Bodrum Local Customs

  • My Siberian Husky Dogs, Bodrum, TR
    My Siberian Husky Dogs, Bodrum, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • Fresh Seafood, Bodrum, TR
    Fresh Seafood, Bodrum, TR
    by TrendsetterME
  • My Siberian Husky Dogs, Bodrum, TR
    My Siberian Husky Dogs, Bodrum, TR
    by TrendsetterME

Most Recent Local Customs in Bodrum

  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Fresh Seafood, Bodrum, TR ...

    by TrendsetterME Written Apr 4, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fresh Seafood, Bodrum, TR
    4 more images

    Lots of seafood, fresh fish, squids, shrimps and the famous meze's ...

    Thats what u have to taste for sure as u r in Bodrum peninsula ...

    Turkish meze often consist of beyaz peynir (literally "white cheese"), kavun (sliced ripe melon), acılı ezme (hot pepper paste often with walnuts), haydari (thick strained yoghurt like the Levantine labne), patlıcan salatası (cold aubergine salad), kalamar (calamari or squid), enginar (artichokes), cacık (yoghurt with cucumber and garlic), pilaki (various foods cooked in a special sauce), dolma or sarma (rice-stuffed vine leaves or other stuffed vegetables, such as bell peppers).

    The seafood is always fresh as its consumed on regular basis, sothat each day fishermen angle fresh to the table for the tourists and for the local citizens ...

    A "must try" tip for Bodrum for yummy tastes ... :)

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Food and Dining
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Lyndra's Profile Photo

    Shopkeepers Methods:Intense Experience!

    by Lyndra Written Jun 28, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Something that any newcomer to Turkey willhave to get ysed to very quickly is the methods used by shopkeepers, bar servers and restaurant waiting staff to convince you to come to their establishment.
    It is common for the staff to be standing outside trying to entice you in with flattering comments, charm offensive and occassionally in your face tactics that can be quite unnerving to the tourist. It can be overwhelming and in busy parts of Bodrum, incessant.
    Some of these people are only paid if they get people into these businesses but do not let this pressure you - if you want to read a menu, do and then either go in because you like what's on offer. If the staff are bothering you then be polite and firm in your insistence that you are only looking and actually intend to eat/drink/shop elsewhere. Often if you tell them you will try them later in the holiday this is enough to get them focussing on another customer. Try not to lose your temper :-)

    Was this review helpful?

  • Lyndra's Profile Photo

    The Nazar Boncuk

    by Lyndra Written Jun 28, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The boncuk is a blue ornate glass symbol that is alleged to protect the wearer from the "evil eye" and while the Turks are not as superstitious as in days of old, the tradition to display and wear these glass jewels is still as strong as ever. You cannot go into a shop, bar or restaurant in the peninsula without seeing one displayed to pretect the premises - but Bodrum does a roaring trade in selling them to tourists. They come in all sizes from miniscule wallet size varieties up to large plate size for displaying in houses, they come as plates, dishes, cups, art work for walls, pens, necklaces and bracelets...they are a must have memory of your time in this part of the world.
    Legend has it that the boncuk will trap the evil eye should it be in the vicinity - when you buy the nazar boncuk if it ever cracks or breaks then it has done what it was designed for and caught the evil before it gets to you!!! Turkish mothers are said to put one on their babies when they are born to prevent any bad luck but in shops in the resort you may find yourself offered one by a shop keeper, accept it graciously!

    Was this review helpful?

  • Lyndra's Profile Photo

    Haggle!!

    by Lyndra Written May 16, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The art of shopping in Turkey involves haggling. It is briliant fun because if you come from Western Europe it is something we don't get to try! If you find something you want try not to be too enthusiastic about it - it will be harder to get the deal if they know you really want it. Offer half the asking price and never go higher than you are willing to pay (the shopkeeper will never sell at a loss so you will both win and have great fun doing it). Turkish shop keepers are charming and will try anything to convince you to buy. Don't be offended by their forward attitude - they do this to be friendly more than intimidating. If you say no thankyou there will be no offense taken and you will have had a nice chat.
    Remember that a deal is sealed when you shake on it - it would be very rude to retract the offer once you have agreed the deal :-)

    Was this review helpful?

  • Lyndra's Profile Photo

    Giving Tips

    by Lyndra Written May 3, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Many turkish bar staff earn minimal wage which can be very low indeed - for this they are expected to work punishing hours and still be nice to us the tourist. The tips we give them are so important in adding money to their small pay packets. Unfortunately the English have a reputation for being a bit stingy with the money! Round up the drinks order and let them keep what is actually a really smal sum to us but they are so grateful for these kindnesses.

    Was this review helpful?

  • andrea.d's Profile Photo

    About Turkish people

    by andrea.d Updated Jul 22, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    the shop

    I would say that local custom in Turkey is that all the Turkish people are extremely polite, nice and very helpful when it comes to tourists. For example, near our hotel there was one small shop (on the pic) where you could buy newspapers, and the owners were so nice and always with a smile on their faces! It’s just something that you don’t see every day!

    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • andrea.d's Profile Photo

    Tukish tea

    by andrea.d Written Sep 10, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tea

    Tea is national drink of Turkish people. They drink tea daily in their lives both in breakfast and in evening. Turkish people are famous in hospitality and enjoy to serve tea to their guests. About 160.000 tons of black tea are consumed in Turkey every year.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Theme Park Trips

    Was this review helpful?

  • Fen's Profile Photo

    The Boncuk / Evil Eye Amulet.

    by Fen Written Sep 10, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Evil Eye

    This amulet against evil eye is very typical in Turkey. You can find it all over Turkey and women use it as a bracelet, earrings or necklace. Turkish people use it hanged in their house, office and also in their car, also babies have it hanged in their cloths. It should be mainly blue and look like an eye. There are very different sizes but the shape is usually round. The Turkish name for this amulet that protects one from the evil eye is nazar boncuk.

    This one is the most original turkish evil eye amulet and can be hanged at your house, office, car or anywhere else you want to protect from bad energy !

    Was this review helpful?

  • Fen's Profile Photo

    Turkish coffee

    by Fen Written Sep 10, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Turkish coffee

    Turkish coffee is tradionally prepared in a small copper pot called Cezve. Heat together at the same time coffee powder, water and sugar on a low flame. When the liquid boils, then serve the 'Kahve' in small mocca cups. There are three types to order : 'sade' (without sugar), 'orta' (the Turkish word for medium, in this case little sugar) and 'sekerli' (for sweet). By the way - perhaps you will find someone here or around Bodrum, who will read your future from the coffee grounds. This is a very popular here in Turkey

    Was this review helpful?

  • andrea.d's Profile Photo

    Evil eye

    by andrea.d Written Sep 4, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    evil eye

    Nazar Bonjuk is a Turkish good-luck "evil eye" charm.
    The Nazar Bonjuk was born of the age-old "evil eye" superstition that one person can cast a spell on another. To prevent this, form millennia Anatolian artisans have created blue glass "eyes" that "look" straight back at the spell-caster as if to say "I see what you're doing, and you can't get away with it!"
    Nazar Bonjuk evil eye charms are hand-crafted of blown glass in Turkey, and appear in many shapes and sizes.

    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • andrea.d's Profile Photo

    Turkish coffee

    by andrea.d Written Sep 4, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    While in Turkey you must try Turkish coffee! It is made of a roasted and the minced coffee beans. The taste of turkish coffee is really strong!
    Now, here are the instructions for making a perfect cup of turkish coffee:
    1. For every cup of coffee you require, pour an equal amount of cold water into a cold ibrik (ibrik is that small pot on the pic in which you make the coffee).
    2. For every cup required, add two coffee spoons of our Turkish coffee.
    3. Most people prefer Turkish coffee with sugar, although it can be drunk without (sade). Add two coffee spoons of sugar to the ibrik for every cup required to make a medium sweet brew. Adjust to suit your individual taste.
    4. Mix the water, sugar and coffee in the ibrik once with the coffee spoon.
    5. Place the ibrik onto the top of a stove and cook on the lowest possible flame.
    6. As the mixture begins to simmer, the surface of the mixture will begin to foam up. As it appears, pour it (the foam, and only the foam) in equal measures into each cup.
    7. Continue the above instruction until all the mixture has gone (2 boils should be enough).
    8. The coffee should be allowed to settle for a minute or two before drinking to allow the sediments to settle.
    9. Turkish coffee is traditionally accompanied with a glass of cold water.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Theme Park Trips

    Was this review helpful?

  • Erkmen's Profile Photo

    Health and Hospitals

    by Erkmen Written Mar 26, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For many people Health services in their desired travel location is very important..

    So how is health services in Bodrum..

    Bodrum now has 3 Hospitals. All have the most modern equipment and are very well maintained. For emergency all hospitals have a 24 h service

    Private Hospital Bodrum (Ozel Hastanesi)
    Mars Mabedi Caddesi, ýesmebasi Mevkii No.22-43:
    Tel: (0252) 313 6566, Fax: (0252) 313 1298
    Universal-Hospital Bodrum, Konacik-Bodrum
    (0252) 317 1515, Fax: (0252) 317 1516
    State Hospital: (Devlet Hastanesi)
    Tel: (0252) 313 1420 - 1432 (13 Lines)

    Was this review helpful?

  • Erkmen's Profile Photo

    Market days of Bodrum

    by Erkmen Written Mar 26, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Clothes Market

    In all cities in Turkiye there are local markets, that set their tents and represents colorful clothes, Vegetables and fresh fruits..

    For many tourists, these markets can be a good opportunity to make shopping..

    And here is a list of Local market days around Bodrum peninsula..

    Mondays : Güvercinlik
    Tuesdays : Bodrum (fabrics and clothing)
    Wednesdays : Gümüslük and Ortakent
    Thursdays : Bodrum (food) and Yalikavak
    Fridays : Bodrum (food) and Bitez
    Saturdays : Turgutreis (food and clothing)
    Sundays : Mumcular and Gumbet

    There is a flea market every first sunday of the month in Bitez

    Was this review helpful?

  • voyageur2's Profile Photo

    Olive....Elixir of The Gods

    by voyageur2 Updated May 30, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Winter is the season for olive harvest.

    Everybody going to Bodrum by land can see numerous olive trees. Region is well known with quality of its olives. Locals never prepare a table without olive oil. Salads and many dishes contain it. Here are a few examples:
    mixed fries(pepper, tomato, egg plant, marrows etc.) with yoghurt, omelettes with local vegetables and herbs, green or black olive in olive oil(try it with some toast-excellent for a breakfast)

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Food and Dining
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • jonturk's Profile Photo

    Celebration

    by jonturk Written Jan 8, 2003

    Turgutreis Commemoration Celebrations 23 June / Bodrum
    Organizer : Turgutreis Municipality
    TEL: 382 20 35
    FAX: 382 30 19 382 34 39

    International Bodrum Cup Sailing Boat Races 1 -31 October / Bodrum

    Organizer : Bodrum Era Sailing Club
    TEL: 316 53 38
    FAX: 316 23 10 - 316 20 54

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Bodrum

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

112 travelers online now

Comments

Bodrum Local Customs

Reviews and photos of Bodrum local customs posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Bodrum sightseeing.

View all Bodrum hotels