Sultan Ahmed Area, Istanbul

40 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Sultanahmet Park, Istanbul, TR
    Sultanahmet Park, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Sultanahmet Park, Istanbul, TR
    Sultanahmet Park, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Sultanahmet Park, Istanbul, TR
    Sultanahmet Park, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Sultanahmet Park, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Updated May 20, 2013
    Sultanahmet Park, Istanbul, TR
    4 more images

    Sultanahmet Park is located just in the middle area of the most famous historic places of Old City in Istanbul ...

    On one side is the Sultan Ahmet Mosque, on the other side the Hagia Sophia, and just minutes walk away the Topkapı Palace. Its a great park with fountains, flowers, tulips and perfect green grass nature, which is crowded all the times by locals and by tourists. Even in winter time the crowd and queues of the Museums are still to be seen ...

    As you get tired with the museum visits, just have a seat and relax and enjoy the environment of the Sultanahmet Park.

    Here you can watch my HD Video of "Sultanahmet Park" .. :

    Video

    There are several cafes and restaurants around the park for your meals or just to sip a cold drink or a Turkish Tea ....

    Here you can see more photos of this beautiful area on "My Travelogue" .... :

    Colors of Sultanahmet Area

    Enjoy .... :)

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    Sultan Ahmed Mosque

    by HORSCHECK Updated Apr 6, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sultan Ahmed Mosque
    2 more images

    The construction of the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii) was commissioned by Sultan Ahmed I at the beginning of the 17th century. It is also known under the name Blue Mosque, due to the blue tiles in the interior.

    With 6 minarets and a capacity of approximately 10.000 people it is one of the biggest mosques in Istanbul.

    Directions:
    The Sultan Ahmed Mosque overlooks the southern side of the Sultan Ahmed Square in the touristy Sultanahmet district.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Trains
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Hipodrom and Museum of Islamic Arts

    by mindcrime Updated May 11, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Obelisk of Theodosius
    2 more images

    Sultanahmet is the historical part of Istanbul so we had the opportunity to see many landmarks of the city like Hagia Sofia, Blue Mosque, Palace Cistern, The Hipodrome Square, The Turkish And Islamic Arts Museum, the Topkapi palace etc.

    Early in the morning the first site we visited at Sultanahmet was the Hipodrome. Although today it is just a square (Sultanahmet Meydani) it used to be a big race circus but you have to imagine about it because there are not many fragments survived from that era. It was first built when the city was called Byzantium although it became popular and much bigger (holiding 100,000 people!) during Constantine the Great days when the city was called Constantinople.

    We visited the Serpent Column that was built to celebrate the victory of the Greeks against Persians in Persian Wars. Actually, it was called the Tripod of Plataea and was originally in the Temple of Apollo at Delphi in Greece. It was an impressive bronze column with a 8metre high serpent heads at the top that got stolen during the 4th crusade. Not much to see today except the base.

    Then we visited the Walled Obelisk which was 32metres high and was originally decorated with gilded bronze plaques but again the crusaders needed some extra income so they stolen them.

    Probably the most impressive monument on the area is the Obelisk of Theodosius(pic 1). Theodosius the Great brought from Egypt in 390AD. The obelisk was originally erected in Luxor back in 1490BC during Tuthmosis III kingdom (so I was impressed that I was in front of a piece of granite that was carved more than 3000 years before!!!). What see today is only the top of 3 different pieces that Thedosius brought to Constantinople.

    Finally, at the northern end of Hipodrome we saw the German Fountain (pic 2). It was built in Germany in neo-byzantine style and transferred piece by piece in Istanbul in 1900 to commemorate the 2nd anniversary of german emperor Wilhelm II to Istanbul in 1898.

    It was already 9.00am so we visited Museum of Islamic Arts(pic 3) which is located at the former palace of Ibrahim Pasha(1493-1536) that was the grand Vezir (and friend) of Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent. It houses a collection of 40,000 items covering a long period from the first period of Islam (7th century) till 20th century. We were impressed of some special carpets and some special carved woods. There are also glass, porcelain and stone items. Most of the art are religious themed of course but we also enjoyed some ethnographic exhibits like a full scale model of a nomad tent from 19th century. The museum is open Tuesday to Sunday 9.00-17.00 and the entrance fee is 10TL.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Tomb of Kara Mustafa Pasha

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    This tomb complex lies along Divan Yolu near the Beyazit tram stop. Kara Mustafa Pasha (1634/5-1683) was a military general who was a central character in the empire's last attempts at expansion into both Central and Eastern Europe.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Tomb of Koca Sinan Pasha

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    This tomb complex lies along Divan Yolu near the Beyazit tram stop. The complex has a medrese and a mausoleum. Koca Sinan Pasha was a Grand Vezir under Murat III and Mehmet II and the conqueror of Yemen. The whole complex was built in 1593 by Davut Aga, the successor of Sinan (the architect of, for instance, the Suleimaniye mosque and so much, much more) as Chief Architect.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Tomb of Sultan Abdul Hamid II and Sultan Mahmud II

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    This tomb and graveyard are along Divan Yolu shortly before the Cemberlitas tramway stop. Sultan Mahmud III died in 1838 and his tomb is in the then popular Empire style. With him are buried his son and grandson, as well as the sultans Abdul Aziz and Abdul Hamid II, and a large number of imperial consorts and princes.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Koprulu Mehmet Pasha Mosque

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This small mosque is also along Divan Yolu shortly before the Cemberlitas tramway stop. It was built between 1659-1660, founded by Mehmet Pasha and Fazil Ahmet Pasha, both from the Koprulu family, a family that is "considered to be the most distinguished family in the whole family of the Ottoman Empire".

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Firuz Aga Mosque

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    This small mosque is located near the Sultanahmet tram stop. Built in 1491 by Firuz Aga, who was Chief Treasurer in the reign of Sultan Beyazit II, it is one of the few examples in Istanbul of the “pre-classical” period, that is, of those built before 1500. It is the style that flourished mainly in Bursa when it was the capital of the Ottoman Empire.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Tomb of Sultan Ahmed I

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2010
    4 more images

    This tomb is to Sultan Ahmed I who was responsible for building the Blue Mosque and his tomb is located just to the north of the mosque. It was built in 1620 by Sultan Osman II who was Ahmed I's son and designed by Sedefkar Mehmed Aga. It's decorated with 17th century Iznik tiles. The tomb contains the tombs of Sultan Ahmed I and his wife’s, sons and daughters.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Sultan Ahmet Square

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    This attractive grassed square features a nice fountain where you can get some good photos of both the Hagia Sophia and Blue Mosque. It actually extends along the road to include the area that was formerly the Hippodrome where horse racing and chariot racing took place during Roman times.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Baths of Lady Hurrem

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 1, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This building is located outside the front of the Hagia Sophia, next to the fountain in Sultan Ahmet Square and used to be part of the mosque's compound as, traditionally, every mosque had a hamam (bath) in or around its complex. Designed by Sinan between 1556 and 1557, it was built by Suleiman in the name of his wife Hürrem Sultan, known in Europe as Roxelana. The hamam was one of 32 Sinan designed and is widely thought to be his best but it was being renovated when I visited in Dec 2009.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Kaiser Wilhelm Fountain

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated May 9, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kaiser Wilhelm Fountain
    4 more images

    The German Fountain is a gazebo styled fountain in the northern end of old hippodrome (Sultanahmet Square). It was constructed to commemorate the second anniversary of German Emperor Wilhelm II's visit to Istanbul in 1898.

    It was built in Germany, then transported piece by piece and assembled in its current site in 1900. The neo-Byzantine style fountain's octagonal dome has eight marble columns, and dome's interior is covered with golden mosaics.

    You can watch my 4 min 32 sec HQ Video Istanbul Hippodrome and German Fountain out of my Youtube channel with Laibach - Volk Turkiye.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Walled Obelisk

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 9, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Walled Obelisk
    4 more images

    In the 10th century the Emperor Constantine Porphyrogenitus built another obelisk at the other end of the Hippodrome. It was originally covered with gilded bronze plaques, but they were sacked by Latin troops in the Fourth Crusade. The stone core of this monument also survives, known as the Walled Obelisk.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Obelisk of Theodosius or Thutmose III

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 9, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Obelisk of Theodosius or Thutmose III
    4 more images

    Another emperor to adorn the Hippodrome was Theodosius the Great, who in 390 brought an obelisk from Egypt and erected it inside the racing track. Carved from pink granite, it was originally erected at the Temple of Karnak in Luxor during the reign of Tuthmosis III in about 1490 BC.

    Theodosius had the obelisk cut into three pieces and brought to Constantinople. Only the top section survives, and it stands today where Theodosius placed it, on a marble pedestal. The obelisk has survived nearly 3,500 years in astonishingly good condition.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Serpent Column

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written May 9, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Serpent Column
    4 more images

    Serpent Column is also known as the Delphi Tripod or the Plataean Tripod is an ancient column at the Hippodrome. It is an ancient Greek sacrificial tripod, originally located in Delphi (where I’ve been and saw the place where it had been located that time). Later it was relocated to Constantinople by Constantine I in 324.

    The serpent heads of the 8-meter high column remained until the end of the 17th century. One of the missing heads was later found and put on display at the Istanbul Archaeology Museums.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Istanbul

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

74 travelers online now

Comments

View all Istanbul hotels