Konya Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by June.b
  • Local Customs
    by June.b
  • Local Customs
    by June.b

Most Recent Local Customs in Konya

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    Taking photographs

    by June.b Updated Jul 14, 2011
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    Be careful in taking photographs of the surrounding of Konya especially the local neighborhood where there are people around. Ask the people first if you're taking their photos as they sometimes get offended and it somehow is a sign of discourtesy.

    Don't just shoot people on the streets, Konya - although already a metropolitan city - is still conservative than most cities in Turkey.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Hadja Nasreddin

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 20, 2009

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    Hadja Nasreddin at Aksehir
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    We passed by Aksehir on our way from Konya to Pamukkale. After having lunch in a restaurant I saw a monument to Nasreddin and I took photos which you can see here.

    Nasreddin (in Turkish "Nasreddin Hoca") was a legendary satirical sufi figure who lived during the Middle Ages (around 13th century), in Aksehir, and later in Konya, under the Seljuq rule. He was a populist philosopher and wise man, remembered for his funny stories and anecdotes.

    Nasreddin lived in Anatolia. He was born in Hortu Village in Sivrihisar, Eskiehir in the 13th century, then settled in Aksehir, and later in Konya, where he died.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    "Konyalým"- Turkish folk song

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 20, 2009

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    Konya - Bazaar
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    One of the best known Turkish folk songs is named "Konyalým" (making reference to a loved one from Konya). The song's slightly suggestive lyrics are known virtually by everybody in Turkey.

    You can listen to this beautiful song while watching my 2 min 17 sec Video clip Konya with music by Hatice – Konyalim.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    “Sema” - whirling dervishes dance

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jan 20, 2009

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    ���Sema��� - whirling dervishes dance
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    Rumi is also well known for the Sufi brotherhood he established with its distinctive whirling and circling dance, known as Sema and practiced by the Dervishes.

    With arms held high, the right hand lifted upward to receive blessings and energy from heaven, the left hand turned downward to bestow these blessing on the earth, and the body spinning from right to left, the dervish revolves around the heart and embraces all of creation with love.
    The dervishes form a circle, each turning in harmony with the rhythm of the accompanying music as the circle itself moves around, slowly picking up speed and intensity until all collapse in a sort of spiritual exaltation.

    You may watch my 2 min 23 sec VIDEO-Clip Whirling Dervishes with Traditional Turkish folk music.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Friendly Turkish dog

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Nov 30, 2008

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    You can imagine how I was missing my dogs staying in Moscow! So every dog I saw in Turkey reminded me my German shepherds which were waiting for me in Moscow. This dog at Caravansary seemed to be extremely friendly to all tourists who crowded near the bus…

    I know two Turkish breeds.
    The Sivas Kangal Dog is a breed of domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris), and is the national breed of Turkey. This dog, which can grow as large as 64 kg, was originally used as a Livestock guardian dog.
    Have a look here Kangal Dog.
    The Anatolian Shepherd Dog is a breed of dog from Anatolia and bred for guarding flocks of sheep from wolves, bears, jackals, and even cheetahs.
    Have a look there Anatolian Shepherd .

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    Spoon Dance of Konya

    by traveloturc Updated Nov 21, 2008

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    konya spoon dance

    Konya is famous with the folkloric Spoon Dance ...consists of male and female dancers clicking out the dance rhythm with a pair of wooden spoons in each hand.
    They use to dance according to the rhytm and you can enjoy how they are masters to build rythym only with two wooden spoon ...
    Spoon-making still continues in some regions of Anatolia. In Konya in particular, spoons have been made since Seljuk times. Boxwood, oak and pear are the most generally used woods. The spoons are shaped with the help of small adze or rasp, and are still made in the Akseki, Gediz and Tarakli regions. Today, as well as spoons for the kitchen, there are also spoons in folk dances. Spoons are cleaned with emery paper, decorated with various designs and figures or writing, and then colored before being sold.
    If you can have the chances to find some performers in Konya dont miss it ..Its really interesting..
    you can also find the examples in you tube in the name of
    "Konya kasik "

    you can also watch this video to have an idea about :

    spoon dance from Konya

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  • mikelisaanna's Profile Photo

    Konya is a religious city

    by mikelisaanna Written Sep 9, 2008

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    Women in Konya

    Konya is one of the more religious and conservative large cities in Turkey. As a result, you will see most Turkish women in Konya wearing headscarves and covering their arms and legs. We had no problems - we just dressed a little more conservatively while we were in Konya, with our knees and shoulders covered. You will be expected to dress appropriately (headscarves for women, knees and shoulders covered for both sexes) if you enter the Mevlana museum or any of the historic mosques in Konya.

    You also won't see as much drinking of alcoholic beverages while you are in Konya. You can get a beer in hotel bars and some restaurants, but Konya is certainly not the city that you would take a road trip to if you want to really party.

    Although they are more conservative, we found the people of Konya to be friendly, and we enjoyed our visit to the city.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Women's Travel
    • Family Travel

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    Etli Ekmek ( bread with meat)

    by traveloturc Written Jul 20, 2006

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    bread with meat

    60 or 70 years ago in the market field of Konya there were a few of restaurant and lots of kebab makers. These kebab makers were coming together the place that we call today “kebapçýlar içi” (kebab makers’ place). People working in bazaar were eating some kinds of special kebabs from kebab makers instead of restaurants. Because they knew that they could eat what restaurants were cooking at their own homes.
    Nowadays people often see fast food restaurants where some kind of meatballs can be found however residents of Konya knew etliekmek (a kind of Turkish fast food made from meat and bread cooked in old ovens) for hundreds years.
    Etliekmek was being prepared in kebab markets. Inside fillings and dough were prepared in market and they were shaped by cook and then cooked in suitable places in market.

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    Most religious?

    by Bregman Updated Feb 26, 2005

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    Konya is probably the most religious city in Turkey. As you can see here I was asked to wear this cloth on top of my shorts. While it is quite standard in other mosques for women wearing shorts, it is quite unusual for men. Anyway, it was quite a small price to pay.

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    If you go inside a mosque you...

    by silvia-m.b Written Aug 25, 2002

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    If you go inside a mosque you have to take off your shoes. At the entrance of each one there are places to leave your shoes or plastic bags to take them with you. The worst is smell...stink everywhere!!!

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    Faithful Moslems will remove...

    by SueRivet Written Aug 25, 2002

    Faithful Moslems will remove their shoes and socks, then wash their feet in the tub before entering the building containing Rumi's remains. If you are not Moslem, you must remove foot coverings, but needn't perform any ablutions.

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Konya Local Customs

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