Ephesus Off The Beaten Path

  • Ephesus - Goats’s paths
    Ephesus - Goats’s paths
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Ephesus - Goats’s paths
    Ephesus - Goats’s paths
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Ephesus - Goats’s paths
    Ephesus - Goats’s paths
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Ephesus

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Goats’s paths

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    I suspect that the Curetes street in Ephesus is one of the most beaten path in the world, haha! Hundreds of tourists crowd there all day long and it’s very difficult to take a photo without catching one or many strolling persons in front of a sight!

    But I could notice several off the beaten paths in Ephesus… Really these paths exist there! You won’t see any tourists and guides there. Are you intrigued? Yes, these are goat’s paths which you can see at my pictures. Only goats can walk upwards the hills around Ephesus and enjoy lonely walk above touristic crowds, haha!

    You can watch my 1 min 12 sec Video clip Ephesus's goats with Nalan – Cayir-Cayir Turkish pop music.

    Ephesus - Goats���s paths Ephesus - Goats���s paths Ephesus - Goats���s paths Ephesus - Goats���s paths

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  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    Isa Bey Camii

    by Paul2001 Written Feb 6, 2005

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    The Isa Bey Camii is an impressive mosque located just at the base of Ayasuluk Hill. The mosque dates from 1375. It has an interesting dome over top of the structure and a grand courtyard. There is a friendly guardian or mulla who will show you around the mosque. If your spending sometime on your own in Selcuk, it is worth visiting the mosque. It is closed at prayer times.

    The Isa Bey Camii The Isa Bey Camii from St. John's Basilica
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  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    The Byzantine Aqueduct

    by Paul2001 Written Apr 21, 2005

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    Crossing the west of the Selcuk is a 6th century Byzantine aqueduct. The aqueduct extends for a few blocks along Namik Kemil Caddesi. Today its columns are often used to support the walls of old buildings and for storks to nest for much of the summer. On top of the one of the columns pictured you can see a such a nest.

    The Byzantine Aqueduct
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  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    The Basilica of St. John

    by Paul2001 Written Aug 27, 2005

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    It is said that St. John lived here in the last years of life. The Basilica of St. John was built by Justinian the Great, the Byzantine Emperor, in the 5th century on the spot were they supposedly found the tomb of St. John. The church was said to be astonishing in its day but today it is a very large ruin. This is because of the centuries of earthquakes and pillaging. It was restored to some degree about one hundred years ago. If you want to visit a good Byzantine ruin after your visit to Ephesus, then by all means come here as the place was quite interesting. The ruins are located northeast of Selcuk on St. Jean Cad.
    The Basilica of St. John is open from 8am to 6pm daily and costs $2.00 for a visit.

    The Ruins of the Basilica of St. John
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  • Coins of Ephesus

    by buket Written Jun 11, 2003

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    Coins of Ephesus most frequently depicted a bee on the obverse. The earliest coins of Ephess had geometric punch mark reverses. Later coins of Ephesus most frequently depicted a stag on the reverse. Ephesus was a producer of honey and the location of a famous temple of Artemis. The bee advertised their most famous product and both the bee and stag symbolized worship of Artemis.
    You can see them in Ephesus Museum, Selcuk

    Coins of Ephesus
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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    watch out for great sculptures

    by globetrott Updated Apr 28, 2005

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    You may see small fragments of fassades or statues, lying around at many places and so it is worth to explore also the side-streets whenever possible.
    The person standing next to this great sculpture may show you the big size of this rock and you may imagine how difficult it was - especially with just the old technical means - to get a stone of this size on the right place of a fassade.
    Sorry for the bad quality of the photo - it is a scanning of my Super-8-film, that is actually a slide with a size of just 4mmx8mm

    Ephesus / Efes
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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    another mainstreet

    by globetrott Updated Apr 28, 2005

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    This is another mainstreet towards the old port of Ephesus.
    Simply compare the width of these streets with the ones on my pomeji-page.
    In Pompeji only on the big streets 2 carriages might have passed by each other, while here certainly 4-5 carriages could all go next to each other without problem.
    On the sides of the street you still may see some columns of the houses and temples.
    Sorry for the bad quality of the photo - it is a scanning of my Super-8-film, that is actually a slide with a size of just 4mmx8mm

    Ephesus / Efes
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  • Latrina - Public Toilets

    by buket Written Apr 24, 2003

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    This square-shaped public toilet had a pool in the center with seats arranged along the sides. A water channel was in front of the seats and the floor was covered in mosaic. The seats were covered but the pool was open. At each corner of the pool was a column supporting the roof.

    Latrina
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    Writings on the wall

    by SirRichard Written Dec 12, 2002

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    There are some inscriptions on the front of the building. If you are curious, they say that "the library was erected in 110 AD by the Consul Gaius (Tiberius) Julius Aquila as a mausoleum for his father Gaius (Tiberius) Julius Celsus Polemaenus Aquila (92-114 AD). A sum of 25,000 denarii was bequeathed for the purchase of books and the upkeep of the building."

    Gate of the Library from inside

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  • Holy graffiti

    by aaron60 Updated Aug 5, 2005

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    Not truly off the beaten path...this one actually IS the beaten path, haha...but interesting.

    While doing some research on the Net before my trip, I found a web site with a picture of "Christian graffiti". Apparently early Christians carved these markings into the paving stones of the Arcadian Way.

    These carvings were made by totally ordinary people, with no intention of making them last thousands of years. But here they are. Quite impressive considering they are stepped upon by thousands of feet daily. They're not far from where the Arcadian Way meets the Marble Street in front of the amphitheatre.

    For an explanation of the meaning of the graffiti at lower left, go to
    http://www.classics.ox.ac.uk/resources/www/pictures/turkey/symbol.html.

    Arcadian Way
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  • guell's Profile Photo

    Go Where Others Don't

    by guell Written Aug 1, 2004

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    When I visit a place, I always make an effort to go where others don't, and sometimes I'm pleasantly surprised with what I find. In this case, the view of the theatre from inside gave me a completely perspective of the place.

    Ephesus Theatre
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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    more great fassades

    by globetrott Updated Apr 28, 2005

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    Here is another great detail of a fassade, looking even good , although taken out of one of my old super-8 movies.Sorry for the bad quality of the photo - it is a scanning of my Super-8-film, that is actually like a slide with a size of just 4mmx8mm

    I may simply admire these great artists, having been able to produce such works of art with old techniques

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Grotto of the Seven Sleepers

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

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    Located on the northern slopes of Mount Pion along the road that goes around the hill is the Grotto of the Seven Sleepers which was discovered by both Christians and Muslims. According to Christian legend, seven young men were walled in during the reign of Decius (250 AD) but were seen alive in the streets of Ephesus during the reign of Theodosius II some years after the Council of Ephesus (431 AD). In the Koran, it is claimed that the sleepers slept 309 years in their tombs. A church was built above this Grotto by the Christians. During excavations in the area, the church and several tombs have been excavated. Some inscriptions about the Seven Sleepers can be found on the walls of the church.

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  • iandsmith's Profile Photo

    The terrace houses

    by iandsmith Written Apr 12, 2015

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    When I first visited these, the area wasn't open to the public. Now, 17 years on, they're open for business....the Austrians that is, for that is where the funding is coming from.
    Now, you have to know that this area is extra, not only as in something to view but as in money. It cost about 10 euro when we were there in 2014.
    Take note of the first picture. Imagine getting a 3,000 piece jigsaw and only having 1,000 pieces to work with. That's the sort of dilemma these people face. I'm so glad that some people have the patience to do this type of work because I couldn't hack it yet I love looking at what they have achieved.

    One of the numerous jigsaws Painstaking work by the Austrians A  work in progress Fresco detail in the Terrace Houses Mosaic in the Terrace Houses
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  • Priene

    by aaron60 Written Aug 4, 2005

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    Priene was a welcome relief from crowded Ephesus. A dramatic setting with a haunting beauty. There is a peacefulness here. You can hear the wind sighing in the pine boughs. The theatre and the Temple of Demeter are breathtaking.

    Don't miss Priene if you get a chance to visit.
    I'd choose it over Miletus if time were a factor.

    Temple of Demeter, Priene
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