Fun things to do in Ephesus

  • Portico of Alyterch
    Portico of Alyterch
    by Mikebb
  • Library of Celsus  - Exterior
    Library of Celsus - Exterior
    by Mikebb
  • Library of Celsus - Inside
    Library of Celsus - Inside
    by Mikebb

Most Viewed Things to Do in Ephesus

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    The ancient city of Ephesus

    by Avieira67 Updated Jun 11, 2014

    The Amphitheatre - This theatre was contructed in the Hellenistic age and renovated in the first and second A.D. The seating area, cavea, consists of three horizontal sections and has a capacity of 25.000 seats. The stage building, scene frons, had three stories and rose to a height of 18 m. During the late Roman peeriod, this was the site of gladiatorial contests.
    The Library of Celsus - It was built by the Consul Gaius Julius Aquila in 135 AD. as a heroon in honour of his father, Celsus Polemaeanus, the governor of Asia Minor.
    The Fountain of Trajan - This monument was buil in honour of the Emperor Trajan [98-117AD]. The statue of him stood in the central niche on the façade overlooking the pool. The pool was 20m long and 10m wide and was surrounded by columns and statues. These statues were Dionysus, Satyr, Aphrodite and the family of the Emperor. They are now presented in Ephesus Museum.
    The Odeon - This structure, devoted both to civic meetings and to musical and theatrical performances, was constructed by Vedius Antonius and his wife Papiana in the second century A.D. It has a capacity of 1400 people.

    The Library of Celsus The Fountain of Trajan The Odeon

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    Harbour Street

    by solopes Updated Apr 26, 2014

    In Ephsus all the ways lead to Celsius library, the top attraction in the center of town.

    You may use two entrances: Harbour gate or Magnesian gate. This one stays in the highest point, which allows you to do the visit descending the city, as we did (twice).

    Harbour street is generally the last vision to the visitors, already "filled" with the visions of the successive ruins, and the Harbour street only impresses by its width and straightness.

    Ephesus - Turkey
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    Sirince

    by muratkorman Written Oct 30, 2011

    Sirince is a lovely village which prospered by tourism in the area. You can taste fruit wines, buy souvenirs, enjoy a meal and walk around the village. Most tourist groups stop by in this village and the locals earn their living from the tourists. I think it's a relaxing place to stop by and the fruit wines are not to be missed.

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    Isa Bey Mosque

    by muratkorman Updated Oct 30, 2011

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    The Ýsabey Mosque was constructed in 1374-1375. It is one of the oldest and most impressive works of architectural art remaining from the Anatolian beyliks. The mosque is situated between the Saint Jean Church and the remains of the Temple of Artemis. The interesting part of this mosque is the inscriptions and geometric shapes engraved on the western wall.

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    Ephesus

    by muratkorman Written Oct 30, 2011

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    Ephesus contains the largest collection of Roman ruins in the eastern Mediterranean with only an estimated 15% has been excavated. The main sites of this ancient city can be listed as : The library of Celsus, Basilica of St. John, Temple of Artemis, The Odeon, Temple of Hadrian, Temple of Domitian, The Theater, 2 Agoras and Tomb/Fountain of Pollio. Although some of these remarkable sites such as Temple of Artemis which is one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, do not exist anymore, Ephesus is an ancient city where you can travel in time and find yourself in another era. I especially refrain from giving detailed information about each of these main sites as you can find them in many other tips prepared by fellow VT members. I will provide you some Travelogues from our visit to Ephesus so that you can visualize it more like that. The entrance to Ephesus is 20 TL. There is toilet available before the entrance and also just near the exit. Consider that in mind as you are likely to spend minimum 3 hours or more in this area.

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  • Recommended Guide for Ephesus

    by mka1881 Written Dec 14, 2010

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    It would be hard for our guide (Dennis) and tour (Ephesus) to have been any better. Honest. If the opposite was true I would tell you that as well. Dennis (and our driver) were great. Dennis is knowledgable, speaks English very well, gave us time to look at things longer as we desired, took pictures, answered questions intelligently etc etc. It truly was great. We are not really experienced travelers, and I was a bit nervous at first taking a “non Royal Carribean sponsored" tour. My confidence rose after talking with our travel agent (Cathy) who recommended www.transbalkan.com in the first place. Again, it truly was a great experience all the way around.

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  • Sirince

    by merak Written Oct 20, 2010

    Sirince is a small village in the mountains near Selcuk. Before 1923 it was inhabited by Greeks, and there is still a church to be seen. In the town there are many shops which sell wine (also true peach wine!) and olive oil (sizma is extra virgin). You will get served better food if you go there by your own by bus and not whith a tourist group. Go there by bus from Selcuk. Another place to be reached by bus from Selcuk is the famous Kushadasi. But for sure it is cheaper to stay in Selcuk.

    Shirinjeah (Sirince) near Selcuk
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  • Great Guided tour around Ephesus

    by johnbiles Written May 1, 2010

    We had a great tour guide around Ephesus. I booked the tour over the internet before arriving later by cruise ship. Emre Ates met us at the Kusaadasi cruise terminal. We were comfortably transported by mini bus to the historic site and he remained with us for the whole tour. He was knowledgable informative & highly amusing.After the tour we were invited into a local restaurant for a miday meal. From there we were again transported back to Kusadai where he advised us on which shops to buy certain goods. He introduced us to a local shopkeeper who provided us with a welcome drink. Amazingly there was no hard sell from the shops he recommended. The whole tour is thoroughly recommended. We paid a $20 deposit online when booking and a further $80 in cash on the day.- Far cheaper than the cruise ship was charging. The tour web site is www.kusadasitours.com & email is emre@kusadsitours.com. The whole trip lasts for about 7 hours. - You won't be disappointed.

    Brilliant Tour
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    East Gymnasium

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

    This is one of at least four gymnasiums at Ephesus, located to the east of the southern entrance, along the road. This building was actually a bath-gymnasium complex, erected around the 2nd century AD. There was a lecture hall (palaestra) at the entrance. During the excavations, the statues of the healing god Asclepius, Aphrodite, Dionysus, Hygeia, Pan were found here and are on display in the Izmir Archaeology Museum.

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    Bath of Varius

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

    The ruins to the east of the Basilica belong to the Bath of Varius, dating to the 2nd century AD. Mosaics in the 40 metre long corridor date to the 5th century. It is built of cut blocks of marble and has three sections, frigidarium (cold water), tepidarium (warm water) and caldarium (hot water).

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    Basilica

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

    This is a typical Roman Basilica. It is 160 meters long and located on the northern part of the state agora with a nave and three-aisles. The Ionic columns are adorned with bulls head figures dating to the 1st century AD.

    The basilica was used for stock exchange and commercial business. Meetings of the law courts were also held here. It has three gates opening onto a stoa leading to the Bath of Varius. The statues of Augustus and his wife Livia were found at the east end, and are now displayed in the Ephesus Museum in Selcuk. It was destroyed by an earthquake in the middle of the fourth century AD.

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    Temples of Dea Roma and Divus Julius Caesar

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

    Located between the Prytaneion and the Odeon are these two temples. They were Imperial Cult erected in the first century AD with the permission of Augustus in honour of his adoptive father Julius Caesar, and of Rome. The Imperial Cult never became a true religion. They aimed to have good relationships with emperors. There was an altar serving the worship of Artemis and Augustus.

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    Prytaneion

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

    Behind the basilica is the Prytaneion, where religious ceremonies, official receptions and banquets were held. The sacred flame symbolising the heart of Ephesus was kept constantly alight in the Prytaneion. The construction of the building dates to the 3rd century BC, during the reign of Lysimachos, but the ruins of the complex date to the Augustan age.

    The four-cornered pit in which the sacred fire was burned is a relic from the reign of Lysimachos. The front of the building has four columns, beyond which is a courtyard surrounded by a portico, the ceremonial hall and side rooms. The eternal flame was located in the centre of the ceremonial hall, the red colour of the floor determined the location of the flame. Towards the back, there was a large area with a wooden roof, the base of an altar is still recognisable today.

    The double columns on the corners of the hall held up a wooden roof. During excavations, archaeologists found 2 Artemis statues, which are now displayed in the Ephesus museum in Selcuk.

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    Temple of Isis

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

    Ephesus throughout its history always had a large Egyptian population and Isis was a very important Egyptian goddess. She is the wife and sister of Osiris and the mother of Horus. There was a temple of Isis which was rectangular in shape and located in the centre of the State Agora. The temple was built during the Hellenistic period when Ephesus had close relations with Alexandria but was destroyed during the reign of Emperor Augustus because of Augustus’ hostility towards Anthony and Cleopatra. Some of the parts of this building was used for the construction of The Pollio Fountain.

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    Water Palace/Hydrekdocheion

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010

    Located on the southwest corner of the State Agora there are the remains of a fountain. According to an inscription the construction of this fountain was ordered by Gaius Laecanius Bassus in 80-82 AD. The facade was constructed by Bassus, one of the governors of Ephesus, and was richly decorated with two floors which faced the street. The statues of Tritons and Muses (sea creatures and river gods), which were found at the fountain, are now on display at the Ephesus Museum in Selcuk. Because of the enormous size of the fountain it is also referred to as the "Water Palace".

    This fountain is connected to another fountain located just opposite it to the west of the State Agora, and also to a storage cistern. The main section consists of a body in the form of a semicircle and was built in the 2nd century AD. The fountain building aligned with Domitian Lane and the terrace of the Temple of Domitian. The main basin measured 12.35m by 8.30m, which served as a water reservoir.

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