Konya Favorites

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    by GIPA
  • Konya Downtown - Central Square
    Konya Downtown - Central Square
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Konya - Mevlana Museum
    Konya - Mevlana Museum
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey

Best Rated Favorites in Konya

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Konya historical background

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 20, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Konya Downtown - Central Square
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    Favorite thing: Konya is a large city on the central plateau of Anatolia. Now it has population about 1,5 million. Konya has a reach history and historically also known as Ikonion (Greek) and Iconium (Latin).
    Konya reached its height of wealth and influence as of the second half of the 12th century when Anatolian Seljuk sultans also subdued the Turkish Beyliks to their east, thus establishing their rule over virtually all of eastern Anatolia, as well as acquiring several port towns along the Mediterranean and the Black Sea and even gaining a momentary foothold in Crimea. This golden age lasted until the first decades of the 13th century.

    Alongside a generally high level of instruction and modern buildings, we have been told that Konya has a reputation of being one of the more religiously conservative metropolitan centers in Turkey. It was once known as the "citadel of Islam", and it is still more devout than other cities.

    You can watch my 3 min 11 sec Video clip Konya Slide-show with Turkish pop music by Petek Dincoz – Catilmis Kaslarinla.

    Fondest memory: You may watch my high resolution photo of Konya on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37° 52' 17.82" N 32° 29' 59.75" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Central Square .

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    • Historical Travel

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    Mevlana Museum

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 20, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Konya - Mevlana Museum
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    Favorite thing: The former dervish seminary attached to the mausoleum is now a museum devoted to manuscripts of Mevlana's works and various accoutrements of the sect.
    The tomb of the great Turkish thinker and mystic philosopher Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi is situated in The Konya Mevlana Dergah (dervish retreat). It was turned into a museum in 1927. It contains objects pertaining to Mevlana and the Mevlevi order.

    Rumi teachings expressed that love is the path to spiritual growth and insight. Broadly tolerant of all people and other faiths, he says,
    “Whoever you may be, come
    Even though you may be
    An infidel, a pagan, or a fire-worshipper, come
    Our brotherhood is not one of despair
    Even though you have broken
    Your vows of repentance a hundred times, come.”

    The Museum is open: May-October: Monday 10.00-18.00; Tuesday-Sunday 9.00-18.00.
    November-April: Tuesday-Sunday 9.00-18.00.
    Entrance fee – 5YTL (April, 2008).

    You may have Virtual Tour of Mevlana Museum.

    You can watch my 1 min 52 sec Video clip Konya Mevlana Museum with Turkish music.

    Fondest memory: You may watch my high resolution photo of Konya on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37° 52' 14.44" N 32° 30' 15.12" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Mevlana Museum .

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

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    sema ceremony

    by traveloturc Updated Nov 12, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    sema ceremony

    Favorite thing: Fix-footed, the semazen provides a point of contact with this Earth through which the divine blessings can flow. Turning from right to left, he embraces all creation as he chants the name of God within the heart. The Sema ritual consists of seven parts:
    1. It starts with the singing of the Nat-i-Serif, a eulogy to the Prophet Muhammed (peace be upon him), who represents love. Praising him is praising the truth of God that he and all the prophets before him brought.
    2. Then follows the call of the drum and the slap of glory, calling the semazens to awaken and Be. This begins the procession known as the Sultan Veled Walk. It is the salutation of one soul to another, acknowledged by bowing.
    3. Then begins the Sema ritual itself. It consists of four selams or salutes. The first selam is the birth of truth by way of knowledge. The second selam expresses the rapture of witnessing the splendor of creation. The third selam is the transformation of rapture into love; the sacrifice of mind and self to love. It represents complete submission and communion with God. The fourth selam is the semazen's coming to terms with his destiny and his return to his task in creation. In the fourth selam, the sheikh enters the circling dervishes, where he assumes the place of the sun in the center of the circling planets.
    4. The Sema end with a reading from the Qur'an. The sheikh and dervishes complete their time together with the greeting of peace and then depart, accompanied by joyous music of their departure.

    Fondest memory: One of the beauties of this seven-centuries-old ritual is the way that it unifies the three fundamental components of man's nature; mind, emotion, and spirit, combining them in a practice and a worship that seeks the purification of all three in the turning towards Divine Unity. But most significantly, the enrichment of this earth and the well-being of humanity as a whole.
    You can also watch thish video to have an idea about sema ceremony:

    http://www.video75.com/3xQgD-o0Q7Z/mevlana-festival-in-konyaturkey/

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

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    Sufizm

    by traveloturc Written Jul 20, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    sufis in practice

    Favorite thing: Sufism is a way of life in which a deeper identity is discovered and lived. This deeper identity, or essential Self, is beyond the already known personality and is in harmony with everything that exists. It has abilities of awareness, action, creativity, and love that are far beyond those of the superficial personality. Eventually it is understood that these abilities belong to a greater Being that we each individualize in our own unique way while never being separate from it.

    Fondest memory: The essential Self is an objective reality, but it cannot be known in a state of sleep, any more than the ordinary facts of reality can be known in a dream. In the Sufi tradition it is written that the absolute Spirit said And I breathed My Spirit into humanity. We are each enlivened by this in-breath. The essential Self, the soul, can be understood as this individualization of Spirit. The soul, however, is such a fine and subtle energy that it can be obscured by coarser energies of our existence, the energies of thought, desire, instinct, and sensation. These are the veils over the essential Self, the substances of intoxication that numb us to our essential Self.
    If your thought is a rose,
    you are a rose garden;
    if it is a thorn,
    you are fuel for the bath stove.
    Rumi, Mathnawi (Mesnevi), II, 278

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    • Religious Travel

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    Konya: Overview In...

    by yakacik Updated Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing:


    Konya: Overview


    In the guise of a modern city, set alone in the midst of fertile Anatolian steppelands about 220 kilometers southwest of Nevsehir, is Konya. This is one of the oldest and most conservative places in the whole of Turkey.

    Konya was first known and inhabited as 'Kuwanna' by the Hittites 4000 years ago, and has been an important provincial trading center since ever then. The Romans knew it as Iconium - a city in which the Apostle Paul once preached. In the 13th century it achieved political maturity as the capital of one of the selfgoverning states within the Seljuk empire, the Sultanate of Rum.

    The city's religious reputation, which has persisted to the present day (Konya is the stronghold of current religious political parties and administered by a fundamentalist mayor), was inspired during the sultanate. At that time it became home to one of the most famous of the Islamic 'Sufi' mystics, Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi (1207-1273), the founder of the Order of Whirling Dervishes, whose influence quickly spread throughout the entire Muslim world.

    Dervish worship consisted of a dance, the sema, which symbolized the unity of man and God. Disciples would whirl, accompanied by a music of the drum and ney (a reed flute) or sometimes a bigger orchestra with a choir. Ataturk banned the order in 1923 as part of his secular reforms, although every December a Dervish festival commemorating Rumi's death takes place. Officially, it is a 'cultural' and not a religious exercise.

    Rumi's presence still dominates the modern city. Built originally as a mausoleum by the Seljuks, the Mevlana Museum in the center of the town is also the site of his tomb. Secular or not, it remains a shrine in character. On the tomb itself, shrouded in thick green velvet, is an extract of Rumi's poetry:
    Come, Come! Whoever Whatever
    you may be, Come! Heathen, Fire
    Worshipper, Sinful of Idolatry,
    Come! Come even if you have
    broken your vows a hundred times -
    Ours is not the Door Of Misery and
    Despair, Come!

    At the entrance to the tomb is exhibited the oldest manuscript of Rumi's most famous work, the epic Mesnevi, and other collections of his lyric poetry.

    The sema itself was performed in the Semahane, an Ottoman structure to the north of the Green Dome. It now houses a fine collection of dervish paraphernalia ranging from music instruments to calligraphy. Across the street from the museum are the sprawling slum tenements and the market center of the city, which is worth strolling around.

    From the museum it is not far to the impressive 13th-century Alaettin Camii, and the Biiyiik Karatay Medresesi. The latter was finished in the middle of the thirteenth century and today houses a remarkable collection of ceramics and wall tiles from the Seljuk and Ottoman periods. Just as magnificent is the blueand-white marbled portal of the school.

    Close by is the Seljuk Ince Minare Dar'ul Hadis which features another extravagant door and houses the Museum of Seljuk Stone and Wood Carving. The most interesting displays are the figurative stone decorations and bas-reliefs taken from the Konya Castle, which include depictions of animals such as rhinoceros and elephants. Technically, at least, these break strict Islamic bans on the drawing of creatures possessed of souls as idolatry. On Ressam Sarni Sokak is the Archaeological Museum, which displays a Roman sarcophagus with an immaculate stucco frieze of the twelve labors of Hercules.

    Fifty kilometers to the south along the Silifke/Mersin road is fatal Hiiyiik which is said to be the site of the earliest human urban habitation on earth, dated back to around 7500 B.C. Not much remains for those who are not professional archaeologists. The road south continues through the flat plain, punctuated only by the town of Karaman (named after the Karamanid Turkish clan who were the last rivals of the Ottomans) and then plunges over the 1600 meter Sertavul Pass towards the town of Mut.

    Suddenly, there are trees again. Mut is a debarkation point for rafts along the Goksu River, which empties into the Mediterranean at Silifke. Those traveling by car might like to stop off at Alahan, a Byzantine monastery with a dramatic view over the southern slopes of the Taurus Mountains.

    Several westward options are also available from Konya. Beysehir and the lake of the same name lie about an hour by car over lower mountain passes. Nearly hidden by the muddy streets and general gloom of the contemporary town is the 13th-century Esrefpasa Cami, with elegant, carved wooden columns within and a splendid tile mirhab, which alone is worth a detour.

    South of the lake, a new highway leads to the Mediterranean coast through the forests of the Taurus Mountains. A curiosity along the way is the town of Huglu, where the entire population devotes its energy to the manufacture of quality shotguns.

    Turkish Lakes

    Another trunk road cuts north of Beysehir Lake through lovely farm and apple orchard country towards Isparta and Afyon, and into Turkey's lake region.

    Egridir is an old Seljuk city with the ruins of a grand mosque and bazaar located near the shore. A causeway in the middle of town heads to a small island where there are a number of pansiyons and small hotels.

    More a swamp than a lake is Ebir Golu, between the towns of Sultandagi, day and Bolvidin. Bird watchers in summer and hunters in winter make use of flat-bottomed boats that are similar to British punts to wend their way through the two-meter reeds of the bird and duck filled marsh.


    Overview





    Other Places in Central Anatolia
    Ankara
    Bogazkale
    Cappadocia
    Konya
    Konya: Overview


    In the guise of a modern city, set alone in the midst of fertile Anatolian steppelands about 220 kilometers southwest of Nevsehir, is Konya. This is one of the oldest and most conservative places in the whole of Turkey.

    Konya was first known and inhabited as 'Kuwanna' by the Hittites 4000 years ago, and has been an important provincial trading center since ever then. The Romans knew it as Iconium - a city in which the Apostle Paul once preached. In the 13th century it achieved political maturity as the capital of one of the selfgoverning states within the Seljuk empire, the Sultanate of Rum.

    The city's religious reputation, which has persisted to the present day (Konya is the stronghold of current religious political parties and administered by a fundamentalist mayor), was inspired during the sultanate. At that time it became home to one of the most famous of the Islamic 'Sufi' mystics, Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi (1207-1273), the founder of the Order of Whirling Dervishes, whose influence quickly spread throughout the entire Muslim world.

    Dervish worship consisted of a dance, the sema, which symbolized the unity of man and God. Disciples would whirl, accompanied by a music of the drum and ney (a reed flute) or sometimes a bigger orchestra with a choir. Ataturk banned the order in 1923 as part of his secular reforms, although every December a Dervish festival commemorating Rumi's death takes place. Officially, it is a 'cultural' and not a religious exercise.

    Rumi's presence still dominates the modern city. Built originally as a mausoleum by the Seljuks, the Mevlana Museum in the center of the town is also the site of his tomb. Secular or not, it remains a shrine in character. On the tomb itself, shrouded in thick green velvet, is an extract of Rumi's poetry:
    Come, Come! Whoever Whatever
    you may be, Come! Heathen, Fire
    Worshipper, Sinful of Idolatry,
    Come! Come even if you have
    broken your vows a hundred times -
    Ours is not the Door Of Misery and
    Despair, Come!

    At the entrance to the tomb is exhibited the oldest manuscript of Rumi's most famous work, the epic Mesnevi, and other collections of his lyric poetry.

    The sema itself was performed in the Semahane, an Ottoman structure to the north of the Green Dome. It now houses a fine collection of dervish paraphernalia ranging from music instruments to calligraphy. Across the street from the museum are the sprawling slum tenements and the market center of the city, which is worth strolling around.

    From the museum it is not far to the impressive 13th-century Alaettin Camii, and the Biiyiik Karatay Medresesi. The latter was finished in the middle of the thirteenth century and today houses a remarkable collection of ceramics and wall tiles from the Seljuk and Ottoman periods. Just as magnificent is the blueand-white marbled portal of the school.

    Close by is the Seljuk Ince Minare Dar'ul Hadis which features another extravagant door and houses the Museum of Seljuk Stone and Wood Carving. The most interesting displays are the figurative stone decorations and bas-reliefs taken from the Konya Castle, which include depictions of animals such as rhinoceros and elephants. Technically, at least, these break strict Islamic bans on the drawing of creatures possessed of souls as idolatry. On Ressam Sarni Sokak is the Archaeological Museum, which displays a Roman sarcophagus with an immaculate stucco frieze of the twelve labors of Hercules.

    Fifty kilometers to the south along the Silifke/Mersin road is fatal Hiiyiik which is said to be the site of the earliest human urban habitation on earth, dated back to around 7500 B.C. Not much remains for those who are not professional archaeologists. The road south continues through the flat plain, punctuated only by the town of Karaman (named after the Karamanid Turkish clan who were the last rivals of the Ottomans) and then plunges over the 1600 meter Sertavul Pass towards the town of Mut.

    Suddenly, there are trees again. Mut is a debarkation point for rafts along the Goksu River, which empties into the Mediterranean at Silifke. Those traveling by car might like to stop off at Alahan, a Byzantine monastery with a dramatic view over the southern slopes of the Taurus Mountains.

    Several westward options are also available from Konya. Beysehir and the lake of the same name lie about an hour by car over lower mountain passes. Nearly hidden by the muddy streets and general gloom of the contemporary town is the 13th-century Esrefpasa Cami, with elegant, carved wooden columns within and a splendid tile mirhab, which alone is worth a detour.

    South of the lake, a new highway leads to the Mediterranean coast through the forests of the Taurus Mountains. A curiosity along the way is the town of Huglu, where the entire population devotes its energy to the manufacture of quality shotguns.

    Turkish Lakes

    Another trunk road cuts north of Beysehir Lake through lovely farm and apple orchard country towards Isparta and Afyon, and into Turkey's lake region.

    Egridir is an old Seljuk city with the ruins of a grand mosque and bazaar located near the shore. A causeway in the middle of town heads to a small island where there are a number of pansiyons and small hotels.

    More a swamp than a lake is Ebir Golu, between the towns of Sultandagi, day and Bolvidin. Bird watchers in summer and hunters in winter make use of flat-bottomed boats that are similar to British punts to wend their way through the two-meter reeds of the bird and duck filled marsh.


    Overview





    Other Places in Central Anatolia
    Ankara
    Bogazkale

    Cappadocia
    Konya






    Thanks to TravelWizard.Com Travel And Cruise Consultants: Konya Vacations

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  • yakacik's Profile Photo

    Reason is powerless ...

    by yakacik Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing:

    Reason is powerless
    in the expression of Love. Love alone is capable of
    revealing the truth of Love and being a Lover. The
    way of our prophets is the way of Truth. If you want
    to live, die in Love; die in Love if you want to remain
    alive.
    Mevlana Jelalu'ddin
    Rumi
    The name Mevlana Jalaluddin Rumi stands
    for Love and ecstatic flight into the infinite. Mevlana is
    one of the great spiritual masters and poetical geniuses of
    mankind and was the founder of the Mevlevi Sufi order, a leading
    mystical brotherhood of Islam.
    Rumi was born in Balkh (Afghanistan)
    in 1207 to a family of learned Persian theologians. Escaping
    the Mongol invasion, Rumi and his family traveled extensively
    in the Muslim lands, performed the pilgrimage to Mecca and
    finally settled in Konya, Anatolia (Turkey), where he succeeded
    his father in 1231 as professor in religious sciences.
    He was introduced into the mystical
    path by a wandering dervish, Shamsuddin of Tabriz. His love
    and his bereavement for the death of Shams found their expression
    in a surge of music, dance and lyric poems, 'Diva i
    Samsi Tabrizzi'. Rumi is the author of six volume huge
    didactic work, the 'Mathn wi',
    and discourses, 'Fihi
    ma Fihi', written to introduce his disciples to metaphysics.

    If there is any general idea underlying
    Rumi's poetry, it is the absolute love of God. His influence
    on thought, literature and all forms of aesthetic expression
    in the world of Islam cannot be overrated.
    Mevlana Jalaluddin Rumi died on December
    17, 1273. Men of five faiths followed his bier. That night
    was named Sebul Arus (Night of Union). Ever since, the Mevlevi
    dervishes have kept that date as a festival.
    For more about Life of Mevlana Jalaluddin Rumi
    Whirling Dervishes Links

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  • Arkeolog's Profile Photo

    The most famous building here ...

    by Arkeolog Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The most famous building here is the Green Mausoleum of Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi, the great Turkish philosopher and poet. He is the founder of the sect of Whirling Dervishes, the seminary that was attached to the mausoleum. It has been converted into a museum housing Mevlana's works, and accoutrements related to his sect. Every year in December, ceremonies are held in Konya or the commemoration of Mevlana and the Whirling Dervishes. In this Dervish Festival, the 'Sema' dance is performed by men dressed in white robes, whirling and rotating around the floor. This dance, in which the dancer with the great love of God is believed to attain divine unity, is an event well worth seeing.

    Fondest memory: Konya Mevlevi Convent
    The orginal building was constructed in 1274 by the Selçuks, and was expanded and restored later by the Ottomand. Is consists of a cortyard with fountain, a room for chanting the Quoran, a mausoleum, meting room, a mosque, rooms for the dervishes, a kitchen, classroom and a hall for veligious ceremonies. In the cortyard there exist the tombs of Sinan Pasha, Fatma Hatun, Hürrem Pasha and Mehmet Bey. It was converted into a museum in 1927.

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    Quick Bread with Ground...

    by Arkeolog Written Aug 24, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Quick Bread with Ground Meat----ETLI EKMEK

    The recipe is from Kastamonu province. This, from of quick bread is, fýlled with spinach or edible wild greens in Konya; with fýlling of boiled potatoes, purslane or çökelek in Içel provinces. In Eskiþehir it is deep fried and called 'Raw Börek' since ground meat is not browned or sautied for the fýlling.

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Best place to see and understad Whirling Dervishes

    by traveloturc Written Nov 25, 2012
    Derwishes

    Favorite thing: Mevlana and Sems
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumi
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shams_Tabrizi
    http://www.mevlana.com/
    http://www.konya.bel.tr/sayfadetay.php?sayfaID=289
    http://www.semazen.net/eng/index.php
    http://www.rumi.org.uk/
    The way of reaching God from their hearts, dances and poems.

    Come, come, whoever you are,
    Wanderer, worshipper, lover of leaving,
    Ours is not a caravan of despair.
    Even if you have broken your vows a thousand times
    It doesn’t matter
    Come, come yet again, come”
    (Mevlana Celaleddin Rumi )

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  • GIPA's Profile Photo

    MEVLANA

    by GIPA Updated Jun 8, 2014

    Favorite thing: Visiting Mevlana Museum , and learn about the Sufi master RUMI was a very remarkable and unforgettable experience. I could lave spent hours inside Mevlana museum where the sufi leaders are buried and a very magnific exposition is displayed.

    Fondest memory: Allaedin hills is a relaxing square that worths a visit . There is a mosque on the top , and lots of gardens and cafes around.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • cbeaujean's Profile Photo

    mevlana tekke and selimiye camii

    by cbeaujean Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    selimiye ��amii

    Favorite thing: on the right,the green ceramic corded tower of mevlana tekke.
    old dervish order convent;today,officially islamic art museum

    Fondest memory: but,really a pilgrimage place...

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    • Historical Travel
    • Adventure Travel
    • Architecture

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    islamic art museum and pilgrimage place

    by cbeaujean Written Feb 25, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    museum?

    Favorite thing: a lot of pilgrims visit the museum

    Fondest memory: praying and staying in deep meditation in front of djalal-al-din rumi's cenotaph,dervishes founder,ottoman poet and philosopher.

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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