Istanbul Transportation

  • Sutluce Port, Istanbul, TR
    Sutluce Port, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Sirkeci Terminal, Istanbul, TR
    Sirkeci Terminal, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Sirkeci Terminal, Istanbul, TR
    Sirkeci Terminal, Istanbul, TR
    by TrendsetterME

Most Recent Transportation in Istanbul

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    Cable Car (Teleferik), Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Updated Apr 30, 2013

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    Cable Car (Teleferik), Istanbul, TR
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    This teleferik runs across the valley behind Dolmabahce Palace, from near the Istanbul Hilton to near the Hilton ParkSA Istanbul over the Democracy Park of Macka.

    If you're staying on the east side of the valley in the Hilton ParkSA Istanbul, Swissôtel The Bosphorus, Park Hyatt Istnbul, or another hotel in the Macka or Tesvikiye districts, it's useful to go across the valley to Taksim Square and Beyoglu.

    If you're staying at the Istanbul Hilton, the Swissôtel or Park Hyatt, the Grand Hyatt, the Ceylan InterContinental, the Divan Oteli, or any of the nice 4-star hotels near Taksim Square, you might want to cruise across the valley for fun.

    Operates 09:00am to 18:00pm every 15mins to and back.
    Costs about 1.- USD / one way.

    U can buy a token with TL coins or use your Istanbulkart if you have one ... :)

    Beautiful view of Bosphorus as riding from one station to another ...

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    Tram and Metro Lines, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Updated Apr 22, 2013

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    Tram and Metro Lines, Istanbul, TR
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    Public transportation in the city of Istanbul officially started August 30, 1869, with the agreement relating to "The Tramway in Dersaadet and Its Facilities". The operation of the first horse drawn tram started in 4 lines in 1871. In the same year, the construction of the Tünel, a short funicular between Pera and Galata, started. The funicular opened to service on December 5, 1874, the second oldest subway in the world after the London underground; today it is still in service. Shift to electricity tram took place on February 2, 1914 and starting from June 8, 1928, tram operation was effective on the Anatolian side.

    The tram, Tünel, bus and electricity establishments, which had been operated by various foreign companies, were nationalized in 1939 and gained their current status under the name of the Directorate General of IETT Establishments. In 1945, Yedikule and Kurbağalıdere gas plants and the Istanbul and Anadolu gas distribution systems fed by these plants were taken over. As a result of the amendment in the TEK (Turkish Establishment of Electricity) law No: 2705, dated September 9, 1982, all electricity services, along with their rights and responsibilities, were granted to TEKB. In June 1993, in compliance with the orders of the Metropolitan Municipality, town gas production and distribution activities were terminated. Today İETT provides only public transportation with buses, BRT (Metrobüs) and Tunnel Operations and also responsible for management and inspection of Private Bus Transit Services.

    For all public transport in Istanbul, following are the websites for all details of schedules, routes, arrival departure times etc :

    http://www.istanbul-ulasim.com.tr/default.asp
    http://www.iett.gov.tr/
    http://www.istanbul.net.tr/istanbul_raylisistemler.asp

    And now, the system, which will be combining the both sides of Istanbul, European and the Asian sides, is on he go to be finished in 2014, sothat u can land on the European side at the Atatürk International Airport and reach the Asian side w the metro/subway system in ca. 45 mins without getting off the tram for a very budgeted fee ... :)

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    Attaturk Airport and Turkish Airways

    by uglyscot Updated Apr 21, 2013

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    waiting for next flight, Istanbul

    I have travelled to Turkey , passing through the airport heading for London on several occasions.
    Turkish airways is reportedly the best European airline and for service and reliability .
    The aircraft I have been on have been new and clean.I have no serious complaints, except that I always have a metal box at my feet that means I cannot put my handbag beneath the seat in front, as we are directed to do. It also gives little room for the footrest. The toilets are very small but quite well looked after.
    The meals were tasty, though I did react unpleasantly to the spinach we had for part of our breakfast; however the cheesy pastry was excellent.
    The schedule suited me quite well as I was able to leave Khartoum at 3.20 and arrive in Istanbul with two hour transit before flying on to London to arrive at 10.25 [all local times]. But be warned, plans may be changed because of the weather. We had to cancel our first booking on 9 January 2012 because a snowstorm hit Istanbul. Passengers whose destination was Istanbul had no problem, but the airline could not guarantee any connections for those onward-going. We opted to try again the following day, which we did. However, we were warned of a possible two hour delay in Istanbul because there was fog at Heathrow.Luckily there were places to find food and drink, and plenty of seating at the boarding gate. My daughter had gone to find coffee and did not hear any announcement, about half an hour later, that the gate was now open. Nor did I ,unless it was in Turkish, which was not good enough as the flight was going to London and the majority of passengers looked as if they were British. As it was, we sat on the runway for over an hour before take off. Arrived approximately 2 hours late.
    .
    Prices are reasonable, but vary from day to day. The baggage allowance on economy is 30 kg, though how strict they are might depend on the clerk checking you in. April 2013 , they were very strict so we had to return some of our luggage. They were also in a rush to go elsewhere and hand us over to another check-in clerk so that when we saw our boarding passes we found grand-daughter was seated in another part of the plane- for both legs. The leg to Istanbul we managed to sort out at a more cooperative check in desk, but then had to go through the same rigmarole in Istanbul.

    Because of the price and convenient schedule for me, I would still recommend it.

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    Zeytinburnu Interchange Tram Station, Istanbul, TR

    by TrendsetterME Written Apr 18, 2013

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    Zeytinburnu Interchange Tram Station, Istanbul, TR
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    The Istanbul LRT (Light Metro) which consists of the M1 and T4 lines, is a light metro system in Istanbul, spanning a total length of 32 km (20 miles) with 10.4 km (6 mi) of it underground.

    There are 40 stations, including 12 underground and 3 viaduct stations. Line M1 is in fact a full metro line and no light metro, because it is totally segregated from other traffic without level crossings, while line T4 has some level crossings.

    Stations :

    Aksaray station
    Havalimanı (Ataturk International Airport).
    Dunya Ticaret Merkezi: EXPO and World Trade Center
    Yenibosna
    Atakoy - Sirinevler
    Bahcelievler
    Bakırkoy - İncirli
    "Zeytinburnu: This station is an interchange station. Passengers may change the vehicle to T1 (to the Grand Bazaar, Blue Mosque, Eminonu and Kabatas) and T2 (to Bagcılar)."
    "Merter: A viaduct station on D-100 transit road. Here passengers may interchange to the Metrobus line (Sogutlücesme-Avcılar)."
    Davutpasa
    Terazidere
    "Esenler Bus Terminal/Esenler: Intercity Bus Station. Passengers may switch to another destination from Esenler by bus."
    Kartaltepe - Kocatepe - Forum İstanbul
    Sagmalcılar
    Bayrampasa - Maltepe
    Topkapı - Ulubatlı
    Emniyet - Fatih: Istanbul Central Police Department
    Aksaray: Passengers may interchange to T1 again here as well.

    Either tokens might be bought or u can use Istanbulkart if u own one ...

    One way cost of the ride is about 1.- USD.

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    Explore Istanbul by local ferry

    by HORSCHECK Written Apr 6, 2013

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    Istanbul ferry: Besiktas I
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    One of the nicest and cheapest ways to explore Istanbul is by local ferry. Although the variety of ships and companies might look a bit confusing, it is still a very simple way to see the city.

    The most frequented ferry terminals on the European side of Istanbul are near Eminönü and Karaköy on both sides of the Galata Bridge. From here the ferries set sail for the Asian side of the city, where Üsküdar and Kadiköy are the main stops.

    My recommendation for an interesting ferry stop is Haydarpasa on the Asian side. Here a massive early 20th century train station can be found.

    Most boats on the inner city lines seem to be traditional passenger ferries, which are operated by the Sehir Hatlari company. On the route from Kadiköy to Kabatas I once was lucky enough to find myself on a modern seabus of the IDO (Istanbul Deniz Otobüsleri) company.

    In December 2012 the cash fare for Istanbul’s inner city ferry routes was 3 TYR. For this money a token (Jeton) had to be bought from the automatic machines to open the turnstiles to the ferry piers.

    Operating times of the ferries seem to start in the early morning hours and end at 23:00 h at the latest.

    Website: http://www.sehirhatlari.com.tr/
    Webite: http://www.ido.com.tr/

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    To Istanbul Atatürk Airport by plane

    by HORSCHECK Updated Apr 6, 2013

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    Istanbul Atat��rk Airport: Turkish Airlines
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    Istanbul has two international airports: Atatürk Airport on the European side and Sabiha Gökcen Airport on the Asian side of the city.

    I arrived and departed from Istanbul's Atatürk Airport with flights from/to Duesseldorf (Germany) operated by Turkish Airlines.

    Istanbul's Atatürk airport is located about 24 km west of the city centre. On arrival I was collected by a shuttle of the hotel. On return I took the M1 Light Rail Service to get to the airport. Please read my "To Istanbul's Atatürk Airport by Metro M1" tip for more information.

    Atatürk Airport is one of Europe's busiests airports, so I was quite surprised about the inefficient way passengers were handled.

    There were very long queues at the entrance of the terminal building where an additional safety control had to be passed, as well as at the check-in and especially at the passport and safety control to the gates. So I can only recommend to plan plenty of time when departing from the airport.

    Website: http://www.ataturkairport.com/

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    To Istanbul Atatürk airport by Light Rail M1

    by HORSCHECK Written Apr 6, 2013

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    Light Rail M1
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    Istanbul's Atatürk airport can conveniently be reached by the Light Rail line M1 (Hafif Metro). The line exists since September 1989 and nowadays connects the airport (Havalimani) with Aksaray in Istanbul's Fatih district on the European side of the city.

    The Light Rail M1 has two interchange stations with the tramway line T1, which serves a route to the touristic districts on both sides of the Golden Horn (e.g. Sultanahmet and Sirkeci).

    To get access to the Light Rail M1 a token (Jeton) has to be bought. In December 2012 it cost 3 TYR at automatic machines at the stations.

    Website: http://www.istanbul-ulasim.com.tr/

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    Explore Istanbul by tram or bus

    by HORSCHECK Updated Apr 6, 2013

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    Istanbul tram
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    I must admit that I found the ticketing system of Istanbul’s trams and buses quite confusing, although public transportation was generally easy to use.

    For me it looked like that there are different companies operating the buses, trams and metro. Also, what I would call a tram network sometimes seems to be referred to as metro or light rail.

    Most of the trams can be used with a jeton (token), which gives you access to the tram platform via a turnstile. The token can be bought from automatic machines for 3 TYR (December 2012) at the tram stops.

    For the local buses I used an electonic ticket with a fixed number of journeys, e.g. one journey for 4 TYR, 2 journeys for 7 TYR and 3 journeys for 10 TYR. Sometimes this ticket could even be used for the trams.

    Tickets can’t be bought from the driver. So if you plan to use public transportation extensively, it probably makes sense to buy a few journeys as electronic ticket from a kiosk. Also some small change might be helpful to spontaneously buy tokens (jetons) from automatic machines.

    Website: http://www.istanbul-ulasim.com.tr/
    Website: http://www.iett.gov.tr/

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    Explore Istanbul by Tünel

    by HORSCHECK Written Apr 6, 2013

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    T��nel  underground funicular
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    The Tünel (Tunnel) is a sort of underground funicular, which links the northern end of the Galata Bridge (Karaköy) with the southern end of the busy Istiklal Caddesi shopping street in Beyoglu.

    The almost 600 m long route was inaugurated in 1875. It is said to be the second-oldest underground railway system (after London Underground).

    Probably unlike most others, I used the Tünel downwards, although the more helpful direction is updwards.

    If I got it right, then both tokens (jetons) and electronic tickets can be used for the Tünel. For more info about these tickets please read my “Explore Istanbul by tram or bus” tip.

    Website: http://www.iett.gov.tr/

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    Explore Istanbul by Kabatas-Taksim Füniküler F1

    by HORSCHECK Written Apr 6, 2013

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    Kabatas-Taksim F��nik��ler F1
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    One of the latest additions to Istanbul’s public transport network is the Kabatas to Taksim Füniküler F1. The funicular service started on the 30. June 2006.

    The bottom station can be found at Kabatas at the Bophorus. Kabatas is also the stating point for trams towards Sirkeci and Bosphorus ferries to the Asian side of the city. The top station is located at the busy Taksim Square in the Beyoglu district.

    The fare of 3 TYR (December 2012) can be paid by token (jeton) or electronic ticket.

    Website: http://www.istanbul-ulasim.com.tr/

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    Wi-fi at Sabiha Gökçen Airport

    by SWFC_Fan Written Mar 13, 2013

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    Sabiha G��k��en Airport, Istanbul

    During our visit to Istanbul in February 2013 we found ourselves with a few hours to kill at Sabiha Gökçen Airport.

    Unfortunately, Sabiha Gökçen is not one of those airports that offers free wi-fi. Or, at least, it didn't where we were sitting in the departure lounge.

    Instead, an unsecured network offered by DorukNet was offered for a fee. The connection fee could be paid by credit/debit card and was not too extortionately priced:

    8 TL (ca. £3) for 2 hours or 16 TL (ca. £6) for unlimited access.

    I chose not to use the wi-fi so I cannot comment on its speed or reliability.

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    Nostaljik Tramvay

    by SWFC_Fan Written Mar 1, 2013

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    Nostaljik Tramvay on Istiklal Caddesi, Istanbul
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    The Nostaljik Tramvay is a historic tram that trundles along the busy shop and restaurant-lined Istiklal Caddesi between Tünel Square and Taksim Square.

    It is a journey that is more about history and nostalgia than convenience or speed; it rattles along the street barely faster than walking pace.

    The tram's interior is wood panels and cushioned seats, and there is only enough seating for 10 or so passengers inside the small and cramped carriage.

    The Tünel end of the line is just a few metres from the Tünel underground railway that connects Tünel Square with Galata Bridge and the Karaköy area of the city.

    We rode on the Nostaljik Tramvay during our visit to Istanbul in February 2013. We had a fair bit of difficulty getting tickets for the tram, despite the fact that there were only a few other passengers on board. The problem was that no cash is accepted on board the tram and the ticket machines where we should have purchased our tickets were out of order. We attempted to purchase tickets from the manned booth at the upper station of the Tünel railway, with the help of the tram conductor, but were told by the man in the booth that he couldn't sell tickets to us.

    It looked like we might miss out on a ride, but then a local passenger on board the tram suggested that we could scan ourselves onto the tram using his travel pass and reimburse him for the cost. By doing it this way, the ride only cost us 1.95 TL (£0.80) each and we gave the friendly gentleman 3.90 TL to cover his cost. In fact, we gave him a 5 TL note and were happy for him to keep the change, but he insisted on only charging us the 3.90 TL that it had cost him.

    The tram ride itself was nothing special, but the generous help we received from our fellow passenger is something we won't forget in a hurry.

    Nostaljik Tramvay – a slow ride from Tünel Square to Taksim Square on a characteristic tram!

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    Tünel underground railway

    by SWFC_Fan Written Mar 1, 2013

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    T��nel underground railway, Istanbul
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    The Tünel, dating back to the 1870s, is the world's second oldest underground railway system (after London Underground).

    It is only a very short railway though (a little under 600 metres in length) and has only two stops; a lower station in Karaköy and an upper station in Beyoğlu. The journey between the two stations takes less than 2 minutes.

    The Karaköy station is just a couple of minutes walk from the end of Galata Bridge. The Beyoğlu station is located on Tünel Square and is just a few metres from the stop for the "Nostaljik Tramvay" which trundles along the busy shopping and dining street of Istiklal Caddesi to Taksim Square.

    The train on the Tünel is clean and modern and consists of one carriage, similar to that of a Metro train. There was ample seating on the train on the quiet Sunday morning that we travelled on the Tünel in February 2013, and plenty of room for standing too.

    Tickets for the Tünel can be purchased from manned booths at the two stations. At the time of our visit, prices were as follows:

    1 journey = 4 TL (£1.60)
    2 journeys = 7 TL (£2.80)
    5 journeys = 15 TL (£6.00)
    10 journeys = 28 TL (£11.20)

    We purchased a 2 journey ticket between us and scanned it at the turnstile to access the train platform.

    The Tünel underground railway is a good value means of travelling up the steep hill from Karaköy to Tünel Square, Istiklal Caddesi and Taksim Square.

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    E10 bus to/from Sabiha Gokcen airport

    by SWFC_Fan Written Mar 1, 2013

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    Kadik��y bus station, Istanbul
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    In February 2013, en route to Tbilisi, we found ourselves with an 18 hour flight connection at Istanbul's Sabiha Gökçen airport.

    We landed in Istanbul at 5:00am on a Sunday and departed at 11:00pm that evening, giving us the opportunity for a full day of sightseeing.

    After a bit of research, we decided that our best option was to catch a bus from Sabiha Gökçen airport to Kadıköy ferry terminal and then a ferry across to Eminönü and the heart of the city.

    There were a few options for getting from the airport to Kadiköy, including coaches operated by Havatas and the local E10 Bus. Both of these buses drop passengers off at the bus terminal, just a couple of minutes walk from the ferry terminal.

    In the morning, we caught the 6:00am Havatas coach to Kadiköy. It was a comfortable, modern coach with plenty of leg room and an undercarriage for storing luggage. The ticket cost 8 TL (£3) and, in light Sunday morning traffic, the journey to Kadiköy took only 30 minutes.

    We fully intended to catch a Havatas coach back from Kadiköy to Sabiha Gökçen later that day.

    However, after getting off the ferry from Eminönü and wandering around Kadiköy for a while, we just missed the 5:15pm coach to the airport. We decided to head to a cafe for a glass of Turkish tea and some sticky baklava and return in time for the 5:45pm coach.

    We were back at the bus station in good time (just after 5:35pm), but found that the 5:45pm bus was already full and was therefore departing early. We would therefore have to wait for the next coach at 6:15pm.

    We didn't fancy standing at the bus stop for 40 minutes, and we didn't want to go too far and risk missing the 6:15pm coach as well, so when we noticed the E10 bus at an adjacent bus stop we decided to catch that instead. It left at 5:55pm.

    The E10 bus cost 7 TL (£2.80) – compared to 8 TL on the Havatas coach – and we purchased our tickets from the driver as we got on board.

    Unlike the Havatas coach, there was no undercarriage on the E10 bus for storing luggage. It was just an ordinary city bus...and a rather crowded one at that! While we had enjoyed comfortable spacious seats on the Havatas coach, we found ourselves crammed into a couple of small seats on the E10 and soon found ourselves hemmed in by passengers standing in the aisle.

    At this time in the evening, the traffic was far heavier than it had been when we arrived in the morning. We crawled out of Kadiköy and made our way onto the highway, following dozens of stops to allow more passengers to board. I hoped the journey would speed up once we were on the highway, but the combination of heavy traffic and the fact that the bus came off the highway and took a less direct route to the airport, meant that it was a long and uncomfortable journey. The journey that had taken us 30 minutes in the morning took us 70 minutes in the evening.

    Even allowing for the fact that heavier traffic was partly responsible for our longer journey, I would still recommend catching the Havatas coach rather than the E10 bus, especially if you have luggage with you. It is a more comfortable and direct journey...and only costs 1 TL (£0.40) more than the E10 bus.

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    Ferries between Kadıköy and Eminönü

    by SWFC_Fan Written Mar 1, 2013

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    Ferry between Kadik��y and Emin��n��
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    In February 2013, en route to Tbilisi, we found ourselves with an 18 hour flight connection at Istanbul's Sabiha Gökçen airport.

    We landed in Istanbul at 5:00am on a Sunday and departed at 11:00pm that evening, giving us the opportunity for a full day of sightseeing.

    We researched the various means of getting from the airport into the city centre, and settled upon the following option:

    Bus from Sabiha Gökçen airport to Kadıköy ferry terminal;
    Ferry from Kadıköy to Eminönü.

    This tip relates to the ferry journey from Kadiköy to Eminönü in the morning and the reverse trip later in the day.

    Kadıköy to Eminönü

    We arrived by bus at Kadıköy bus station (just a couple of minutes walk from the ferry terminal) at 6:30am on a Sunday morning.

    The first ferry departing for Eminönü that day was at 7:10am, so we went for breakfast at a nearby cafe and had a walk around the Kadıköy waterfront, before eventually catching the 7:50am ferry. There were only a handful of passengers on board our ferry. Ferries were running every 20 minutes from 7:10am until 8:00pm and then less frequently after that.

    To board the ferry you have to purchase a token (a small metal coin-like token) from machines at the ferry terminal. A token costs 3 TL (£1.20) and is used to access the turnstiles that lead to the ferry. The machines were straightforward enough to use, and had English translations displayed on them, but we had trouble getting them to accept banknotes. It took several attempts, and several different notes, before we eventually got the machine to accept one.

    The journey to Eminönü took around 20 minutes and we disembarked just a few metres from Galata Bridge and a short walk from the Spice Bazaar.

    Throughout the course of the journey, the ferry was followed by a large flock of seagulls. We stood outside on the deck and watched as locals fed bread to them.

    The ferry was an exciting way to arrive in the heart of Istanbul – far more interesting than taking a bus or a taxi!

    Eminönü to Kadıköy

    In contrast to the early morning ferry, the 4:40pm ferry back to Kadıköy was incredibly busy. We couldn't find a seat inside the boat's warm interior, so we made our way out onto the cold, wind-swept deck.

    The return journey was similar to our morning journey in many respects. We purchased our 3 TL tokens from a machine at Eminönü terminal (this time with coins after our problems trying to use banknotes in the machines earlier in the day) and we sat on the deck watching as hundreds of seagulls chased the ferry in search of food.

    Like our outbound ferry, the ferries from Eminönü to Kadıköy has been running every 20 minutes from 7:40am and would continue to run every 20 minutes until around 7:20pm, after which point they would become less frequent.

    One aspect of the return journey that did differ from our outbound journey is that we stopped briefly at Haydarpaşa Terminal on the way back to Kadıköy. This extended the journey time slightly from 20 minutes to around 25 minutes.

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Istanbul Transportation

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