Grand Theatre, Ephesus

42 Reviews

  • Large Theatre and the Gymnasium
    Large Theatre and the Gymnasium
    by mindcrime
  • Inside the Grand Theatre
    Inside the Grand Theatre
    by obcbreeze
  • View from the Grand Theatre
    View from the Grand Theatre
    by obcbreeze

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Large Theatre and the Gymnasium

    by mindcrime Written Jun 22, 2015

    The Large Theatre is one of the first things you’ll see if you enter Ephesus from Lower Gate and in my humble opinion more impressive than Celsius Library (where you actually see the re-erected façade only) and in any case one of the few places in Ephesus where you can actually rest for a while :) Modern singers have played live here (eg.Elton John, Sting, Jose Carreras), this must be a nice experience.

    It was originally built during the 3rd century (Hellenistic period) in semi-circle shape but was enlarged during the roman period. It could house 25,000 spectators on the 66 rows of seats. People were coming here for theatrical plays and music but also for political or religious events (the Boulea of aristocracy had their session in the small theatre while the Demos’ sessions were taken place here in the large one). Of course the romans must had gladiators and animal fights here too. Personally the information I found most impressive was the fact that probably this was the place where the dramatic confrontation between St Paul and the followers of Artemis took place.

    To the NW west of the Theatre was the Theatre Gymnasium, a large complex of about 12,000 sq meters that housed bathing rooms, recreation and lobby halls, an open courtyard (palaestra) where people had physical training but also mental activities. It was built in 125AD

    Large Theatre and the Gymnasium
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    Great Theatre

    by solopes Updated Dec 20, 2013

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    The biggest construction remaining in Ephesus, and the most impressive after the Library is the great theatre.

    Built under Greek influence, it was enlarged and transformed by the Romans, an, despite the effects of time and earthquakes, it still impresses by its size and wise conception, integrated in the hills.

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  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    25,000 capacity!

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

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    Great is an understatement! This massive 25,000 capacity theatre dominates your eyes after entering through the northern entrance and is one Ephesus' most famous sights. It's located on the slope of Panayir Hill and used to overlook the harbour via Harbour Street. It was first constructed in the Hellenistic Period, in the third century BC during the reign of Lysimachos, one of the generals of Alexander the Great, but, then during the Roman Period, was enlarged and formed its current structure that is seen today.

    It is the largest in Anatolia and has sixty six rows of seats, divided by two diazoma (walkway between seats) into three horizontal sections making three sections of seats. In the lower section, marble pieces, used for restoration, and the Emperor's Box were found. The seats with backs, made of marble, were reserved for important people. The audience entered from the upper cavea.

    The stage building was three-storied and 18 meters high. The facade facing the audience was ornamented with reliefs, columns with niches, windows and statues. There are five doors opening to the orchestra area, the middle one of which is wider than the rest. This enhanced the appearance of the stage, giving it a bigger, monumental look.

    The theatre was used not only for concerts and plays, but also for religious, political and philosophical discussions and for gladiator and animal fights.

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Great Theater

    by Tom_Fields Written Feb 15, 2010

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    Built mostly under the Roman emperors Claudius (first century AD) and Trajanus (second century), this theater could seat 25,000. This was the scene of the dramatic confrontation between St Paul and the followers of Artemis. Archeologists continue to unearth parts of it.

    The sound is phenomenal; I was standing near the top row of seats, when a Christian choir began singing. It sounded like they were just a few feet away. They just don't build them like this any more.

    The theater
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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    The great Theatre

    by mvtouring Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    This has been unearted year by year continuously. The last building alterations were done in 98 - 117 A.D The teatre had a capacity of 25,000 spectators with 22 flights of stairs, each set by three circular rows. The theatre has a diametre of 50m.
    Most of the stone stair seats were carried away to be used in other constructions.

    Great Theatre

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE THEATRE

    by balhannah Written Jul 12, 2009

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    Make sure that you go here and have a look. Just go and sit in the steep Stand, and imagine what it would have been like amongst 24,999 other people! Imagine what it would have been like to walk out into the arena, wow!
    It was designed for Theatrical presentations and later, when some alterations were done, probably by the Romans, Gladiatoral contests were held here. It was built in the Hellenistic period, in the 3rd Century BC. Its a magnificent structure!!

    Magnificent Theatre Imagine what it would have been like!
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Great Theater

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    At an estimated 44,000 seating capacity, it is believed to be the largest outdoor theater in the ancient world.
    It was first constructed during the Hellenistic period, although the present structure dates from the 1-2nd centuries AD. The Theatre has three cavea, each 22 rows, to which access was obtained via flights of steps between the cavea.

    The scene is 18 m. in height and the inner facade was ornamented with reliefs, columns, blind niches, windows and decorated with statues on three levels.

    You can watch my 2 min 35 sec Video clip Ephesus Part IV with Mozart – Andante from Piano Concerto No.2 in F Major “Elvira Madigan”.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    The main theater

    by JLBG Written Jan 2, 2009

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    The Great theater can accommodate an audience of 44,000 (others say 25,000 but I have not checked myself). It is thought to be the largest theater of the Roman world.

    It was built using the slope of Mount Panyir. It was first built in the Vth BC during the Hellenistic Period but underwent main alterations in the following centuries, especially under Emperor Claudius, in 31-32 AD. Its diameter is154 m and the highest row is 38 m high.

    In the modern time, it is used for concerts and other shows.

    The main theater The main theater
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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Great Theater

    by nicolaitan Updated Dec 6, 2008

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    The largest and most impressive site in the Ephesus excavations is the Great Theater set at the head of Arcadian Street on the north slope of Mt. Pion. Traditionally Lysimachus selected the site in the 3rd C BC and began an excavation of 60 years duration. An initially small theater built in 40 AD replaced an earlier Greek theater and was steadily enlarged till the 5th C including repairs from a massive earthquake in the 4th C. The theater became part of the city defenses in the Dark Ages, then was lost to time until Austrian archaeologists uncovered it beginning in 1894 and continuing till current where most efforts are devoted to the stage house area.

    The theater rises over 100 feet and seats 25,000 in 66 rows divided into three horizontal sections with the best marble in the lower area reserved for VIPs. The stage building is three stories high and was decorated with reliefs, columns, statues, and windows facing the audience. The presentations included concerts and plays but also religious and philosophical discussions. In the later Roman era, gladiator fights were featured.

    Perhaps most famously, the apostle Paul, who spent three years making tents and preaching the Gospel in Ephesus, delivered a sermon here condemning pagan worship. The great theater was also the site of the "riot of the silversmiths", who made their living selling silver replicas of Artemis and whose livelihood was threatened by Paul and other early Christians. Their slogan - Long Live Artemis of the Ephesians - lives on in history. Today the major cultural event here is the Selcuk Ephesus Festival of Culture and Art held annually in May.

    From Arcadian Way The Stage Building

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  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    The Grand Theater

    by aukahkay Written Nov 21, 2008

    At an estimated 44,000 seating capacity, it is believed to be the largest outdoor theater in the ancient world. It is still used nowadays for concerts in summer. World famous performers including the late Luciano Pavarotti have performed in this Theater.

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  • mikelisaanna's Profile Photo

    The theater

    by mikelisaanna Written Sep 9, 2008

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    Ephesus has one of the largest and best-preserved ampitheaters of any Greek or Roman ruin in Turkey. In its day, the theater held over 20,000 people. It is built into the side of a hill, and most of its seating still remains. The stage section is partially preserved as well.

    The theater is open to tourists, and you can expore it for as long as you want. After a hot day of walking, it was nice to actually have a place to sit down!

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  • Snipernurse's Profile Photo

    Great Theatre

    by Snipernurse Updated Jul 1, 2008

    Get there early. If you arrive at 8 am you can have the whole theatre to yourself to conjure up all kinds of imagination of plays of past, of gladiators and wrestlers of past. Imagine how magnificant this building may have been at one time.

    P.S. This theatre is mentioned in Acts 19:29-41

    *Check out my short video that displays a little bit of Ephesus. It is of 1 star quality and content however.

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    One of the best preserve Ancient Theatre

    by fachd Updated Dec 20, 2007

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    The grand theatre at Ephesus is the most prominent and impressive sight. It was built in the slopes of Mt Pion. It was originally constructed during Hellenistic period under the reign of Lysimachus in the 3rd century BC. It was he who relocated Ephesus to its present site.

    During her history it was improved, enlarged and refined by the Roman emperors by the name of Claudius, Augustus, Nero and Trajan. The Emperor and rich Roman spectators gather at the theatre to listened musical concert, to be entertained by artist performing theatrical play, to see gladiators fighting to the death and animal fights. It was also used for political and religious gatherings.

    St Paul the early Christian preached and sermon to the large audience at this theatre. He was preaching and condemning paganism

    From bird’s eye view the theatre has semi circle shape. It has sitting sections for the spectators, the centre stage and section for the orchestra and actors. It can accommodate 17,000 to 25,000 excited spectators.

    To improve the acoustics bronze and clay sounding vessels were placed around the auditorium. Even today the acoustic is still great and modern performances are still being held here. Artist like Elton John, Jose Carreras, Sting have actually performed in this theatre. I am not quite sure if today performances will damage the fragile theatre.

    Go to the top of the theatre and you would be able to see bird’s eye view of ancient city of Ephesus.

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  • Lyndra's Profile Photo

    Ancient Theatre of Ephesus

    by Lyndra Updated Jul 14, 2007

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    This theatre is fantastic, set into the side of Mount Pion. You walk from the Library of celsus along the Marble Road to get to the theatre. There is no shade in this part of the site and to access the theatre you have to climb some stairs (hard work as they are quite steep). When you enter the theatre you are met with a superbly preserved Roman style theatre.
    Originally built during the Hellenistic period but heavily remodelled and adapted by the Roman emperors. There is a stage area still in tact and you can see quite easily th original seating areas and those that have been reconstructed. This theatre could seat 25000 people but this was only a fraction of the population of Ephesus. St Paul delivered a sermon to the early Christians in this theatre.

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    The Grand Theatre

    by Paul2001 Written Apr 25, 2007

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    The Grand Theatre is one of the most spectacular monuments in Ephesus. It is dramatically set against the slopes of Mt. Pion. Apparently it took sixty years to excavate and then construct the theatre. When completed it could seat 25,000 people. The theatre was originally built during Hellenistic times but had been restored, rebuilt and expanded many times since most notably during the Roman reign of Claudius. Supposedly St. Paul gave a sermon from the proscenium. I recommend that you climb to the top of the theatre and take in the marvelous views of Ephesus that can be seen from here.

    The Grand Theatre The Grand Theatre
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