Topkapi Palace, Istanbul

4.5 out of 5 stars 278 Reviews

Sultanahmet +90 212 512 0480

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Museum Shop at Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, TR
    Museum Shop at Topkapi Palace, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • Museum Shop at Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, TR
    Museum Shop at Topkapi Palace, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • Museum Shop at Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, TR
    Museum Shop at Topkapi Palace, Istanbul,...
    by TrendsetterME
  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Updated Jun 10, 2013

    5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Thats a real "must see" spot of Istanbul, whether you are a tourist or a local ...

    As being the primary residence of the Ottoman Sultans for approximately 400 years (1465 - 1856) of their 624-year reign, Topkapi Palace is an amazing combination of architecture and history.

    Construction began in year of 1459, ordered by "Sultan Mehmed II", the conqueror of Byzantine Constantinople. The palace complex consists of four main courtyards and many smaller buildings. At its peak, the palace was home to as many as 4,000 people and covered a large area with a long shoreline.

    There is a nice "Museum Shop" located at the Garden Courtyard of the Topkapi Palace, here you can read my Review of the "Museum Shop" ... :
    Museum Shop

    The complex was expanded over the centuries, with major renovations after the 1509 earthquake and the 1665 fire. The palace contained mosques, a hospital, bakeries, and a mint.

    Here you you can see more "Garden Courtyard" photos of this beautiful Palace on my "Travelogue" ... :
    Garden Courtyard of Topkapi Palace Travelogue

    The palace complex is located on the Seraglio Point (Sarayburnu), a promontory overlooking the Golden Horn and the Sea of Marmara, with a good view of the Bosphorus from many points of the palace. The site is hilly and one of the highest points close to the sea. During Greek and Byzantine times, the acropolis of the ancient Greek city of Byzantion stood here. There is an underground Byzantine cistern located in the Second Courtyard, which was used throughout Ottoman times, as well as remains of a small church, the so-called Palace Basilica on the acropolis, which have been excavated in modern times.

    Here you you can see more photos of this amazing Palace on my "Travelogue" ... :
    Topkapi Palace Travelogue

    The nearby Church of Hagia Irene, though located in the First Courtyard, is not considered a part of the old Byzantine acropolis.

    Here you can read my "Hagia Irene" review ... :
    Hagia Irene

    Enjoy your "Topkapi Palace" visit ... :)

    Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, TR Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, TR Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, TR Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, TR Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, TR
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    The Topkapi Palace

    by ValbyDK Written Jun 9, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Topkapi Palace was built in 1465 by Sultan Mehmed II (the conqueror of Constantinople), but changed many times since then, because during the almost 400 years of reign at the Topkapi Palace, each new sultan added a different section or building to the complex. The era as the primary residence of the Ottoman Sultan ended in 1856, where Sultan Abdül Mecid I moved some of the functions of the palace to the newly built Dolmabahçe Palace.

    The palace was transformed into a museum in 1924, and is today a great place to visit. The complex consists of four main courtyards, numerous buildings (f.ex. the Audience Chamber, the Conqueror's Pavillion, and the Library of Ahmed III), and many rooms and chambers... filled with collections of porcelain, robes, weapons, Islamic art and murals, and much more.

    Don't miss the Imperial Harem! You have to pay an extra fee to visit, but worth it. It was the home of the sultan's mother and the wives and concubines of the sultan – and IMO it is the most beautiful part of the Topkapi Palace.

    The Topkapi Palace - The Gate Of Salutation The Topkapi Palace The Topkapi Palace The Topkapi Palace
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Topkapi Palace Babusselam

    by traveloturc Updated Jun 8, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Babüsselâm (Gate of Salutations)
    This main gate to the Topkapi Palace leads to the Kubbealti where the audience gatherings took place and to the second courtyard where the Treasury was located. .To enter through this gate, everyone but the Sultan was obliged to dismount. Built in 1564 during the reign of Sultan Süleyman, the Magnificient, its main features are it's two octagonal towers.
    Not : Topkapi is the name of the palace and please dont confuse with a district with the same name.This district is very far to topkapi palace and has no connection with the palace .
    I am giving you very useful link to enjoy topkapi palace 360 degrees:
    http://www.360tr. com/topkapi/ index.htm
    enjoy it !!!

    entrance of topkapi Palace
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • vpas's Profile Photo

    Once upon a time!

    by vpas Written Dec 13, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hire a guide or get an audio guide and walk around the Topkapi palace. This is an interesting place to spend about 2 hours. There is besides the main palace, a harem, the treasury and art gallery. There are shops around and also a cafe with a beautiful view of the Bosphorous strait.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Imperial Treasury

    by mikey_e Written Dec 6, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    While the Audience Chamber holds interest for those in awe of power, the Imperial Treasury is, today, the big draw for tourists visiting Topkapi Palace. It is where the site’s jewels and precious items, both secular and religious, are held. Here too are items that were taken by the Ottomans after they lost control of Mecca and the Hejaz in the 20th century. While some of the artifacts are Ottoman gifts to the Grand Mosque, the Ottomans also took (read: stole) artifacts belonging to the Prophet Mohammad, including a shrine that once contained his cloak, and also some of his daily implements. The presence of these religious artifacts makes this one of the most popular spots in the entirety of the complex, and it is often so packed as to make it nearly impossible to move in the interior. As the visitor passes out from the room in which the holy objects are stored, she will be greeted by the sound of the recitation of the Qur’an, which is undertaken by four hodzas on a continuous basis, their sinuous voices intoning the exalted words of the holy scripture in perfect Arabic. Outside, in the fresh air and away from the crowds, visitors can admire the marble entrances and heavy wooden doors.

    Portico of the Treasury Close-up of Treasury entrance
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Imperial Divan (Exterior)

    by mikey_e Updated Dec 6, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Imperial Divan is, as its name suggests, the former site of the Imperial government. Until the Topkapi compound ceased to be the official residence of the Sultan and his entourage in the mid-19th century, this section was where the regent and his viziers met to decide the administration and policies of the Ottoman Empire. In the 1870s, the site of such meetings was moved definitively to the Sublime Porte, but until that time the Kübbealti was the main room in which the Sultan and his advisors would gather. Two more rooms are included in the divan, one for the secretaries of the former group, and one for the clerks and as a document storage area. The fact that the Imperial Divan was somewhere in which the Sultan spent a fair amount of time means that it is richly decorated with much of the famed Ottoman calligraphy still visible on the interior walls. The kubbealti (the section in which the Sultan and his viziers and advisers met) is decorated as well with ornate tiles. Outside, there is a wooden portico and the porch is decorated with green and white tiles, as well as gold inlays.

    The Imperial Divan Names for the Sultan Kubbealti
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Gate of Felicity

    by mikey_e Written Dec 6, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Gate of Felicity is, by far, the most magnificent of the gates for its intricate and elaborate carvings and decoration. It marks the entrance into the inner sanctum of the Palace, to the grounds in which the Sultan’s family and closest entourage resided. It was initially erected in the 15th century, but the current structure is the product of 18th century renovations under Sultan Mustafa III that introduced Rococo innovations to the design. It has slender marble columns that hold up its wide roof, and the grills and lattice work is what really captures the eye of the visitor. It is hard not to be drawn to the delicacy and intricacy of the carvings that are exhibited here, a testament to the exacting nature of the Sultan’s household with respect to the quality of workmanship in the inner part of the palace.

    Gate of Felicity Entrance to the Pavilion Side of the Pavilion Outer edge of the Gate Back of the Gate
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Audience Chamber

    by mikey_e Updated Dec 6, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Audience Chamber is the complimentary component of governance to the Imperial Divan. Here, the Sultan would receive his vizier and ambassadors and hear their reports, often making decisions on the success of his ministers on the spot. It was thus here that the Sultan passed judgment, in contrast to the consultative function of the Imperial Divan. The building itself is located in the inner (third) courtyard, implying that those who acceded to it had indeed reached an even higher level of responsibility than those who were admitted to the Imperial Divan. The building is decorated with sumptuous detail, especially the interior, which features a blue, diamond-studded ceiling, paintings of old Turkic legends and, of course, calligraphy of Quranic verses and the tughras. Outside of the Chamber there is a small fountain that was ingeniously installed in order to make it impossible for eavesdroppers to hear the Sultan’s conversations. A passageway leads out from this Chamber into the grounds of the Sultan’s harem.

    The main seating area A lamp in the Divan A tughra Fountain in the Chamber The reception area
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Tower of Justice

    by mikey_e Written Dec 6, 2012

    function than one might think. It was erected on its current site by Mehmet II in the late 15th century as a landmark to signal to the people the Sultan’s continuous stance against injustice. I was enlarged in the mid-16th century, and the upper portions of the tower were completely redone in the 1820s by Sultan Mahmud II, who had these built in European, rather than Ottoman styles. For this reason, the square tower is much more reminiscent of the dour steeples of Protestant churches in northern Europe or France, rather than the slender Ottoman minarets.

    The Tower of Justice
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Gate of Salutation

    by mikey_e Written Dec 6, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Gate of Salutation is the gate through which visitors with tickets for the harem and Imperial Divan must pass. It is most notable for the manner in which it resembles European-style fortifications, and indeed the towers and the majority of the gate are said to be of Byzantine, rather than Ottoman, design. This is the gate through which official visitors and dignitaries would pass, and both Byzantine and Ottoman tradition hold that only the regent is permitted to pass through it on horseback. The towers at the gate, which are octagonal, are most reminiscent of fairy tale castles and structures in European sites, and result in a bit of a discordant note with the interior structures of the Second Courtyard, which are in much more traditional Ottoman architecture.

    Salutation Gate Sherbet seller at the Gate Another view of the Gate
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Imperial Gate

    by mikey_e Written Dec 5, 2012

    The Imperial Gate is the primary entrance to the Topkapi Palace complex, and it is likely the gate you will go through to access the grounds if you are coming from Hagia Sophia. It is hard to miss, as it features a massive grey façade that is made from marble and was added to the original gate in the 1800s. It is decorated with Ottoman-style calligraphy in gold that dates from the 19th century and that contains verses from the Qur’an and the monograms of the Sultans, known as tughras.

    The Imperial Gate Imperial Gate from afar Gardens by the gate
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Passé Palais

    by mikey_e Written Dec 5, 2012

    Topkapi Palace, together with the Blue Mosque and Hagia Sophia, completes the triad of Istanbul’s monumental Ottoman/Byzantine structures. Today, the Palace, like Hagia Sophia, is a museum that houses the relics of the country’s Ottoman splendor. The Palace has benefitted additionally from its starring role in the movie Topkapi, and from being inscribed in the rolls of UNESCO World Heritage sites. It was first builtin the 1450s, following the capture of the city of Constantinople by the Ottomans, and thus is entirely an Ottoman site, despite having been constructed on the site of the old Byzantine acropolis. As it stands on the top of a hill on Seraglio Point, the Palace provides magnificent views of parts of the city as well as the southern edge of the Bosphorus and the Marmara. Topkapi Palace was initially the residence of the Sultan and the royal family, and thus it is exemplary of the royal architectural styles that dominated in the 15th and 16th centuries. In the 17th and 18th centuries, however, the Palace was overshadowed as the preferred residence of the royals by newer palaces on the Bosphorus, and finally in the 19th century the Sultan Abdül Mecid I decided to move his residence officially to Dolmabahçe. In 1924, the complex was converted to a museum by the Republic.

    The grounds Tourists at Topkapi Manicured lawns View from the museum Interior grounds
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • rafighi's Profile Photo

    A Must-See Attraction in Istanubul

    by rafighi Written Jul 23, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Great architecture who shows Turkey's rich history.
    But I doubt the authenticity of the objects such as the beard of the Prophet Mohammad,...., however the leader told they have experimented their authenticity by carbon test.
    There are five rooms which are connected to each other and there are plenty of objects which are generally the gifts given to Ottoman kings by other countries.

    Opening hours:
    Open Wednesday - Monday from 9am- 7pm (Ticket sales end at 6pm). Topkapi Palace is closed on Tuesdays.

    Tickets:
    Palace: 20 TL
    Harem: By guided tour only. Extra tickets for the Harem must be purchased inside the palace by the Harem entrance for 15 TL per person.

    Guides: Available at an extra fee –approximately 10TL per person for a large group.

    Audio Guides: 5TL. Available in English, German, French, Italian and Spanish.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Topkapi palace

    by Raimix Updated Feb 6, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The huge palace was built just after conquering of Constantinople in 1453. It was the main residence of Ottoman sultans till 19th century, when they moved to other palaces.

    Palace is a full range of different type of buildings from sultans’ kitchens, library to audience chamber and famous harem. Some places are still quite oriental, and some are already made in Western fashion (let’s say, rococo details in interior).

    I haven’t been to harem, as I though all in all visiting full palace area is too overpriced. Anyway, visiting main parts of it is quite worthy – to have idea how sultans lived.

    The price of ticket for an adult was 20 liras.

    Was this review helpful?

  • mtncorg's Profile Photo

    DIVAN/KUBBE ALTI

    by mtncorg Updated Nov 20, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    On the west side of the Second Court/Divan Meydani is the Divan where the Imperial Council met four times a week. The viziers used to recline on the cushioned benches as they discussed matters of the empire. Next door, is the old former Inner Treasury/Ish Hazine which was the pay office for the Janissary soldiers stationed here at the palace. Today, the Treasury houses a weapons exhibit covering weapons from the 7th to 20th centuries.

    Tower of Justice rises above the Divan Inside the domes of the Divan Entrances into the Divan Porches outside the Divan
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Istanbul

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

34 travelers online now

Comments

View all Istanbul hotels