Roman Aqueduct, Istanbul

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  • Valens Aqueduct
    Valens Aqueduct
    by Ewingjr98
  • Valens Aqueduct
    Valens Aqueduct
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Valens Aqueduct
    Valens Aqueduct
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Bozdogan Kemeri ( Valens Aqueduct )

    by traveloturc Updated May 24, 2013

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    Altough the exact date of its construction has been lost in history, the Valens Aqueduct, also known as the Hadrianus Aqueduct, is a legacy of the Late Roman and Early Byzantine era. Over the centuries, the structure fell into disrepair and eventually to ruins, until the conquest of the city, when it was restored in order to deploy its original function: namely, to distribute water in periods of regional shortage.
    It is believed that when first constructed, the aqueduct was more than 1 kilometer in lenght. Over the years, additions have been made, although the point at which the structure was given its Turkish name "Bozdogan" is unknown.
    Today, the preponderance of the once sprawling aqueduct has largely been destroyed, with the notable exception of the remains found on the Sarachane Ataturk Boulevard. In 1988, the Municipality of Istanbul decided to restore this piece of history, which also bears witness to Ottoman design. Being the oldest aqueduct in Istanbul, Valens has served the city for more than 15 centuries as its most important water source.

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Valens aqueduct

    by Raimix Updated Feb 7, 2012

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    Aqueduct was constructing during the reign of Emperor Valens in 4th century BC. Later it was reconstructed several times, the last one – in the second half of 17th century. After some centuries it was badly damaged. The best survived part of it is located over Ataturk Boulevard.

    Nowadays aqueduct is about 970 meters long, but most parts are in ruin. It was the first aqueduct have seen in my trips.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Valens Aqueduct

    by Ewingjr98 Written Apr 10, 2011

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    Valens Aqueduct

    The Valens Aqueduct, built by Roman Emperor Valens in the late 4th Century AD, was a part of the major water-providing system of Constantinople, now Istanbul. This aqueduct, along with dozens of others, formed a 250 km network of water supply canals and aqueducts feeding Constantinople, which was the largest water supply system of the time. The water was channeled into the city via these aqueducts and canals, then stored in three open reservoirs and hundreds of underground cisterns, such as the landmark Basilica Cistern.

    The impressive structure is 921 meters long, crossing the small valley between Istanbul University and the Fatih Mosque. One of the most impressive images is that of Atatürk Bulvarı boulevard passing under the arches of the aqueduct. I didn't see this amazing sight, but I saw the eastern-most terminus of the aqueduct near Istanbul University.

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    Aqueduct of Valens

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2010

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    The Aqueduct of Valens dates from around 368 AD during the reign of Roman Emperor Valens and was the major water-providing system of medieval Constantinople and Roman Byzantium. Restored by several Ottoman Sultans, it is one of the most important landmarks of the city and can best be seen where it crosses the major Ataturk Bulvari road. The surviving section is 921 meters long, about 50 meters less than the original length. Water from the hills was stored in three open reservoirs and over a hundred underground cisterns, such as the Basilica Cistern, with a total capacity of over 1 million cubic meters.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Valens Aqueduct-Bozdogan Kemeri

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated May 12, 2009

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    The Valens Aqueduct was the major water-providing system of medieval Constantinople. Restored by several Ottoman Sultans, it is one of the most important landmarks of the city.
    The aqueduct stands in the quarter of Fatih, and spans the valley between the hills occupied today by the Istanbul University and the Fatih The Atatürk Bulvarý boulevard passes under its arches.

    The Aqueduct of Valens had a length of 971 meters and a maximum height of ca. 29 meters with a constant slope of 1:1000. Arches 1-40 and 46-51 belong to the time of Valens, arches 41-45 to Mustafa II, and those between 52 and 56 to Suleyman I. Arches 18-73 have a double order, the others a single order.

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  • WulfstanTraveller's Profile Photo

    Aqueduct of Valens

    by WulfstanTraveller Written Feb 23, 2009
    Aqueduct of Valens, Istanbul
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    In the central area of the historic peninsula of old Istanbul one can see the substantial remains of the arched bridge carrying a portion of the Roman aqueduct built by Emperor Valens in about 368 to provide the city, Constantinople, with water. The succeeding Romano-Byzantines continued to maintain and expand the sytem for a while, taking water from what is now called Belgrat Ormani (the Belgrade Forest) NW of the city. After it was neglected in the later Byzantine era, the Ottomans, staring with Fatih Mehmet, reqbuilt and expanded the water system repeatedly, including the arches in this area and taking more water from the Belgrade Forest. Eventually, it was replaced and by the end of the Ottoman empire portions were torn down and other facilities built to replace it. However, a large portion of the structure is still in existance, cutting along the Vefa neighbourhood. This includes the large, two-storey section crossing the large street called Ataturk Bulvari, as well as a smaller section, only 1 arch high, to the east in Vefa, with arches crossing several small streets. This portion in Vfea really adds to the atmospheric, ancient character and charm of this neighbourhood, with small streets running nder the ancient arches and buildings erected right next to the structure.

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  • Hopkid's Profile Photo

    Aqueduct of Valens

    by Hopkid Written Apr 20, 2008

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    This impressive structure was part of an aqueduct that brought water from an area north of Istanbul to a cistern that was located at what is now Beyazit Square. Thought to have been built by the Emperor Valens in the 4th century A.D. it remained in use as a water transport system until the 19th century when it ware replaced by a modern distribution system. The structure, which today towers over Ataturk Bulvan which goes through its openings, was built over a natural valley in order to preserve the hydraulic flow of this water transport system. It is in extremely good condition having been renovated and restored many times during its life. it is quite an interesting structure and among the most distinctive of Istanbul's many landmarks.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Valens Aqueduct (Bozdogan Kemeri)

    by MM212 Updated Oct 10, 2007

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    Roman aqueduct, Ottoman domes
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    Built by Emperor Constantine and completed by Valens in 378 AD, the Valens Aqueduct transported water to the heart of Constantinople for more than 1000 years. The structure later fell into disrepair, but the impressive section in the attached photos has been restored. A busy motorway traverses underneath the Aqueduct, giving it a dramatic presence in the city.

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    Valens Aqueduct

    by viddra Written Apr 12, 2007

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    The Aqueduct was constructed in 375 by the order of Roman Emperor Valens, thus the name Valens Aqueduct. It was repaired in the 6th, 8th and 11th centuries.

    It was used to transport the water from the Belgrade Forest to the fountain in Bayezid Square.

    The aqueduct is 20m high and was originally 1km long. Today it's only 800m long.

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  • midnight_mike's Profile Photo

    The Valens Aqueduct

    by midnight_mike Written Jun 15, 2006

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    One of Constantine’s goals as an administrator was to build a series of aqueducts that would provide a constant supply of fresh water to his capital. But the lofty municipal project did not come to fruition until 368 A.D., 31 years after his death.

    The Valens Aqueduct, named after the emperor who oversaw its completion, created problems for urban planners of modern Istanbul. Tearing down the aqueduct was not an option, but neither was rerouting the road. Fortunately, the arches are large enough to accommodate most vehicles, creating a unique driving experience.

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    Istanbul trafic jam

    by Luchonda Updated Sep 19, 2005

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    Roman aquaduct

    Remaining part of the Roman Aquaduct, very important that time to forsee the city of water
    In the pic, the incredible trafic jam in the city, almost day and night.
    The way to the hotel, only 15km, took more than 1 hour

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  • toshigiappone's Profile Photo

    Aqueduct of Valens

    by toshigiappone Written May 3, 2005
    Aqueduct of Valens

    This aqueduct is very impressive, when you walk down Ataturk Bul.. It is made of limestones.

    Well, it is not certain that this aqueduct was really built by Emperor Valens, killed by Goths in 378, but we can know that it was repaird in 1019, and even during Ottoman era it have been used as an aqueduct. Waters through this aqueduct passed through the Forum of Theodosius(Beyazit square) and then reached Great Palace at last.

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  • hadrian's Profile Photo

    Valens Aqueduct - Bozdogan Kemeri

    by hadrian Updated Oct 18, 2003

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    Valens Aqueduct

    Is part of an elaborated system for the water supplying for palaces and public fountains, the structure was 1000m length from out of remained 625m. It was built at the end of the IVth century by the emperor Valens. The aqueduct was functional until the end of the XIXth century !!! when it was replaced with a modern network of water distribution.
    ( it is placed in the area called Sarachane where Ataturk Boulevard crosses the aqueduct )

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  • mrclay2000's Profile Photo

    Aqueduct of Valens

    by mrclay2000 Written Mar 25, 2003

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    Aqueduct of Valens

    This typical Roman construction was the main watercourse for the city since its construction in the 4th century. Under the Ottomans, it still carried water until the 19th century. Today it is almost no more than a decorative arch over the highway leading to Pera.

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  • SirRichard's Profile Photo

    Valens Aqueduct

    by SirRichard Written May 14, 2003

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    The aqueduct

    This old roman aqueduct is one of the many roman ruins still standing in the city. You can get there walking from Divan Yolu and turning right at laleli Cami. Cars pass through nowadays.

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