Hadrian Temple, Ephesus

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  • Curetes Street : Temple of Hadrian
    Curetes Street : Temple of Hadrian
    by JLBG
  • Ephesus - Temple of Hadrian
    Ephesus - Temple of Hadrian
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Hadrian Temple
    by Gypsystravels
  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hadrian

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

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    This is one of the best preserved and most beautiful structures on Curetes Street. It was built before 138 AD by P. Quintilius and was dedicated to Emperor Hadrian, who came to visit the city from Athens in 128 AD. The facade of the temple has four Corinthian columns supporting a curved arch, in the middle of which contains a relief of Tyche, goddess of victory. The side columns are square. The pedestals with inscriptions in front of the temple, are the bases for the statues of the emperors between 293-305 AD - Diocletian, Maximian, Constantius I, and Galerius; the originals of the statues have not been found.

    Inside the temple above the door, a human figure, probably Medusa, stands with ornaments of acanthus leaves. On both sides there are friezes depicting the story of the foundation of Ephesus - Androklos shooting a boar, Dionysus in ceremonial procession and the Amazons. The fourth frieze portrays two male figures, one of which is Apollo; Athena, goddess of the moon; a female figure, Androkles, Herakles, the wife and son of Theodosius and the goddess Athena. The friezes that are seen today are copies, with the originals being displayed in the Ephesus Museum in Selcuk.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Hadrian Temple

    by mvtouring Written Oct 27, 2009

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    On Curetes street you will find Hadrian's Temple. We were told that Hadrian wanted a temple built in his honor, but that there was not really space, so they erected this little temple, but put the head of Medusa on it. Hadrian was very "bygelowig" and would not enter as he believed that it would bring bad luck, but was happy about the temple. He never knew that it was such a small temple.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hadrian

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    Ephesus - Temple of Hadrian
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    This Temple is one of the best preserved and most beautiful structures on Curetes Street. It was built in the 2nd century A.D and was dedicated to the Emperor Hadrian, who came to visit the city from Athens.

    Its tympanum bears an interesting frieze that may depict Medusa.
    Corinthian columns on the facade support a triangular arched frieze, highly decorative in character, which contains a relief of Tyche, goddess of victory. A vaulted roof covers the colonnaded portico. Four statue bases front the building.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Curetes Street : Temple of Hadrian, Medusa.

    by JLBG Written Jan 2, 2009

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    Curetes Street : Temple of Hadrian, Medusa.
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    On the Tympan, on top of the entrance into the naos, stands the bust of a human figure, arms widely open. It looks like Medusa, with her hair made of snakes. It is framed with acanthus leaves and stylized flowers.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Curetes Street : Temple of Hadrian, the frieze

    by JLBG Written Jan 2, 2009

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    Curetes Street : Temple of Hadrian, the frieze
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    A frieze made of four elements stands on top of the pronaos. Actually, the original is on display in the museum and when the temple was rebuilt, a copy was substituted. The frieze represents various gods and goddess (Athena, Selene, Apollo, Dionysos, Androclès, etc), Amazons close relatives of Emperor Theodose. Androclès, the mythical founder of the city and others.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Curetes Street : Temple of Hadrian

    by JLBG Written Jan 2, 2009

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    Curetes Street : Temple of Hadrian
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    Temple of Hadrian is the most luxurious of all the monuments that line Curetes Street. It was built before 138 AD.

    On the photos, the front of the temple, with four columns, is seen from Curetes Street. The lintels are richly decorated with vines, flowers and pearls. The two middle columns are topped by a carved arch. On top of the arch, stands the face of Tykhè, a local goddess (photo 3).

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  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hadrian

    by aukahkay Written Nov 21, 2008
    Temple of Hadrian
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    The Temple of Hadrian dates from the 2nd century but underwent repairs in the 4th century and has been reerected from the surviving architectural fragments. The reliefs in the upper sections are casts, the originals being now exhibited in the Selçuk Archaeological Museum. A number of figures are depicted in the reliefs, including the emperor Theodisius I with his wife and eldest son.

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  • mikelisaanna's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hadrian

    by mikelisaanna Written Sep 10, 2008

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    The entry to the Temple of Hadrian
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    The Temple of Hadrian is a small temple that was built to commemorate a visit by Emperor Hadrian to Ephesus in the 2nd century AD. Part of the facade of the temple is still standing, which features some intricate stone carvings.

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  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    Hadrian's Temple

    by apbeaches Written Jul 17, 2008

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    Hadrian's Temple is one of the best preserved and most beautiful structures on Curetes Street. It was built before 138 A.D by P.Quintilius and was dedicated to the Emperor Hadrian, who came to visit the city from Athens in 128 A.D The facade of the temple has four Corinthian columns supporting a curved arch, in the middle of which contains a relief of Tyche, goddess of victory. The side columns are square. The pedestal with inscriptions in front of the temple, are the bases for the statues of the emperors between 293-305 CE, Diocletian, Maximian, Constantius I, and Galerius; the originals of the statues have not been found yet.

    Inside the temple above the door, a human figure, probably Medusa stands with ornaments of acanthus leaves. On both sides there are friezes depicting the story of the foundation of Ephesus - Androklos shooting a boar, Dionysus in ceremonial procession and the Amazons. The fourth frieze portrays two male figures, one of which is Apollo; Athena, goddess of the moon; a female figure, Androkles, Herakles, the wife and son of Theodosius and the goddess Athena. The friezes that are seen today are copies, and the originals are displayed in Ephesus Museum

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    Small edifice compare to others but well preserved

    by fachd Written Dec 21, 2007

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    Temple of Hadrian
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    This Corinthian style architecture is the Temple of Hadrian located in Curetes street. It is small in structure compare to other edifices but beautiful and well preserved. The temple was built by Quintilius around 118 AD to dedicate Emperor Hadrian and renovated in fifth century.

    From the frontal view they are four Corinthian columns and inside the temple on top of the archway could be Medusa holding ornaments of acanthus leaves and her snake’s hair. Do not look at her you might turn to stone. On her opposite on the wall are other mythological figures.

    Next to the temple there’s stairs which lead to the Scholastica baths which was created in the fourth century.

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  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    Hadrian's Temple

    by Paul2001 Written Apr 1, 2006

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    Hadrian's Temple

    Hadrian's Temple is one of the most popular of the ruins located in Ephesus. In fact it is one of the most famous images of Turkey, often being reproduced in travel brocheres. The temple was built in the 2nd century A.D. in the Corinthian style. It consists of a cella and a porch. The facade of the porch is supported by two piers and two columns with an arch at the centre top. Although you can not see it here because of the shadow, there is a relief of Tyche at the keystone of the arch. However you can see the image of the Medusa beyond the facade in the lunette over the entrance to the cella. There are many other quality friezes within the temple that are worth seeing. In fact it is here that I seemed to find the most crowded section of Ephesus.

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  • namidub's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hadrian

    by namidub Written Feb 11, 2006

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    Temple of Hadrian
    1 more image

    Located on the street of the Curettes, is one of the better preserved buildings at Ephesus. According to the inscription over the architrave it was constructed by P.Quintilius between 118-138 A.D., and dedicated to the emperor Hadrian.

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  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    the hadrian's temple

    by globetrott Updated Apr 28, 2005

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    Ephesus - Hadrian's temple

    This is another pic of the Hadrian's temple, so you may see the dimensions and great columns. Directely behind the temple is still a big hill of un-explored area and it could easily be, thast the rest of the temple will be found there one day. Excavations are taking a long time unfortunately and other parts of town will need it more urgently.

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  • guell's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hadrian

    by guell Updated Aug 2, 2004

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    Hadrian's Temple

    The Temple of Hadrian, located on the street of the Curettes that leads to the Library of Celsus, is one of the best-preserved structures in Ephesus. The temple was constructed by P.Quintilius between 118-138 A.D. and was dedicated to the emperor Hadrian. Look for the two friezes flanking the portals. They represent scenes from the foundation of Ephesus, and include figures of deities and Amazons.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Curetes Street

    by mvtouring Written Jul 2, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Curetes Street

    Theodosius restored this temple in 391 A.D and opened it to the public in honour of his father General Theodosius who was hanged innocently. The ruins in front of the temple belonged to the the rich. The little sculptures of Medusa and other's on the second wall is really fantastic and worth a closer look

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