Istiklal Caddesi, Istanbul

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  • Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Istikal Caddesi - The Pulse of Modern Istanbul

    by Mikebb Updated Feb 22, 2012

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    Istikal Caddesi
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    We walked Istikal Caddesi on a fine day whilst enjoying Istanbul prior to joining the Turkey coach tour. We had accommodation in the Sultanahmet district and took public transport to Taskim on the Asian side. The light rail (tram) took us to the Galata Bridge where from memory I think we changed to another tram which took us to the last stop where we caught the funicular rail through the tunel up to Taskim. An interesting trip which all up took about 40 minutes.

    Istikal Caddesi was rebuilt during 1870 in glamorous Art Nouveau style and many of those buildings remain today in this 3km long pedestrianized street. The street is the pulse of modern Istanbul with restaurants, cafes, high end fashion shops, arcades, cinemas, street vendors, fish markets etc etc.

    A nice place to visit anytime, however we liked the evening scene when we returned for dinner after we had returned from our Turkey coach tour.

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Istiklal Caddesi

    by traveloturc Updated Jan 7, 2007

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    istiklal caddesi
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    Istiklal means independence ..La grande Rue de Pera in the old times...Beyoglu and the Istiklal Street are two popular places among people from every age category, from teenagers to elderly people. The Istiklal Street is the meeting place for the lovers and friends. The district starts with the statute of Ataturk in Taksim Square. The prominent landmark of Taksim Square is the Marmara Hotel, a tall building which is another meeting place for the people. The Istiklal Street is a pedestrian street which is approximately 3-4 km. long. The cobber stone street reminds one of the old days...There are cozy cafés, restaurants, shops, bookstores, movie theaters, music stores on this street. Most of the movie theaters are located here. There are small back streets where you can discover little but friendly cafés. When one comes to the halfway of the street, the area changes its name to "Galatasaray" which is also the name of the Junior High School which gives training in French and the major soccer team of Turkey.Dont forget to try the nostalgic tramway.

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  • muratkorman's Profile Photo

    Istiklal Caddesi

    by muratkorman Updated May 2, 2011

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    Crowded as usual
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    This is one of the most famous avenues in Istanbul, Turkey, visited by nearly 3 million people in a single day over the course of weekends. Located in the historic Beyoglu district, it is an elegant pedestrian street, approximately three kilometers long, except some interventions by perpendicular roads and the tram. You will always find it crowded even in the middle of the night. Lots of bars, cafes, restaurants and shops are located on this famous street. It starts from Taksim Square and ends at Tünel which is also the route of the tram. The busy part is between Taksim Square and Galatasaray. No tourist leaves Istanbul without visiting here at least once.

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Istiklal Caddesi

    by maykal Written Feb 7, 2006

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    The top end of Istiklal Caddesi, Istanbul

    A visiting friend dismissed Istanbul's main shopping street as being "just like Oxford Street", but Istiklal Caddesi is so much more than that. Taksim Square is the obvious starting point, a huge expanse of, well, nothing but buses and taxis and cars and people, flanked by a park and a huge hotel. Istiklal Caddesi starts here, just follow the crowds and you'll get the right street. Look out for the Greek Aya Triada church on your right, and the French Cultural Centre on the left. Istiklal Caddesi is pedestrianised, but this being Turkey, it doesn't mean there are no cars, just less cars! Cafes, clothes shops, music stores and bookshops line the street, lotto sellers and midye stalls (stuffed mussels) lurk in the shadows. Music, whether Turkish, Greek, Arabic or American, wafts out of shops, almost drowning out the sound of the odd busker. The top end of Istiklal Caddesi is where you'll find all your big names, while further down the shops become a bit more quirky. Look out for the famous Beyoglu chocolate stalls, selling tablets of the brown stuff with hazelnuts for 3YTL. Halfway down, you reach a semi-square, with the prestigious Galata Lisesi on one side, the Beyoglu Fish Market and Cicek Pasaji on the other. More about those later. The street turns slightly to the left, but doesn't stop. The buildings are now even grander than they were at the top end of the street, several of them hiding European consulates. Keep your eyes peeled for the three hidden churches. A final twist, and you're at Tunel Square, where you can either take the shortest ever underground train ride to Karakoy down below, or ride the quaint red tram which will take you all the way back up to Taksim! In the daytime, Istiklal is full of shoppers. As the sun goes down, everyone comes out just to stroll up and down, maybe stopping for ice cream or tea on the way. At night, hundreds of cafes, restaurants, cafes and clubs make sure Istiklal Caddesi is still thronging with people until the early hours of the morning.

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Visually very interesting street

    by fachd Written May 13, 2008

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    People strolling in the street bopping their heads
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    Istiklal cadessi is visually very interesting street. The street is now reserved for pedestrian. Tourist from all over the world, they all intertwine with the locals. They are sea of faces with many expressions. You can see people strolling in the street bopping their heads, jiving to the bell sound coming out loudly from the tram and the human traffics dodging the sound. It has a central tramline that runs from the beginning right to the water edge. Many of the buildings architecture is of western influence.

    Both sides of the street are never ending shops catering from basic eateries, colourful bar, boutiques, banks, theatres, fancy restaurants to foreign embassy. The street is about three km long and is on the north side of the Golden Horn. It takes quite awhile to explore the length of the street.

    I think Ystiklal Cadessi is a safe street with visible uniform police patrolling the street.

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  • neodue's Profile Photo

    ISTIKLAL CADDESI (STREET)

    by neodue Written Mar 27, 2008

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    Grand Rue de PERA or CADDE I KEBIR ottoman Turkish.Grand Road.Rebublicans change the name of the street made it INDEPENDENCE road in Ottoman Turkish.

    This road located in BEYOGLU district.You can see on the Street Signs.When the Ottomans Conquered the CONSTANTINOPLE there was WALLED CITY Constantinople and Walled GALATA town.GALATA was the colony of GENOVIAN Italians.

    When the Ottomans Controlled CONSTANTINOPLE (BYZANTIUM) they have located in OLD city (SULTANAHMED)and Turkized that part.They didnt touch this bit of the City.

    GALATA stayed COLONIAL ,EUROPEAN and different then Old Istanbul.You cant see huge mosques or Ottoman Buildings in this Part.Except KASIMPASA GREAT MOSQUE.

    So this part was garden and forest in 16th century.Ottomans never gave permission the Christians otr Foreign Chrisitian Embasies or Companies Habitate in Constantinople.

    They gave permission For these buildings in GALATA and PERA.When Europe became the centre of the world after 17th Century Galata and PERA followed it and Turned a European Faceof Istanbul.

    Modern huge Buildings,Huge Churches and Elegance European life Style.French style restaurants ,french names,First Subway system,Tram,Electricty etc.

    I show you details of this part of Istanbul

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  • The heart of European Istanbul

    by mavi-tr Written Mar 27, 2004

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    Istiklal Caddesi (Or Independence Avenue) is a very long street and it's the centre of nightlife, shopping, eating, cinema going and basically everything else you need for a really great time..

    You can see all walks of life here but in the weekends and evenings it's floaded with younger people in search of great night life.

    A small tram runs from Taksim Square (the bustling transportation hub from which Istiklal leads off), down to Tunnel Square, which is the other end of Istiklal. It's a long walk but really worth it as there are very few cars, the atmosphere is wonderful and there's lots to see and do. Cinemas, nightclubs (gay & straight), shops, restaurants, theatres, galleries and cultural centres can all be found here as well as 3 churches, a mosque and several grand consulates.

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  • iaint's Profile Photo

    walkabout

    by iaint Updated Jan 30, 2010

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    early Sunday morning

    Istiklal Caddesi is one of the city's main arteries. It is mainly pedestrianised, but watch out for trams, police on scooters, delivery vans etc.

    Start at Taksim Square and walk southwest. Eventually, if you go past the end of the street you'll come to the Galata Tower, and then the Golden Horn. Do it in daylight so it's not too busy and you can look around properly. Then go back and do it at night when its choc a bloc! I'm told it's busy all night.

    You'll find routine clothes shops, small specialist shops (eg bookshops), coffee shops and restaurants.

    Then you have the consulates (Greek, Russian, Swedish), the Mevlevi monastery and the Galatasaray lycee.

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    "Independence Avenue" at Beyoglu

    by mindcrime Updated May 11, 2011

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    tram at Istiklal caddesi
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    Our hotel was at Beyoglu, near Istiklal Street, so we took our first walk there and we got shocked of the people that were there, it was late at night it looked like a parade or something! The amazing thing is that it is like that every night!

    Istiklal is a big pedestrian street(almost 2km) that connects Taksim Square with the Tunnel. In fact, it’s the main street in the European Quarter and it’s full of shops, cafes, restaurants etc It is always full of people (day and night, locals and tourists) and can spend all your day going up and down if you stop to eat or shop. Although policemen patrol the cobble stone streets take extra care about pickpockets.

    Don’t forget to use or just take pics of the picturesque nostalgic tram that runs up and down Istiklal from Taksim to Tunel.

    My suggestion is not to shop the first day because you will return here many times as we did. So, starting from Taxim, check out some stores you find interesting, look for some Turkish liras at Exchange Stores, eat at one of the restaurants at Cikek Pasaji(it used to be flower market once, cicek means flower), buy sweets at Saray, admire the gates of Galatasaray School (pic 3), go into a small alley and enjoy a tea, most of the side streets hide small pubs or restaurants (pic 4) or visit the French district which is full of old but restored houses that now are cafes, restaurants etc. Now continue your way down to Galata Tower…

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  • mariocibelli's Profile Photo

    Passeggiata alla Turca

    by mariocibelli Written Oct 18, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tunel Tram, Istanbul

    Great way to get away from Sultanahmet and enjoy Istanbul as the locals do. There is so much going on in the two kilometers between the Tunel funicular stop and Taksim that you can spend a day or two here. My favorite things to do here are:

    1. Eat a Asure (Turkish pudding) at Saray.
    2. Have tea and smoke a nargileh at one of the numerous tea shops that line the sidestreets and play backgammon.
    3. Explore the sidestreets.
    4. Visit the Pasa Palace hotel, a little bit of a let-down after you find out that Agatha Christie did not write Orient Express here and that room 401 really wan't where she stayed but the atmosphere is interesting, frozen in time.
    5. Just walk up and down the pedestrianized avenue as everyone else does.
    6. Take in a film at one of the numerous cinemas lining the avenue.

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  • mardaska's Profile Photo

    Istiklal Caddesi

    by mardaska Written Sep 5, 2003

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    Istiklal with friends

    It was called the Grand Rue de Pera. It was the main street of the European Quarter of the city and the place where most foreign embassies were located.

    Nowadays it is the one of the most important shopping streets of Istanbul. It is a pedestianized street with shops, restaurants and coffee shops.

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  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Arcades of Istiklal Caddesi - Avrupa Pasaji

    by Mikebb Updated Feb 29, 2012

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    Avrupa Pasaji Arcade  - Istiklal Caddesi
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    We walked through several arcades off Istikal Caddesi , all offered something different and provided some sort of escape from the crowded street. The arcades can be crowded but there is always a small shop, cafe or fruit stall providing a rest spot.

    You will know you have arrived at Avrupa Pasaji when you see the fish retailer next to the entrance.

    Expect to see something different.

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  • Lalique's Profile Photo

    Turkish Arbat, Monmartre, etc.

    by Lalique Written Jan 15, 2004

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    Istiklal

    This street and all Pera and Beyoglu area shouldn't be missed from ones trip to Istanbul.

    It's the landmark of the city as Topkapi or Blue Mosque. The pedestrian street with single-track, which is used by the old trams to run to and from, is always vibrant with life, music, tourist buzz and locals. It leads to Taksim square, where one can feel the puls of Istanbul life non-stop.

    This time I managed to see it in snow.... still vibrant.....

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  • manuelEB's Profile Photo

    Busiest street in Istanbul

    by manuelEB Updated Sep 19, 2003

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    Women ass-ets

    Oiran (Geisha_Girl) is helping me

    She said: Until you have time to write about Istanbul, let the "serious" travellers about the poetry that this city has inspired. She foud for a me these verses by Orhan Veli Kanik...Hope you enjoy them

    I do apologize. Just have noticed that bymistake I delete a segment of the poetry. I will check my files and will put it together again,

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  • manuelEB's Profile Photo

    busiest street

    by manuelEB Updated Sep 19, 2003

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    SAturday 7 pm

    Saturday 7 in the evening. Look how busy is this boulevard. A tram runs from Taksim Square down to the Tunnel, close to Galata Tower. I didn't see the tram that Saturday evening, and can not imagine a traffic different to
    "human traffic" in here. You see the girls... Beautiful, elegant... and killing smiles (not shown in the pictures, go ther and get yours. Pictures, I mean).

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