Fun things to do in Nevsehir Ili

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Nevsehir Ili

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    Goreme

    by solopes Updated Dec 31, 2013

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    Goreme is the most attractive place in Nevsehir province.

    The churches and tunnels are not to be missed for any reason.

    Uchisar and Zelve are alse remarkable places in this area that, once seen, cannot be forgotten.

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    Camel Rock

    by solopes Updated Sep 25, 2012

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    No doubt, this rock is in Nevsehir Ili, but I don't remember the exact location. But if you follow the usual itineraries you will surely pass close to it.

    It is a curiosity impossible to be missed, considering its shape, size, and location by a main road.

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    Zelve

    by solopes Updated Sep 25, 2012

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    The erosion has long taken most of the soft lava, leaving behind high formations, sometimes isolated, and used by men in all its highness.

    It's a strange sensation, in Zelve, climbing in a carved house to visit its three and even four floors.

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    Uchisar

    by solopes Updated May 16, 2012

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    The city of Uchisar is the place of Capadoccia where life seems more intense, in perfect harmony with the natural formations, and taking good profit of them, enhancing their preservation for tourist admiration.

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    Mustafapasa - "Sleeping Beauty of Cappadocia"

    by nicolaitan Updated Sep 16, 2011

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    The small peaceful village of Mustafapasa several miles south of Urgup has been a protected site since 1981 with approximately 100 stone houses awaiting restoration. Since the 2-3 C, rock cut houses surrounded the large yellow rock at the town center, but in the 19th C the village became a favorite for vacation residences of wealthy Greek businessmen. Turks and Greeks lived together here till the forced removal of the Greek contingent in the mid-1920s, but their tufa-stone mansions made of cut blocks remain. Mustafapasa lies in a fertile valley and is a center of Cappadocian wine production, sold entirely to local hotels and restaurants, as well as producing apricots pears and apples. Grape syrup is a famed product, made until recently in the traditional way by barefooted women. The valleys surrounding the town contain many rock cut churches less visited than most because of their isolation.

    There is no well marked path or road to the summit allowing overview images of Mustafapasa. One just drives up the hill on dirt roads through the town, ever aiming upward. The photographs were exposed in front of a somewhat dilapidated garage, no other tourists.

    MERZIFONLU KARA MUSTAFA PASA -- a 17th C Ottoman military leader and grand vizier who led Turkey's last attempt to conquer Central Europe. Most accounts suggest that he was a villanous sort, but he rose rapidly in the ranks and commanded the forces which expanded the Ottoman Empire into Poland and Ukraine. In 1683, his army of 100000 besieged Vienna with its force of 10000 Habsburg troops and within two months controlled a portion of the city. However, he would be defeated in the Battle of Vienna in Sept 1683 by a united army led by Polish king Jan Sobieski ( whose name appears coincidentally on the vodka I use for my martinis, some of which resides in my freezer as I type ).
    For this devastating loss, Mustafa Pasa was executed on Christmas Day 1683 ( this commentary is being written on Christmas Day exactly 325 years later ), strangled by a silk cord and with his head delivered in a silk bag to the reigning Sultan Mehmed IV in the traditional Ottoman manner for high ranking persons. His last words apparently were to the executioner, suggesting that the knot be correctly tied.

    We have Mustafa Pasa to thank for our coffee addiction - his fleeing army abandoned large amounts of unroasted coffee beans, the beginning of the Viennese coffee business.

    Of course, the village is really named after the given name of Ataturk, who created our modern Turkey, but Merzifonlu is really a pretty interesting character and worth the diversion.l

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    Rose Valley

    by SurfaceTravel Written Feb 4, 2010

    This two hour walk was another major highlight of the trip. The rock formations there are fantastic, and you can see the remains of major building structures carved out. There are also many "pigeon houses", square holes carved into the cliffs for pigeons to roost. The people would climb up via internal tunnels carved through the cliffs to harvest pigeon dung to sell as fertiliser.

    We had also walked up the Ihlara Valley which was also nice, but nowhere near as unique as the Rose Valley. The walking isn't too difficult; decent walking shoes, sun protection, and a bottle of water are sufficient kit to have.

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    Göreme Open Air Museum

    by SurfaceTravel Written Feb 4, 2010

    The Göreme Open Air Museum is a member of Unesco World Heritage List and well worth a visit. It's a cluster of Christian churces carved into the weird rock formations. I recommend hiring a guide to explain all about the history of the Christians hiding here during the 10th through 12th centuries. There are many amazing photo opportunities.

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    Ballooning

    by SurfaceTravel Written Feb 4, 2010

    We went hot-air ballooning and watched the sunrise from the air. This is probably the highlight activity of any trip we have ever done. It was amazing! A van picked us up at the hotel at about 5:30 AM and took us out to the field. It was still a bit dark and it was cold. There were about 15 balloons within sight all getting inflated and ready. They gave us tea, coffee, juice and muffins on a wooden table. Then they fit 28 people into one balloon. The basket is divided into four corner compartments and one small central one for the pilot. Fortunately we were last on so we had an outer corner. There was a convenient little hand-grab hole in the wicker about a foot up so Emily could stick her foot in that and stand up high enough to lean over the edge of the basket comfortably. It seemed to take a long long time for the pilot to generate enough heat to lift us off. Everyone was muttering that there were too many of us; we were too heavy. And then suddenly, with no jar or warning, we were airborne.

    It was amazing how fast and how high we climbed. We felt absolutely no movement. You look over the edge and suddenly realise how high up you are. We saw maybe 30 to 40 other balloons up that morning. The pilots took these balloons way up high, down low through crevices and valleys so that we were looking up to their top edges, sometimes coming so close to peaks that it seemed as if we could reach out and touch them. Often we would be directly over top or underneath another balloon. We would go one way, go up a few hundred feet, and then go back the way we came! It's like the pilot was driving it with a steering wheel. We flew over the Rose Valley that we would later walk. Eventually landed, rising up from a valley to its edge on top. There were about eight men on the ground to catch us. When we got low enough, the pilot threw over lines that they caught, and together they landed the balloon directly onto the trailer. We've never flown a balloon before, so we cannot compare, but there were some Australians on board who had flown in the Serengeti and in Australia. They claimed that this ride was by far the best they had been on, hands-down.

    The truck pulled the trailer over, with all of us still in the basket and the balloon still above us inflated, to a larger field where they could lower the balloon. Then we collected our certificates, they gave us champagne, and we gathered for our group photo. The van took us back to our hotel.

    Tips: dress warm and try to get in the basket first or last to be sure of a spot at the edge.

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    Kaymakli Underground City

    by DSwede Updated Nov 1, 2009

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    Dating back to equal periods of the other landmarks in the area, the Kaymakli Underground City is nearly 2000 years old. These labyrinths were complete functional cities, with cellars, residences, stables, graineries, queries and everything in between.

    As invasions of armies and enemies became more frequent, the locals sought refuge the only place they could, in the ground. With only a few relatively hidden entries, the maze of rooms are all interconnected to each other, centered around the vertical ventilation shafts.

    Today, only the first four levels are cleared for visitation.

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    Hot air ballooning, hiking among the valleys...

    by revontulet Updated Mar 21, 2009

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    For me, every single person who visits Cappadocia should take a tour with hot air ballooning over the breathtaking valleys. I strongly advice "Sultans Balloon" for you, They're very professional and very helpful. You'll get your "flight certificate" while you're drinking your champagne after the flight;=))

    The other thing is, hiking among the valleys where you can find very different shape of the rocks... I really enjoyed while some VT'ers (OH_DK, Cassacherio, paragiana75) were hiking in the Baglidere Valley, You'll love it the "Love Valley" :)) and if you visit in Fall, don't forget to eat grapes in the valley...There are lots of valleys that you can walk easily. Kizilcukur valley, Guvercinlik (Pigeon) Valley, Zemni Valley, Kiliclar (Swords) Valley are some of them...

    You can also ride a horse through the valleys...

    You can make pottery in Cavusin or Avanos...

    You can taste the regional vines in "Turasan vine tasting factory" or "Kocabag"...

    I advise to visit both Goreme (1 km from the city center) and Zelve Open Air Museum (4 km from the city center)... but if you don't have time I recommend you to prefer Zelve Open Air Museum. It's beyond the crowded and you can lost in the history without bothering;) (entrance is 10.-TL for Zelve for 2008)

    Don't forget to watch sunset in Goreme while you're drinking your vine...

    Sinasos or Mustafapasa (latter is formal name of the town) must be visited, it is located 5 km south of Urgup and once it was a Greek village that's why you can see several old greek houses (one of them is very famous since it was used as a platform for a TV serials-"Asmali Konak"). Sinasos is also famous for its carpets...

    In Sinasos, visit the "Hidden Valley" (aka Balta's place) for some cold drinks... it's a nice cave-cafe with an old Greek church...

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    Goreme Open Air Museum

    by revontulet Written Mar 21, 2009

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    Goreme Open Air Museum is located 1 km from the center of Goreme. It's easy to reach there, you can take a taxi or the best way is walking and breathing the atmosphere of Fairy Chimneys:))

    It's an open air museum and there are many churces which dates back to the time at begining of Christianism.

    15 TL (aprox.7 -8 Eur) for the entrance fee.(Summer 2008)

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    Pasabag fairy chimneys

    by mindcrime Updated Jan 28, 2009

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    Oh, these mushroom shaped fairy chimneys are amazing! I couldn’t stop taking pictures of them and walking upside down the small paths to see as many as I could. It was like walking among a village from wonderland! There a lot of vineyards around and the name in Turkish means the vineyards of the Pacha (some kind of a general in Ottoman empire).

    I just spend some time looking at the weird tuff cones. Some of them have smaller cones on the upper level and these double (sometimes triple!) reminded me of the smurf houses! :)
    The truth is that they were used by hermits, one famous one is St. Simeon. There is a chapel dedicated to him. He had a good reputation of a man that makes miracles so after a while he decided to hide away in one of these high tuff cones like many others hermits of that era(5th century)

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    Zelve Open Air Museum

    by nicolaitan Written Dec 28, 2008

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    The Zelve Museum is comprised of three adjoining valleys set in a rugged landscape with steep cliffs, large rock formations with pinnacles, and rough edges throughout. It is one of the oldest cave cities in Cappadocia and the site of the first seminaries in the region. The Direkli Church (church with columns) goes back to the earliest times of Christian occupancy when the extensive tunnel and cave network offered safety from Roman soldiers. As elsewhere, the zenith for this town was between the 9 and 13 C, but Zelve remained occupied continuously until 1952 when fatal landslides finally led to forced removal of the residents. Interestingly, Christians and Moslems lived side by side in this village until it was closed up.

    The museum area suffers ongoing landslides - one several days before our visit - limiting access in the hilly terrain to some of the most famous churches as well as a rock cut mosque. Only the Direkli church can be easily reached. Understandably, tourism here has decreased considerably. On our visit, we had the entire place to ourselves. Nonetheless, Zelve remains a worthwhile visit for the rugged scenery and for those willing, a good hiking experience. Of particular note are the bathrooms on the far side of the souvenir stands - clean and modern.

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    Kaymakli Underground City

    by nicolaitan Updated Dec 27, 2008

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    Large underground cities were part and parcel of life in Cappadocia, used in times of peace as stables and storage facilities and in times of religious persecution or war as refuge. As early as the 2nd Millenium BC, Hittites used caves for storage and stables with the first level of the Kaymakli city clearly identified as a Hittite stable. Even today, local residents can use these first level rooms as basements. There are known to be 30 or even more of these cities in Cappadocia with 8 available to tourists in part. At this site known to be eight levels down, four are in active use. At Kaymakli, a path has been laid out with arrows and plenty of lights to guide visitors. There is one long tunnel which must be traversed bent over ( watch your head - that's rock above you ), but for the most part the tour is fairly easy. Of course, it is a long way up from level four but with several resting spots along the way.

    Kaymakli is estimated to have housed up to 5000 people on multiple levels. Small chambers presumably family quarters can be found on most levels. The second houses a church and a cemetery as well as several huge round stones used to block the entranceways from predators. Typically rolled into place on their sides, the rocks were wider than the tunnels and therefore could not be dislodged. The third and fourth levels appear to have been storage areas for food and wine, kitchens, and dining areas. Vertical shafts up to 120 feet long were used for ventilation with all the rooms arranged around these central structures. The shafts were sunk to water access level, but closed at the top to prevent contamination or poisoning. It is estimated that survival here was up to three months.

    The inhabitants thought of everything - small holes connected the levels allowing for communication without having to actually walk between levels. Dead end corriders were used to trap intruders and in the event of catastrophe secret exit tunnels were available. Many experts believe the cities were connected by underground tunnels extending for miles. Wine presses typically drained down one level to stone tanks.

    From the parking lot a block away, there is a gauntlet of tacky souvenir stands. Several restaurants border the lot. A relatively clean public bathroom is available near the entrance. As for the entrance, it reminded us of nothing more than a typical NY subway station, complete with cement steps with a central railing.

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    ROADSIDE WONDERS - THE SPUR TO SOGANLI

    by nicolaitan Written Dec 27, 2008

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    This incredible rockface on the approach road to the Soganli Valleys called for another emergency roadside stop, no shoulder, no sign anybody had ever pulled over before. But they must have - how could they not? The entire cliff is a warren of residential caves and far more pigeon holes ( dovecotes) than anywhere else we saw.

    Pigeon fertilizer was of great value for farming, manifest by the efforts made to procure it. Tunnels were dug behind the rockface with rooms covered by elevated wooden latticework on which the pigeons roosted. Small holes were cut to the exterior for access. As the pigeon droppings fell through the latticework and accumulated, it would be swept out. Note that the edges of the pigeon holes were painted white ( or in some places apparently red ) to attract the birds. And the edges of the holes were carefully smoothed out.

    We noted that the landscape changed several times between Urgup and Soganli. From the rocky northern Cappadocia, we passed through a green and fertile region with lots of trees, then a monotonous flat area of farmland. Just north of Guzelgoz, the landscape became hilly and rockstrewn, not the attractive fairy chimneys and cones of the north, but just small rocks scattered on a dull surface devoid of plant life. In this region, large caves are used for storage of food and other products for the winter - heavy metal gates line the roadside with occasional large trucks. As we approached Soganli with its stream, greenery returned. This is an interesting drive.

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