commemorate the visit of Kaiser Wilhelm II.

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    Hippodrome: Walled Obelisk

    by mvtouring Written Oct 9, 2009

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    The last obelisk to discuss is the walled one. In the 10th century the Emperor Constantine Porphyrogenitus built another obelisk at the other end of the Hippodrome. It was originally covered with gilded bronze plaques, but they were sacked by Latin troops in the Fourth Crusade. The stone core of this monument also survives, known as the Walled Obelisk.

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    Hippodrome: Serpentine Column

    by mvtouring Written Oct 9, 2009

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    If you wondered why there were so many columns & obelisk thingies around the hippodrome, then I cn tell you that it was to raise the image of his new capital. Constantine and his successors, especially Theodosius the Great, brought works of art from all over the empire to adorn it. The monuments were set up in the middle of the Hippodrome, the spina. Among these was the Tripod of Plataea, now known as the Serpent Column, cast to celebrate the victory of the Greeks over the Persians during the Persian Wars in the 5th century BC. Constantine ordered the Tripod to be moved from the Temple of Apollo at Delphi, and set in middle of the Hippodrome. The top was adorned with a golden bowl supported by three serpent heads. The bowl was destroyed or stolen during the Fourth Crusade. The serpent heads were destroyed as late as the end of the 17th Century, as many Ottoman miniatures show they were intact in the early centuries following the Turkish conquest of the city. Parts of the heads were recovered and are displayed at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum. All that remains of the Delphi Tripod today is the base, known as the "Serpentine Column".

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    Hippodrome : German Fountain

    by mvtouring Written Oct 9, 2009

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    Upon arrival at the Hippodrome, the first thing you will probably notice is the German Fountain which is a gazebo styled fountain in the northern end of old hippodrome (Sultanahmet Square) and across from the Mausoleum of Sultan Ahmed I. It was constructed to commemorate the second anniversary of German Emperor Wilhelm II's visit to Istanbul in 1898. It was built in Germany, then transported piece by piece and assembled in its current site in 1900. The neo-Byzantine style fountain's octagonal dome has eight marble columns, and dome's interior is covered with golden mosaics. Really a nice piece of artwork I thought. I also think the reason you spot it so quickly is that it does not really fit in with the rest of the architecture around here.

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    Hippodrome and Obelisks

    by cherrytomato Updated Jan 3, 2009

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    The square infront of the Blue Mosque covers the site of the ancient "Hippodrome". The Hippodrome was also knows as At Meydani - "plaza of horses". Unfortunately Hippodrome was destroyed and only few things still remain. What was left are three columns - stone obelisk, egyptian obelisk and serpantine column.
    Egyptian Obelisk (Dikilitas) was brought to Istanbul from Luxor by Emperor Theodosius in 390 AD. On all for sides of the obelisk there are pictograms. During their decoding it was found that several parts of this obelisk were missing. There are several explonations - it was either made deliberately to help the transportation or was broken during the shipment.
    Stone Obelisk (Orme Sutun) - it's a column built of stones. It was erected by the order of Emperor Constantine, that's why this obelisk is also called "the constantine column). At first the column was covered with bronze slabs which were stolen during the 4th Crusade. During the ottoman time Janissaries were competing while climbing it.
    Serpentine Column (Burmali Sutun) - was erected in the 5th century BC. The column was formed by 3 snake heads and names of greek cities. The column came to our days much destroyed - there are no snake heads and the column is much shorter than it used to be. One of the heads is now the exhibit of Archeoalogical Museum.

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    Hippodrome

    by MikeAtSea Written Oct 6, 2008

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    Hippodrome
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    Little is left of the gigantic stadium which once stood in the hears of the Byzantine city of Constantinople. It was originally laid out by Emperor Septimus Severus during his rebuilding of the city in the 3rd century AD. Emperor Constantine enlarged the Hippodrome. It is believed that the stadium could hold up to 100.000 people. Today the site is an elongated public garden. The road that runs around the garden directly follows the line of the chariot racing tracks.

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    The Hippodrome

    by boocik04 Written May 18, 2008

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    The Serpentine Column & The Column of Constantine
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    The Hippodrome served as an ancient racetrack where ancient chariot races, athletic competitions were held, and was centrally decorated with the Egyptian Obelisk and other famous columns. Its construction began in 203 by the Emperor Septimus Severus and it was subsequently enlarged by Constantine the Great. According to one estimation, it had a capacity of 100.000 people. After the Nika riots in 532, the chariot races lost their importance and in 1204, during the fourth crusade, it was greatly damaged. After the conquest of the city by the Ottoman Turks in 1453, the area served as one for horse trading. For that reason, the area is named At Meydani (horse square) today.

    There are three important monuments in the area:

    1. The Egyptian Obelisk -
    Built in the 16th century BC by the Pharaoh Tutmosis in Egypt. It was brought to Istanbul by boat in the 4th century AD.

    2. The Serpentine's Column -
    Originally erected in the Temple of Delphi in Greece, but taken to Istanbul. Until the 17th century there were three bronze snake heads projecting from the column, but they have since been lost. One can be seen in the archaeological museum.

    3. The Column of Constantine -
    Although it is believed that this dates from the 10th century, evidence shows that it was built earlier than that. Until 1204, it was covered by bronze and silver. When the Crusaders came to the area, they pulled off the bronze and silver, melted them down and made bullets and coins out of them.

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    Hippodrome of Constantinople

    by neodue Updated Mar 26, 2008

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    I am proud with that egyptian obelisk cause some of the importan cities have this
    and Istanbul might be the earliest one after the Egypt.

    Paris,Washington DC,Buenos Aires etc.Coppied Istanbul .
    To raise the image of his new capital, Constantine and his successors, especially Theodosius the Great, brought works of art from all over the empire to adorn it. Among these was the Tripod of Plataea, now known as the Serpent Column, cast to celebrate the victory of the Greeks over the Persians during the Persian Wars in the 5th century BC. Constantine ordered the Tripod to be moved from the Temple of Apollo at Delphi, and set in middle of the Hippodrome. The top was adorned with a golden bowl supported by three serpent heads. The bowl was destroyed or stolen during the Fourth Crusade. The serpent heads were destroyed as late as the end of the 17th Century, as many Ottoman miniatures show they were intact in the early centuries following the Turkish conquest of the city.[3] Parts of the heads were recovered and are displayed at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum. All that remains of the Delphi Tripod today is the base, known as the "Serpentine Column".

    Another emperor to adorn the Hippodrome was Theodosius the Great, who in 390 brought an obelisk from Egypt and erected it inside the racing track. Carved from pink granite, it was originally erected at the Temple of Karnak in Luxor during the reign of Tuthmosis III in about 1490 BC. Theodosius had the obelisk cut into three pieces and brought to Constantinople. Only the top section survives, and it stands today where Theodosius placed it, on a marble pedestal. The obelisk has survived nearly 3,500 years in astonishingly good condition.

    In the 10th century the Emperor Constantine Porphyrogenitus built another obelisk at the other end of the Hippodrome. It was originally covered with gilded bronze plaques, but they were sacked by Latin troops in the Fourth Crusade. The stone core of this monument also survives, known as the Walled Obelisk.

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