Curettes Road, Ephesus

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  • Ephesus - Curetes Street
    Ephesus - Curetes Street
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Ephesus - Curetes Street
    Ephesus - Curetes Street
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Ephesus - Curetes Street
    Ephesus - Curetes Street
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Trajan's Fountain

    by solopes Updated Dec 20, 2013

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    Trajan

    I admire those guys that, starting from 3 or 4 stones near each other, imagine the whole puzzle, and rebuild... the possible. Reading (or listening to) the description, while watching the mounted stones, everything seems reasonable, and we can imagine what is missing. But... when everything was piled in the floor, how could they start? "Chapeau!"

    They say this was Trajan's fountain! Why not?

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    A Large collection of ruins

    by solopes Updated Dec 20, 2013

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    Ephesus - Turkey

    The main street, named Curetes, is lined with lots of ruins, most of them impossible to identify or just imagine what they were in the old days until you listen to a guide - then everything is explained in detail.

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    Heracles Gate

    by solopes Updated Dec 20, 2013
    Ephesus - Turkey
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    Located in the beginning of Curetes street, this gate seems to have been part of a two-storey building.

    Well, if they say so I have no reason to doubt, but in place it is hard to extract a clear idea from that amount of stones.

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    Domician Temple

    by solopes Updated Dec 20, 2013

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    Domician temple

    Each set of stones has a name. Of course, I do believe the honesty of the studies, and the accuracy of the identification, but, here and there is hard to guess the original building, and how they identified it. Domician Temple, they say!

    OK. Domician Temple, I say. But don't ask me more details. You have to go there, read the lines, and use your imagination.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Gate of Hercules

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

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    Located towards the end of Curetes Street, this gate was called the Hercules Gate because of the relief of Hercules on it. It was brought from another place in the fourth century AD to its current place, but the relief on it dates back to the second century AD. Only the two side of the columns remain today and the other parts of it have not been found. The relief of the flying Nike in the Domitian Square is thought to also be a part of this gate. The gate narrowed the access to the street, preventing the passage of vehicles.

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    Fountain of Trajan

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

    Built around 104 AD, this is one of the finest monuments in Ephesus. It was constructed for the honour of Emperor Trajan and the statue of Trajan stood in the central niche on the facade overlooking the pool.

    The pool of the fountain of Trajan was 20x10 meters, surrounded by columns and statues. These statues were of Dionysus, Satyr, Aphrodite and the family of the Emperor. They are now displayed in the Ephesus Museum in Selcuk.

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    Most famous street at Ephesus

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    This street is the most famous of the three remaining main streets at Ephesus and leads uphill from the Library of Celsus. It took its name from the priests who were called Curetes and their names were written in the Prytaneion.

    There were fountains, monuments, statues and shops on either side of the street. The shops on the south side were two-storied. Ephesus had many earthquakes in which many structures including Curetes Street were damaged. These damages affected columns which were restored, but after an earthquake in the 4th century, the columns were replaced by ones brought from different buildings in the city. The differences between the design of the columns can be seen today. The street takes its appearance from the 4th century. There were also many houses on the slope of the hill which were used by the richest of Ephesians. Under the houses there were colonnaded galleries with mosaics on the floor. Located in front of the shops was a roof to protect the pedestrians from sun or rain.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Curetes Street

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    Ephesus - Curetes Street
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    It is the diagonal street that runs from the State Agora, past the Slope Houses, to the Library of Celsus. Curetes Street was both a main city street and an important processional route in the cult of Artemis.
    The street assumed its final appearance in the 4th and 5th centuries.

    There were fountains, monuments, statues and shops on the sides of the street. The shops on the south side were two-storied. Ephesus had many earthquakes, in which many structures including the Curetes Street were damaged.

    You can watch my 3 min 19 sec Video clip Ephesus Part II with J.Bach – Air on the D String, from Orchestral Suite No.4.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Curetes Street : the shops

    by JLBG Written Jan 2, 2009

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    Curetes Street : the shops

    Each shop was a single vaulted room but was connected to an upper level. At the far end of the room, stairs allowed to climb to the upper level, standing on the slopes of Mount Pion, in recess. This is where the shopkeepers lived. There was actually several superimposed levels of houses, connected both by external and by internal stairs. This was the wealthy part of the city as traders were those that had the wealth.

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    Curetes Street : the sidewalks.

    by JLBG Written Jan 2, 2009

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    Curetes Street : the sidewalks.

    This photo shows the sidewalk, designated for pedestrians while the street was designated for horse drawn carriages. The street shows on the right of the photo. Each of the sidewalks was almost the same width than the main street : they were the place where citizens wandered quietly while the street itself was for transport.

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    Curetes Street : Trojan's Fountain

    by JLBG Written Jan 2, 2009

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    Curetes Street : Trojan's Fountain

    North to Curetes Street stands Trojan fountain. It was built between 102 and 114 AD. It was shaken down by earthquakes and has now been partly rebuilt : it is now 6-7 m high while originally, it was 12 m high. The statues of Dionysos, of Aphrodite, of a satyr and of relatives of Emperor Trojan, to whom it was dedicated, are on display in the museum.

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    Curetes Street

    by JLBG Written Jan 2, 2009

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    Curetes Street

    Curetes Street is the main street that leads from Hercule’s gate to Celsius library. On the photo, Celsus library (see other tip) shows in the background, at the end of the road, a little on the left. The street is paved with marble slabs. It has an underground system of pipes.

    Sidewalks were protected from the sun under galleries held by decorated columns. Shops had their door opening in the gallery. The soil was decorated with mosaics. Most of Curetes street was built in the IIIth AD

    Several earthquakes hit Ephesus and there does not remain much more of the buildings that framed Curetes street than the base of the columns.

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    Curettes Street

    by apbeaches Written Jul 17, 2008

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    The famous Curettes Street passed through Ephesus. Of particular interest on the eastern part of the street are the Pollio (4th century A.D.) and Traian (2nd century A.D.) Fountains, the Memmius Monument (1st. century A.D.), the elegant facade of the Temple of Hadrianus , the Skolasticia Baths (2nd cent. A.D.), and the Heracles Gate . Set on the hillside above the street are the restored Terraced Houses , containing interesting, often well preserved frescoes from the 2nd century A.D.

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Interesting Street/Road

    by fachd Written Dec 22, 2007

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    Curetes is a street name after the semi god and semi goddesses and later referred to a class of priests. It is located in the middle of the city. You can walk the Curetes from Heracles Gate to Celcus Library with a distance of about one kilometre. The street is decorated by important monumental structures like Hercules, Trajan Fountain the Hadrian Temple or the statue without a head.

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  • Lyndra's Profile Photo

    High Street: Ephesus Style

    by Lyndra Written Jul 14, 2007

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    The very wide main road that runs through Ephesus has become known as Curetes Street. This was not its original name but one given by archaeologists since they found an inscription to th ePriests ofArtemis (or Curetes) on this road. The street runs through most of the length of the site and walking along it you will pass the hillside houses excavation and eventually you will get to the Library of Celsus.
    This road is very crowded with tours that will stop suddenly to look at columns and crevices so you need to keep your wits about you as you walk. The road has some uneven portions and some marble slabs are quite slippy so watch your footing. This road and the site in fact go downhill from start to finish area.
    The road would have been important as a processional route during worship to Artemis. The road is unusual inthat it is diagonal and does not follow the usual grid pattern of these cities.

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