Istiklal Caddesi, Istanbul

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  • Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Istiklal Caddesi

    by SirRichard Written May 20, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This commercial street is the main avenue in the modern part of Istanbul. Always full of people (mostly youngs), here you can find modern shops, bars, cafeterias, restaurants. From Benetton to MacDonalds, here you will feel the pulse of the modern Istanbul.

    Istiklal with its tram

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  • neodue's Profile Photo

    Beyoglu ,Istiklal Street( Grand Rue de Pera)

    by neodue Updated Oct 10, 2007

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    During the 16th century a son of a Venetian Ducat built a Large palace in that area with the permission of Magnifecent Suleyman.from that time the name of the area is Beyoglu(the son of Ducat or Sir)
    and also Locals calls "Pera".at the end of the 16th century ,permission to build embassies in this area was granted to westerners who decided to permenantly keep a permenant mission in the Ottoman capital.
    Beyoglu was thus transformed into a region where the istanbulites could capture a glimpse of the European life style.
    In order to make a clear description of this region , please check the photos :)

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  • photonina's Profile Photo

    Istiklal

    by photonina Written Nov 27, 2005

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    The popular street of the city... mostly for turists... style is europian... but still with asian mixture ;) the only transport that you'll see there on the street is old style (red) tram. There are different kind of shops, butiques, cafes, fastfoods, galeries, even catholic church on the street.. the street is full of people during the day and it's getting quiet there only after 12pm. But there are very interesting old nerrow streets around there.. where life is continuing even after 12pm. don't hasitate to take a walk _ you'll find a lot interesting, lot of little and big, asian or europian, expensive and less expensive restaurants, bars, stores there... you'll find it even interesting for to just take a walk ...

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  • ophiro's Profile Photo

    The french street - La rue Francaise

    by ophiro Written Aug 5, 2005

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    La rue Francaise , the French street , is a small street with quiet restaurants.
    The street is in slope so the walk in the street is climbing stairs (or going down).

    The street is very close to Galatasaray school and to Istiklal street (just turn left after Galatasaray school).

    The french street - La rue Francaise

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  • Martin_S.'s Profile Photo

    Istiklal Street, busiest in Istanbul

    by Martin_S. Updated Jan 4, 2009

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    Istiklal Street may be the busiest in Istanbul. The only place we encountered crowds close to this was in the Grand Bazaar. You can find just about anything here on this street, from the simple "fast foods" like the Kumpi, to the fancy resturants and coffee shops frequented by the local Yuppies. All the name brand stores you can find here for the designer clothes as well as places galore to eat...also the surrounding streets on both sides seem to have been taken over by restaurants. There is also the Cicek Pasaji (the Flower Passage) which is a complete indoor dining area, a "passage" crowded with restaurants on both sides. We loved some of the small non touristy type restaurants that were found just off the street, such as the one shown in the last photo which put BUCKETS of bread on the table, not a typical tourist spot.
    Also hidden behind a iron bar gate is the Church of St. Antoine, if you have time go take a look, we could not go in as they were having services when we arrived.

    Crowds on Istiklal Street, Istanbul, Turkey Cicek Pasaji, Istiklal Street, Istanbul, Turkey St. Antoine, Istiklal Street, Istanbul, Turkey St. Antoine, Istiklal Street, Istanbul, Turkey Bread on tables, Istiklal Street, Istanbul, Turkey
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  • seasonedveteran's Profile Photo

    European Style Street with Turkish Delights

    by seasonedveteran Written May 2, 2008

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    This is a wonderful street to go shopping in, for clothes with latest sexy fashions, grab a quick donor, or just enjoy a stroll where no cars travel. It is a very broad street, and i would recommend taking the tram ride which cuts through the center. That in itself is a piece of history since it remains from the time istanbul began its movement towards europeanization, and modernization. branching off these streets is You can find dancing nightclubs, live guitar shows, some belly dancing, traditional turkish water pipe smoking shops, irish bars, italian restaurants, and rock bars. you get the picture. and all this amidst the call to prayer in arabic. absolutely contrasting, but wonderful.

    This street had Taksim square at one end, where dozens of buses meet and head out towards massive istanbul districts. Any given time, public shows are performed on an outdoor stage at night. While i was there, young children were dancing in german style clothes, and it was just great. Taksim square has the liberation monument with very symbolic statues showing the sacrfices they made during WWI and WWII with soldiers and revolutionaries like the founding Hero Ataturk.

    At the other end you will reach the dazzling blue waters of the golden horn and have the Award Winning Photograph opportunity vantage point of the sultanahmnet area skyline photo. This is definately one of the best places to capture the beauty of istanbul's blue mosque and hill landscape surrounded by water. I was lucky and snowbird airplanes were circling over the water, which really made it magically dreamlike.

    At night, there is heart shaped christmas lights hanging over this amazing avenue. Please see this place, but realize the true unique istanbul character lies in sultanahmnet and the historic topkapi palace, hagia sofia, mosques and the bosphorus. I love istanbul.

    the beautiful street with people enjoying strollin Taksim square monument

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  • Lunamagica's Profile Photo

    Istiklal Caddesi

    by Lunamagica Updated Dec 8, 2002

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    No matter what you are in Istanbul for, you'll want to take the time to walk up and down Istiklal Caddesi, formerly known, in more decadent times, as the "Grand Rue de Pera"....... be SURE to check out every one of its side streets............ and enjoy the avenue's comings and goings, tram included (the tram takes you from the Tünel "metro" stop at the bottom of the avenue up to Taksim square and back again....).........

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  • Sharon's Profile Photo

    Istiklal Street area

    by Sharon Written Oct 2, 2006

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    Definitely what you do in Taksim area is walking at the famose Istiklal Street. Its a street full of shops restaurants cafe's and bars, it can be nice for the night if you want to go out but during day time its so crowded and there's just nothing to do there to my opinion unless if you're into shopping or maybe a short stop for a coffee / drink. There's a mass of people walking at all directions, bumping into you and never ever even say Sorry, thats definitely the first time i saw something like that.

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  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Updated May 23, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    İstiklal Avenue or Istiklal Street (Turkish: İstiklâl Caddesi) is one of the most famous avenues in Istanbul, visited by nearly 3 million people in a single day over the course of weekends. Located in the historic Beyoglu (Pera) district, it is an elegant pedestrian street, approximately three kilometers long, which houses exquisite boutiques, music stores, bookstores, art galleries, cinemas, theatres, libraries, cafés, pubs, night clubs with live music, historical patisseries, chocolateries and restaurants.

    The avenue, surrounded by late Ottoman era buildings (mostly from the 19th and early 20th centuries) that were designed with the Neo-Classical, Neo-Gothic, Renaissance Revival, Beaux-Arts, Art Nouveau and First Turkish National Architecture (Birinci Millî Mimarî Akımı) styles; as well as a few Art Deco style buildings from the early years of the Turkish Republic, and a number of more recent examples of modern architecture; starts from the medieval Genoese neighbourhood around Galata Tower and ultimately leads up to Taksim Square.

    Galatasaray Square is located at approximately the center of the avenue and is home to one of the finest educational institutions established in Turkey at the time of the Ottoman Empire; originally known as the Galata Sarayı Enderun-u Humayunu (Galata Palace Imperial School) and today known as Galatasaray High School.

    In the historic Karakoy (Galata) district towards the southern end of the avenue, it is possible to see the world's second-oldest subway station, generally known and referred to as simply Tunel (The Tunnel) which entered service in 1875. Moreover, the German High School of Istanbul (Deutsche Schule Istanbul in German, Ozel Alman Lisesi in Turkish) is also located near Tunel.

    The cosmopolitan avenue is surrounded by an array of historical and politically significant buildings, such as the Cicek Pasajı (Flower Passage) where small, intimate restaurants and taverns are found; Balık Pazarı (The Fish Market); the Roman Catholic churches of Santa Maria Draperis and S. Antonio di Padova; the Greek Orthodox Haghia Triada; the Armenian Uc Horan (among many other churches); several synagogues; mosques; academic institutions established by various European nations such as Austria, France, Germany and Italy in the 19th century; and consulates (former embassies before 1923) of several nations including France, Greece, the Netherlands, Russia, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

    A historic red tram in front of the Beyoglu station of Tünel (1875) at the southern end of İstiklal Avenue.

    During the Ottoman period, the avenue was called Cadde-i Kebir (Grand Avenue) and was a popular spot for Ottoman intellectuals, also becoming a center for European foreigners and the local Italian and French Levantines who referred to it as Grande Rue de Péra. When 19th century travelers referred to Constantinople (today, Istanbul) as the Paris of the East, they were mentioning the Grande Rue de Péra (İstiklal Caddesi) and its half-European, half-Asian culture. With the declaration of the Republic on October 29, 1923, the avenue's name was changed to İstiklal (Independence) for commemorating the triumph at the Turkish War of Independence.

    The avenue briefly fell from grace in the 1970s and 1980s, with its old Istanbulite inhabitants moving elsewhere, and its side streets – then stereotyped with their bars and bordellos – being populated by migrants from the rural areas of Anatolia. However, during the late 1980s and early 1990s, a massive restoration process took place (master-planned and executed by the Municipality; including the restoration of the historic buildings, new pavements for full pedestrianization, and the reinstallation of the historic trams), bringing the avenue its old charm and popularity. İstiklal Avenue once again became the center of fine arts and leisure in Istanbul, with real estate prices skyrocketing as a result. Numerous new art galleries, bookstores, cafés, pubs, restaurants, shops and hotels were opened.

    The venues around the avenue became the host of many international art festivals, such as the annual Istanbul Film Festival.

    A "must see" for your Istanbul visit to spend the day and night ... :)

    Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR Istiklal Street, Istanbul, TR
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  • ophiro's Profile Photo

    Istiklal Street

    by ophiro Written Jul 27, 2005

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    Istiklal Cadessi is one of the most famous streets in Istanbul.
    Istiklal means Independence.

    The street is on the European side and it is from Taksim square to almost Galata tower.

    There are a lot of local people and also tourists walking between all the shops , restaurants , street vendors and the TUNEL - one of the oldest subways in europe.

    The begining of Istiklal street

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  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    ISHTIKAL CADDESI

    by mtncorg Updated Nov 20, 2011

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    This is Turkey’s version of Park Avenue, Strøget, and Calle Florida. Running almost 3 km in length from Taksim Square to the Tünel Square, the avenue is lined with buildings from the late Ottoman period. Elegant shops, restaurants, bookstores, nightclubs, consulates, churches and some of the best schools in Turkey can be found along the way. There is a historic tram that putters the street’s length. Ishtikal means Independence, the name that was given to this avenue following the 1923 conclusion of the Turkish War of Independence – the former Ottoman name was Cadde i Kebir/Grand Avenue.

    Late night thins the crowds on the busy street The old tram putters down the street
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  • Olya777's Profile Photo

    Taste of France in Istanbul

    by Olya777 Updated Mar 30, 2009

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    With its steep stairs, Cezayir (Algeria) Street crossed with Hayriye Street which lies just behind Galatasaray High School in Beyoglu (which is in the middle of Istiklal street). Some people call it "French Street" another, Algerian Street. whatever name you prefer, it is an absolutely charming adorable area

    The French street is a great place to have a good time by listening to the French chansons and it is also possible to find restaurants offering very special tastes from the French cuisine; cafes, bars, wine houses along with souvenir and second hand shops.

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  • June.b's Profile Photo

    The Center of the Universe - Taksim

    by June.b Updated Feb 9, 2008

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    The magnet that attracts all people from all walks of life in millions daily in Istanbul is called "Istiklal Cadessi".

    The center of the whole Istanbul universe is Taksim Square. (any argument on this?)

    Istiklal Cadessi is a long avenue running from Taksim square (Republic Monument) until the Galata Tower. Located in Beyoglu District, this avenue is so full of people everyday, chaotic at times but fun just to walk along and observe the rush and hush of Istanbul.

    It’s lined with lots of boutiques, shops, restaurants, fastfood chains, cinemas, and everything that you could probably want to see. This is also the street where you would probably get conned. So take a bagful of wits with you.

    At night, it’s lively with all bars and places to chillout, live music & performances.

    Sit on the second level/floor of any restaurant overlooking the avenue below and just watch all the people that goes back and forth, enjoy the scenes. Or walk along and checkout historical building and façade, sip a cup of hot beverage or cold beer or dine at the elegant 19th century Çiçek Pasajý or Flower Passage. If you’re into seafood, checkout those seafood restaurants at Balik Pasaji.

    The Roman Catholic Church of S. Antonio Di Padova is near the Galatasaray Square, and there are lots of other places of worships – greek orthodox, synagogue, mosques.

    Walk until you reach the tunnel onto the Galata Tower.

    Once you reached the tunnel and wanted to get back to Taksim Square where you started but just damned tired and jostle through throng of people… don’t worry, there’s a solution – a streetcar named desire (no, that was a movie) – the historical tram that run from the beginning til the end of Istiklal Caddessi, for less than a dollar.

    Istiklal Cadessi comes after you have checked most historical sights in Sultanahmet – at least that’s how most tourists’ itinerary goes…well, except when I first came to the city in 2005 when my first day started here, as the hotel I booked is located few meters from the tunnel.

    Historical Tram Republic Monument
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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    la Grande Rue de Pera

    by MM212 Updated Feb 27, 2010

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    Under its previous name "la Grande Rue de Pera", İstiklal Caddesi was the main thoroughfare of the neighbourhood once also known as Pera. During the Ottoman Empire, foreigners were not allowed to reside in Constantinople proper, which was the older part of the city around Hagia Sophia, so Pera (in today's Beyoğlu) developed as a separate suburb of the city for the various foreign communities. As European influence increased, Pera became inhabited mostly by Western Europeans who built their European-style residential buildings, churches and embassies. The result today is a district that is distinctively more European in character than the older part of Istanbul. Pera's importance diminished substantially when Atatürk transferred the capital to Ankara, obliging the embassies to follow. The sumptuous embassies are now mere consulates and the name Pera is fading into memory, though the churches, the beautiful architecture (see photos), and the Pera Palas Hotel all remain as a reminder of a bygone era. İstiklal Caddesi, which means Independence Street, now a pedestrianised street, has experienced a revival and is where everything hot and trendy in Istanbul occurs.

    Crowds on İstiklal Caddesi - Jan 2010 İstiklal Caddesi - Aug 2004 Architecture along İstiklal Caddesi - Aug 04 Euro-Islamic mix - Aug 04 Turbaned man! Aug 04
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  • cherrytomato's Profile Photo

    Istiklal

    by cherrytomato Written Jan 3, 2009

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    Istiklal is probably one of the most famous Istanbul streets. It's a very hectic place with lots of energy. It's always full with people even in the morning. There are lots of shops and cafes. But not only shopping attracts people. Here you can also find a beautiful Catholic Church and old Embassy buildings.

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