Kalenderhane Camii, Istanbul

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  • Plan of the mosque
    Plan of the mosque
    by traveloturc
  • INTERRIOR PHOTOS OF CURRENT CHURCH (MOSQUE)
    INTERRIOR PHOTOS OF CURRENT CHURCH...
    by neodue
  • REMARKS ON THE SURVIVING BUILDING
    REMARKS ON THE SURVIVING BUILDING
    by neodue
  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Kalenderhane Mosque

    by traveloturc Written Jun 5, 2013
    Kalenderhane Mosque
    1 more image

    It is assumed that this structure was built as a church between 9th AD and 12th AD. After several centuries from conquer, it was turned into a mosque.
    Fatih Sultan Mehmet gave this structure to a dervish in Ottoman army, his name was ‘Kalender’ and then the structure was called ‘Kalenderhane’.
    In the 18th century the church, which was turned into a mosque by order of Maktul Beşir Ağa , was also used as a monastery. It was firstly turned into a Turkish bath, then a church and a small Islamic monastery.
    In the collapse period of the Ottoman Empire, Kalenderhane Mosque became almost an abandoned structure. After seven years of the proclamation of the republic, it had a strike of lightning and became highly ruined. In the year of 1966 after a 6-year-amendment, the mosque was opened to worship.
    In the last quarter of 20th century, Kalenderhane Mosque hosted an excavation work carried out by the cooperation of Harvard University and Istanbul Technical University. The mosque had brick and stone walls which have faithful ornaments. If you do not visit Kalenderhane Mosque in Istanbul tour, be sure that you will miss a lot of things.

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  • WulfstanTraveller's Profile Photo

    Kalenderhane Camii (Mosque)

    by WulfstanTraveller Written Feb 23, 2009
    Kalenderhane Camii
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    This interesting mosque, formerly a Byzantine church, is in the Vefa neighbourhood and abutting the south side of the eastern portion of the Aqueduct of Valens. It is just west of Beyazit and the Istanbul University. The current structure was apparently built by the Comnenos dynsaty in the 12th century but on the site of a much earlier bath hous and an older church. Like many churches in the city, the building was turned into a Catholic church when the westerners took the city in the 4th Crusade, converted back to an Orthodox church when the Byzantines retook the city, and then converted into a mosque. Specifically, it was given to the Kalender dervishes from whom it takes its current name.

    The inside still has the striking panels of different colourred marble and other stone lining much of the interior walls.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • neodue's Profile Photo

    Theotokos Kyriotissa Church (KALENDERHANE CAMII)

    by neodue Written May 20, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    OUTSIDE PHOTO OF THE CHURCH
    4 more images

    This another amazing Byzantine Church in Istanbul.It s desapread between Istanbul University Buildings but still you can see it s unique Architecture.

    You can see the some part of the building demolished and basic contruction still remaning on the gorund.

    The church has been converted a mosque but stil you can feel and see it s been build as a orthodox church.

    It s very clean and nice but still you can feel that some of the part of the church renovated or demolished very badly.

    Marble plated walls are very impressive also you can see the Muslim Mihrab showing the Kibla
    .
    Must see and non touristy places.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Kalenderhane Camii

    by MM212 Updated Oct 10, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kalenderhane Camii - Aug 04
    4 more images

    One of many Byzantine churches converted into mosques after the conquest of the Ottomans, Kalenderhane Mosque is thought to have been the Church of the Kyriotissa Monastery (the monastery is no longer existent). It dates from the 11th century, but incorporates remains of older churches built as early as the 5th century AD. Restorations and excavations in the 1960s revealed the identity of the church, which had been forgotten over time and was thought to be a different church. The conversion of the church into a mosque by the Ottomans makes the interior particularly interesting, combining Islamic motifs with Byzantine designs (see photos). For a period in its past, this church was also consecrated by the Crusaders as a Catholic church.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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