Odeon (small theatre), Ephesus

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  • Ephesus - Odeum
    Ephesus - Odeum
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Ephesus - Odeum
    Ephesus - Odeum
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Ephesus - Odeum
    Ephesus - Odeum
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Willettsworld's Profile Photo

    Odeon

    by Willettsworld Written Mar 7, 2010
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    This building has the shape of a small theatre with a stage building, seating places and the orchestra. It had two functional uses. First it was used as a Bouleuterion for the meetings of the Boulea or the Senate. The second function was the Odeum - a concert hall for performances. It was constructed in the 2nd century AD by the order of Publius Vedius Antonius and his wife Flavia paiana, two wealthy citizens of Ephesus.

    It had a capacity of 1500 spectators and had 3 doors opening from the stage to the podium. The podium was narrow and one meter higher than the orchestra section. The stage building was two-storeyed and embellished with columns. The podium in front of the stage building and some parts of the seating have been restored. The Odeon used to be enclosed with a wooden roof.

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Odeon

    by Tom_Fields Written Feb 15, 2010
    The Odeon
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    The Odeon, or small theater, was also called the Bouleuterion, since the local Senate or Boulea met there. Vedius Antonious and his wife had it built in the second century AD. With 22 stairs, it could seat 1,500 people. Archeologists think that it may have had a roof, since there is no drainage system.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Odeon

    by mvtouring Updated Oct 27, 2009

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    This was constructed by Vedius Antonius and his wife in the 2nd century AD and was a small theatre used for plays and concerts, seating an audience of 1,500 people. It has 22 stairs conforming the shape of the theatre. The upper part was decorated with red granite pillars in the Corinthian style.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Odeum

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    Ephesus - Odeum
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    The Odeum is the building with the shape of a small theatre with the stage building, seating places and the orchestra. It had a capacity of about 1500 spectators.
    It was constructed by Publius Vedius Antoninus in the 2nd century AD.

    It had double function in use. First it was used as a Bouleuterion for the meetings of the Boulea or the Senate. The second function was the Odeum as a concert hall for the performances.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Bouleuterion or Small Theatre

    by JLBG Written Jan 2, 2009

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    Bouleuterion or Small Theatre

    The Bouleuterion wrongly called Small Theatre or Odeon was the meeting place of the city council or Senate, named boulé in ancient Greece. It could accommodate an audience of 1400. It was offered to the city by a wealthy citizen, Publius Vedius Antonius and his wife Flavia Papiana. It was built around 150 AD and had a roof. The bouleuterion stands on the slopes of Mount Pion.

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  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    The Small Theatre

    by nicolaitan Written Nov 23, 2008

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    The Odeon was built in the 2nd C AD by a wealthy Ephesian Publius Vedius Antonius and his wife Flavia Papiana according to an excavated plaque and served initially as the meeting place for the upper political council which governed Ephesus, the Bouleia or Senate. This was the aristocratic governing body and discussed the matters of greatest importance here. As years passed, it also came to be used for concerts and art events, hence the name. It is one of the highlights of Ephesus.
    The Odeon is set into a hillside and constructed of marble. It seats approximately 1500 in 23 rows divided into two sections vertically with larger seats nearer the stage. The difference in the quality of the marble used for the two sections of seats is clearly visible in the images. It was probably roofed as there are no gutters around the stage for rain water. The stage building was presumably contructed of wood and at least two levels high.

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  • apbeaches's Profile Photo

    Odeon

    by apbeaches Written Jul 17, 2008

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    Te Odeonis in the shape of a small theatre with the stage building, seating places and the orchestra.It had double function in use. First it was used as a Bouleuterion for the meetings of the Boulea or the Senate. The second function was the Odeum as a concert hall for the performances.It was constructed in the 2nd century A.D by the order of Publius Vedius Antonius and his wife Flavia paiana, two wealthy citizens in Ephesus.

    It had a capacity of 1500 spectators. It had 3 doors opening from the stage to the podium. The podium was narrow and one meter higher than the orchestra section. The stage building was two-storied and embellished with columns.The podium in front of the stage building and some parts of the seating were restored. The Odeon used to be enclosed with a wooden roof.

    Two councils administrated Ephesus. These were Demos or the parliament which was open to the public was taken place in the great theatre and the Bouleia which gathered in this small theatre. The members of the boulea were chosen from the aristocratic class of Ephesians. The most important decisions and city matters were discussed here.

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  • fachd's Profile Photo

    A Theatre with two functions

    by fachd Written Dec 27, 2007

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    The semicircle sunken stage
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    The Odeion (Bauleuterion) - The theatre has a semicircle shaped with a sunken semi circular stage. It can hold approximately 1,500 audiences.

    The theatre has two functions, the Odeion served as a small theatre and the Bauleuterion as a meeting place for the city council chambers.

    Rich Roman citizens by the name of Publius Vedius Antonius and his wife Flavia Papiane gave instruction to build the Odeion in 150AD.

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  • namidub's Profile Photo

    Bouleuterion Odeon , a small theatre

    by namidub Written Feb 10, 2006

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    A theatre for smaller crowd where state affairs and concerts were held.
    It has a capacity of 1450 people, and it was used mainly for the city council meetings.
    It has 3 doors opening from the stage to the podium. The podium is narrow and one meter higher than the orchestra section, which is next to the podium. The Odeon used to be enclosed with a wooden roof.

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  • whitecliff62's Profile Photo

    THE ODEON (SMALL THEATER)

    by whitecliff62 Updated Jan 7, 2006

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    THE ODEON, SMALL THEATER

    The Odeon has been greatly renovated over the years, it has twenty three seating rows and could accommadate 1400 people. At the front there is a half circular stage where the acts and musicions used to perform. It is believed that the Odeon was once a roofed building but no real proof of this actully exists

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  • Paul2001's Profile Photo

    The Odeon (or Odeum)

    by Paul2001 Written Apr 21, 2005

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    The Odeon

    The Odeon is a small theatre that sit at the top of the Cuertes Way. It was built by commission by Publius Vedius Antoninus and his wife Flavia Papiana, two wealthy citizens of Ephesus, in the 2nd century AD.
    The Odeon was used for state assemblies and for small theatre productions. Apparently it was completely enclosed and sat over 1450 persons.
    I hit the Odeon at the height of the tourist traffic. It was teaming with tour groups who were constantly getting the way of photo shots.

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  • TomorrowsAngel's Profile Photo

    odeion (bouleuterion)

    by TomorrowsAngel Written Sep 14, 2003

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    odeion

    The Odeion, in which State events and concerts were held, was ordered to be constructed, by Publius Vedius Antoninus and his wife Flavia Papiana, two wealthy citizens of Ephesus, in 2AD.
    The Odeion seated an audience of 1450 and was enclosed. Since the podium next to the orchestra and the stage section do not conform to the style of a typical Roman theatre, the structure was most likely used primarly as a meeting hall for the Municipal Council. The location of government structures alongside strengthens this view.

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  • whitecliff62's Profile Photo

    THE ODEON (LITTLE THEATRE)%c%

    by whitecliff62 Updated Jan 7, 2006

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    THE ODEON OR LITTLE THEATRE

    This is another photo of the upper Agora and the Odeon, the views from here are fantastic

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  • whitecliff62's Profile Photo

    THE ODEON (SMALL THEATRE)

    by whitecliff62 Updated Jan 7, 2006

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    THE ODEON OR SMALL THEATRE

    This photo shows the Odeon and one of the entrances which then continued up the vaulted stairways leading to the seats

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  • MikeAtSea's Profile Photo

    Odeion

    by MikeAtSea Written Mar 3, 2005

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    Odeion

    This semi circle theatre was built around 150 AD by one of the main families of Ephesus. It could seat 1400 spectators and was used for concerts and other entertainment.

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