Süleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul

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Mimar Sinan Cad, Suleymaniye,

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  • Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Updated May 21, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Suleymaniye Mosque is an Ottoman imperial mosque located on the Third Hill of Istanbul and is the "largest mosque" in the city, and one of the best-known sights of Istanbul.

    The Süleymaniye Mosque, built on the order of Sultan Süleyman (Süleyman the Magnificent), "was fortunate to be able to draw on the talents of the architectural genius of Mimar Sinan".

    The construction work began in 1550 and the mosque was finished in 1558.

    Here you can watch my HD Video of "Suleymaniye Mosque" ... :

    Video

    The Süleymaniye was ravaged by a fire in 1660 and was restored by Sultan Mehmed IV. Part of the dome collapsed again during the earthquake of 1766. Subsequent repairs damaged what was left of the original decoration of Sinan (recent cleaning has shown that Sinan experimented first with blue, before turning red the dominant color of the dome).

    Like the other imperial mosques in Istanbul, the mosque itself is preceded by a monumental courtyard on its west side. The courtyard at the Süleymaniye is of exceptional grandeur with a colonnaded peristyle with columns of marble, granite and porphyry. At the four corners of the courtyard are the four minarets, a number only allowable to mosques endowed by a sultan (princes and princesses could construct two minarets; others only one). The minarets have a total of 10 galleries (serifes), which by tradition indicates that Suleiman I was the 10th Ottoman sultan.

    In the garden behind the main mosque there are two mausoleums (türbe) including the tombs of sultan Suleiman I, his wife Haseki Hürrem, his daughter Mihrimah, his mother Dilaşub Saliha and his sister Asiye. The sultans Suleyman II, Ahmed II and Safiye, the daughter of Mustafa II, are also buried here.

    Just outside the mosque walls, to the north is the tomb of architect Sinan.

    A great Mosque and amazing architecture to see for your Istanbul visit ... :)

    Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, TR
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    Suleymaniye Camii

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Jul 27, 2012

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    Built in 1557 by the greatest of the Ottoman Sultans, Suleyman the great, this is Istanbul's largest Mosque. Despite this the mosque is hidden behind Istanbul University and takes some effort to find.

    Suleymaniye Camii Suleymaniye Camii Suleymaniye Camii Suleymaniye Camii Suleymaniye Camii
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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Suleimaniye mosque

    by Raimix Updated Feb 6, 2012

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    Suleiman mosque was finally constructed by famous Turkish architect Sinan in 1557. As some other mosques, the design idea was taken from famous Hagia Sophia. In 1660 it was reconstructed after big fire and more baroque details were added.

    Mosque is a home of sultan Suleiman I and his wife Rolexana tombs. Mosque is also famous for its size – it had a dome of 27.25 meters diameter and 53 meters high.

    This building is told to be one of the most famous sights in Istanbul, just a bit outside of historical Sultanahmet suburb.

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    SÜLEYMAN TÜRBE/TOMBS

    by mtncorg Written Nov 16, 2011

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    Süleyman I was the tenth and longest ruling sultan during the long Ottoman period, reigning from 1520 at an age of 26 until 1566 at an age of 71. He was the top dog of 16th century Europe presiding over an expanding realm, respected and feared by all. A true Renaissance man, Süleyman could speak four languages, as well as being held as an accomplished poet, goldsmith and legislator. A patron of the arts, he oversaw the apogee of the Ottoman Empire.

    Süleyman is also known for his lifelong attachment to a Ukrainian concubine, Hürrem Sultan, better known in the West as Roxelana. Breaking Ottoman tradition, Süleyman married her and she would give him plenty of moments of intrigue in ensuing years ensuring that her sons would succeed their father. His achievements “took many generations of decadent heirs to undo”!!

    Tomb of S��leyman I
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    SÜLEYMANIYE CAMII

    by mtncorg Written Nov 16, 2011

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    Because it is in Istanbul, many think that this mosque is the greatest work of the famous architect Mimar Sinan – they have not been to Edirne. That said, this is his greatest work in Stamboul and probably the most architecturally magnificent mosque in the city, as well. Süleyman was the longest reigning Ottoman emperor and his period represents the high point of the long run the empire enjoyed. He came to power in 1520 and by 1550, he had accomplished enough that he decided it was time for his own imperial mosque to be built. Seven years later the Süleymaniye complex was complete – four medrese, a kitchen for the poor, a hospital, a hamam, a caravanserai and a hospice for travelers in addition to the mosque and the eventual tombs for Süleyman and his wife Roxelana, daughter Mihrimah, mother, sister and two other sultans – Süleyman II and Ahemd II.

    Instead of isolated pillars supporting the massive dome, Sinan incorporated them into the walls of the building – half inside and half outside – hiding them behind colonnaded galleries. Unlike inside other imperial mosques – the interior is more restrained; no excess of Iznik tiles as in the Blue Mosque.

    S��leyman Camii on the hill above the Golden Horn The magnificent dome of the S��leymaniye Restrained interior with pillars integrated Here are the tiles! Men at their ablutions before entering the mosque
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  • muratkorman's Profile Photo

    An Ottoman Masterpiece

    by muratkorman Updated Jul 26, 2011

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    This mosque was built by Mimar Sinan in the name of Sultan Süleyman who is also known as Magnificent Süleyman. The construction took more than 7 years and finished in 1557. It is considered to be an architectural reply to Hagia Sofia. This mosque has a larger dome compared to Byzantine Hagia Sofia. The main dome is 53 meters high and has a diameter of 26.5 meters. At the time it was built, the dome was the highest in the Ottoman Empire, when measured from sea level, but still lower from its base than that of Hagia Sophia. It is the second largest mosque in Istanbul and it has 4 minarets. The tomb of Sultan Süleyman and the tomb of his beloved wife Hürrem Sultan are located in the cemetery next to the mosque. Major renovation works in the interior and exterior have been completed recently. You can watch the video I have uploaded to see the interior details of the mosque. The renovation works are still in progress for the surrounding complexes.

    Near the entrance Suleymaniye Mosque From a broader angle Interior 1 Interior 2
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  • albaaust's Profile Photo

    Most beautiful imperial mosque

    by albaaust Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Suleymaniye Imperial Mosque is regarded by many as the most beautiful of the imperial mosques and is where Suleymaniye and his wife Roxelane are buried. It was built between 1550-1557 by the architect Sinan . It is built on the crest of a hill and is conspicuous for its great size and has four minarets at each corner of the courtyard. Make sure you make a small donation at the entry to the mosque. 1ytl

    Inside the mosque
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  • al2401's Profile Photo

    Suleymaniye Mosque and Mausoleum

    by al2401 Updated Sep 14, 2010

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    The Suleymaniye Mosque is the next in size after the Sultanahmet Mosque and has a architectural plan similar to that of the Hagia Sophia. It was built between 1550-1557 upon the second hill of Istanbul.

    The mosque was under repair when I visited so I had to make do with a picture of the outside. I did enjoy a walk in the grounds and gardens including walking through the cemetry to the mausoleums of Suleyman and his wife Roxelan.

    These are designed as mini mosques and have all the design and decorative features including golden ceinings and beautiful Iznik tiles.

    There was no entry fee but a donation was appreciated.

    Suleymaniye Mosque Dome of Suleyman's mausoleum Suleyman's tomb Beautiful Iznik tiles - Suleyman mausoleum Classic calligraphy - Suleyman mausoleum
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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Süleymaniye Camii

    by MM212 Updated Mar 2, 2010

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    Undoubtedly Istanbul's greatest mosque, Süleymaniye Camii, was completed in 1557 AD by the famous imperial architect Sinan on the orders of Soliman the Magnificent (or Süleyman in Turkish). The mosque was part of a large complex fulfilling many other functions, including a hospital, school, hammam, caravanserai and a charitable foundation. The mosque also contains the tomb of Süleyman the Magnificent and his beloved Roxelana. The location on top of one of the seven hills of Istanbul and dominating the city makes the mosque visible from all over the city and the Bosphorus, thus definining the skyline for the past five centuries. This monumental mosque is Mimar Sinan's grandest work in Istanbul. For more photos of this architectural masterpiece, go to the travelogue "The Mosque of Soliman the Magnificent".

    S��leymaniye Camii - Aug 04 The Cemetery The Domes - Aug 04
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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Mimar Sinan Türbesi

    by MM212 Updated Mar 2, 2010

    For all the architectural wonders he built, the imperial architect, Mimar Sinan, chose to be buried in a rather modest tomb (türbe) he designed himself. If the grandeur of the tomb does not match his marvellous creations, its location however could not be more appropriate, right in the shadow of his greatest achievement in the capital of the Ottoman Empire: Süleymaniye Camii. The tomb is placed in the centre of a small triangular plot of land, with an octagonal charitable fountain at its corner to keep his memory alive. The structure was completed shortly before his death in 1588 AD.

    Mimar Sinan's tomb & fountain - January 2010
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    Tomb of Mimar Sinan

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 2, 2010

    If you turn right when, walking out of the main courtyard entrance of the Suleiman Mosque, and then down the narrow street you'll come to a junction where two roads meet. At the point where these roads meet is a small tomb with a cupola at the end. This is the tomb of Mimar Sinan (1490-1588) who was the chief Ottoman architect and civil engineer for sultans Suleiman I, Selim II, and Murad III. He was, during a period of fifty years, responsible for the construction or the supervision of every major building in the Ottoman Empire. More than three hundred structures are credited to his name which include 94 large mosques, 57 colleges, 52 smaller mosques, 48 bath-houses, 35 palaces, 22 mausoleums, 17 public kitchens, 8 bridges and 6 aqueducts.

    His masterpiece is the Selimiye Mosque in Edirne (see my Edirne page), although his most famous work is the Suleiman Mosque in Istanbul. Other works in Istanbul include the Sehzade Mehmet Mosque, Rustem Pasha Mosque and Sokollu Mehmet Pasha Mosque.

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    Roxelana Tomb

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 2, 2010

    In a break with Ottoman tradition, Suleiman married a harem girl, Roxelana, who became Hurrem Sultan; her intrigues as queen in the court and power over the Sultan made her quite renowned. Her tomb lies close to that of her husbands, behind the Suleiman Mosque.

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    Suleiman Tomb

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 2, 2010

    In the garden behind the Suleiman Mosque, there are two mausoleums which contain the tombs of sultan Suleiman I (1494-1566), his wife Roxelana, his daughter Mihrimah, his mother Dilashub Saliha and his sister Asiye. He was the tenth and longest-reigning Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, from 1520 to his death in 1566 and is known in the West as Suleiman the Magnificent due to his conquering prowess where he took the Ottoman Empire to its peak. The sultans Suleiman II, Ahmed II and Safiye (died in 1777), the daughter of Mustafa II, are also buried here.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Second largest mosque in Istanbul

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 2, 2010

    This huge mosque is the second largest mosque in Istanbul (after the Blue Mosque) and sits on a hill overlooking the Golden Horn. It was built on the order of Sultan Suleiman I (Suleiman the Magnificent) and was constructed by the great Ottoman architect Mimar Sinan. The construction work began in 1550 and the mosque was finished in 1557.

    As with other imperial mosques in Istanbul, the mosque itself is preceded by a monumental courtyard on its west side. At the four corners of the courtyard are the four minarets, a number only allowable to mosques endowed by a sultan (princes and princesses could construct two minarets; others only one). The minarets have a total of 10 galleries (serifes), which by tradition indicates that Suleiman I was the 10th Ottoman sultan.

    The main dome is 53 meters high and has a diameter of 26.5 meters. At the time it was built, the dome was the highest in the Ottoman Empire. Unfortunately the mosque was being renovated when I visited in late December 2009 so it wasn't possible to go inside. In the garden behind the main mosque there are two mausoleums which contain the tombs of sultan Suleiman I, his wife Roxelana, his daughter Mihrimah, his mother Dilashub Saliha and his sister Asiye (see next two tips). The mosque is surrounded by schools, a hospital, a kitchen, a caravanserai plus the tomb of its architect, Mimar Sinan, is also close by.

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  • TheLongTone's Profile Photo

    Mimar Sinan, Architect of the Felicitous Abode

    by TheLongTone Updated Jan 29, 2010

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    Can a dead person be a thing to do? In Sinan's case, most certainly.

    Any visitor to Istanbul is probably going to hear Sinan’s name. Any prolonged mosque-visiting will begin to give the impression that every other building had his hand involved in it, and indeed this is almost the case: his influence is all-pervasive. Ironically of the four great mosques of the city the two tourists are most likely to encounter are not his, although the Sultan Ahmet (blue) mosque is by a pupil.

    Sinan had an extraordinary life: long, varied and extraordinarily productive and innovative.
    Born in the ancient crossroad city of Kayseri in central Anatolia (1494-9?), the son of an Orthodox Christian, he was taken by levy for Janissary training. His rise was speedy. Trained as a cavalry officer with additional schooling in mathematics and carpentry, he was recruited into the Royal Guard and soon gained renown as a builder of bridges, while gaining additional insights into structural matters by observing the destructive effects of artillery. And eventually rising to sergeant at arms of the imperial bodyguard: high office. So far, so good. Until his forties he was certainly highly successful but his name would be no more known today than many other court functionaries of the period. His work as the pre-eminent architect of the Ottoman style, creating the mosques and associated complexes that have made his name so inescapable, only starts in 1536 and truly took off in 1539 when, aged at least forty, he was appointed Architect for Istanbul, responsible for the design and construction of public works, such as roads, waterworks and bridges. He held this office for nearly fifty years, until his death in 1488 . Through the years he transformed it into an vast government department, not only building but, crucially, training successors.

    Throughout this huge body of work there is constant experimentation and innovation, most particularly in the use of domes, and an evident mastery of the use of space. Not to mention exquisite decoration and detailing.

    There are over 200 surviving buildings attribute to Sinan. Where to begin?
    I've only been to Istanbul
    So of course the Sulemaniye complex, the Rustum Pasha mosque and the Sokullu Mehmet Pasha mosqua and medrese. Cross into Asia and right opposite the ferry dock there's another of his works: like the Mehmet Pasha, an example of Sinan's mastery of setting a complex into a sloping site.

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