Sanliurfa Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by smirnofforiginal
  • Things to Do
    by smirnofforiginal
  • Things to Do
    by smirnofforiginal

Most Recent Things to Do in Sanliurfa

  • Balıklıgöl

    by Schuelke Written Apr 18, 2012

    Beautiful and peaceful. The Ottoman-era Rızvanıze Mosque, built near the cave where the prophet Abraham was born, overlooks the pool where he was allegedly spared death. Known as Balıklıgöl (Pool of Sacred Fish), it is home to a thriving population of carp. Visitors drawn by the story of the prophet as well as the graceful arches and lush greenery surrounding the pool, may feed and admire the sacred carp.
    Check out the following video to get a better idea:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fz8HbCWaHy0

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    Bedesten

    by smirnofforiginal Written Sep 1, 2011
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    This is the covered market which is in the centre of the bazaar. The bedesten was actually a caravanserai which sold silk.

    Right next to the bedesten is a beautifull courtyard which is the most wonderful place to chill away from the scorching sun and to grab a drink, meet up with friends, play some backgammon,,,
    There is even water that runs through to help cool you down further (see photo 3!)

    It is a very relaxing place to come after exploring Sanliurfa. The mood is comfortable and the drinks are cold!

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    Bazaar

    by smirnofforiginal Written Sep 1, 2011
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    For me this bazaar was much more fun than the Grand bazaar of Istanbul... the jumble of little streets, packed with more stalls and less neon lit shops.
    It was built in the 16th century and I hazard a guess that you could buy or acquire most items somewhere within the tangled streets.

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    Golbasi connecting Dergah

    by smirnofforiginal Written Sep 1, 2011

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    All around this area are parks, mosques and beautiful, mostly arcaded, courtyards.
    It is a peaceful place where people come to worship or spend quiet time with their families.
    The entire area is a photographers paradise and the people found to be nothing but friendly, gentle and (for a couple of camera shots) obliging. Families with children will show interest and try to exchange a few words with you if you have children - acknowledging nods and smiles to swapping children's names...
    It is a very lovely place to hide out of the relentless midday sun and heat!

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    Hazreti Ibrahim Halilullah

    by smirnofforiginal Written Sep 1, 2011

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    Prophet Abraham's Brith Cave is a place of pilgrimage. There are separate sections for men and women and women must be fully covered (cloaks are available if you are inappropriately dressed). There is not really a lot to see... it is a cave and inside the cave there is access to water which people were using to fill containers - it is said to be holy water. Photography is not permitted inside the cave and I personally felt that I was crashing in on peoples religious experience.
    Admission is TL1 so a visit is not going to break the bank!

    King Nimrod had a dream and, faring that a newborn baby would grow up to steal his throne, he ruled that every newborn be killed. Legend is that Abraham was secretly born here and lived, in hiding, here for the first 7 years of his life.

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    Golbasi

    by smirnofforiginal Written Sep 1, 2011

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    This is a beautiful, beautiful area... grounds, gardens, rose gardens and then the extremly long pools full of holy carp (fish). If you catch one you will go blind (legend has it) so you are much better settling for feeding them with the fish food that can be purchased for a few kurus.... keeps adults and children alike, happy!

    The story behind these carp filled waters is that Nimrod put Abraham on a funeral pyre and God turned the fire into water and the coals into carp... however these fish got here they are certainly in their version of fish heaven!

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    Bold Ibis Birds /Kelaynak

    by traveloturc Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    last birds
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    Birecik and the hills of Birecik is the main stop of this birds.They are coming from Ethiopia and Madagascar also visible in Morocco and Algeria .They come here every year and they are trying to survive .The local people accept them with a lot of care and the last samples of the world are under protection..I hope that the plans work ...

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    Golbasi- The Sacred Pool

    by suvanki Updated Jan 18, 2008

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    Sacred Carp, Sanliurfa

    This large rectangular pool is known as Abadur Rahman Havuzu, and contains hundreds of 'sacred' carp.

    It is claimed to have dated back to Abraham, or to have been built by King Abhar 1X.

    Legend has it that anyone who eats the fish will go blind! This has resulted in an over population of the fish , which are now believed to be cannibalistic!

    According to Christian legend, Abraham was busy destroying pagan gods in ancient Urfa- Nimrod (the local king) was a bit put out by this, and hence decided to end Abrahams activities by burning him on a traditional funeral pyre! However, God decided to spare Abraham, by turning the fire into Water, and the burning coals into fish! Thereby, providing this pleasant carp filled pool!

    Islamic legend tells a similar story, but with the added twist, that the sadistic Nemrut catapults Abraham from a giant sling shot situated high on the citadel, into the burning fire. The sling is represented by the 2 corinthian columns at the entrance to the kale!

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    Dergah- 2

    by suvanki Updated Jan 18, 2008

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    Islamic architecture, in Dergah.

    These attractively decorated domed ceilings, are typical examples of Islamic architecture, being symetrical in design. They cover the open walkways, surrounding the courtyard of the mosque.

    For me, they provided welcome relief from the heat.
    Stall holders were selling religious scripts, books and cards etc.

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    Dergah-

    by suvanki Updated Jan 18, 2008

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    mosque courtyard with ablutions fountain,Dergah.
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    Dergah is the area of Urfa south east of the sacred pools of Golbasi, which contains a complex of mosques and medreses

    This area is important for Muslim pilgrims, as the supposed birthplace of the prophet Ibrahim. Ibrahim or Abraham is an important figure in the Jewish and Christian faiths also.

    The Mevlid-i-Halil Camii (mosque) holds the tomb of Saint Dede Osman, a cave in which there is a hair from prophet Ibrahims beard and the supposed birth cave of the prophet Ibrahim.

    Entrance is free. Women should cover their heads before entering.

    To accomodate the increasing number of visitors, a newer mosque was built in the Ottoman style, near to the caves.

    Another complex of mosques and mederses, next to the birth cave is known as Hz Ibrahim Halilullah - Prophet Abraham, Friend of God- a popular place of pilgrimage, which has undergone renovation and expansian over the centuries.

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    The Bazaar

    by suvanki Updated Jan 18, 2008

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    Sanliurfa Bazaar
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    I found the bazaar in Sanliurfa to be one of the most fascinating that I'd visited during my years of visiting Turkey.

    Parts of this bazaar seemed unchanged from how I'd imagined life in biblical times to be.
    I seemed to have entered a living museum!

    The covered bazaar (Kapali Carsi ) remains virtually unchanged from Ottaman times
    The Gumruk Hani or customs depot is an ancient caravanserai, and nearby is the open bazaar.

    Men sitting cross legged on raised platforms, writing letters (dictated by illiterate locals), or hand sewing, crafting leather etc. I eventually understood the reason for those low crotched baggy trousers, (nick named poo - catchers!) worn by many of the local men (and M.C. Hammer!)- When sitting cross legged, the excess material is employed as a 'table' to work on!!

    Brightly clothed water sellers, gold merchants, the call of fruit and veg sellers, the fragrant spices and herbs, intermingled with chatter of the locals buying or socialising all added to the atmosphere.

    Sheep and mules wandering around the narrow lanes unattended, added to the hurly burly.

    As mentioned before, I was one of very few foreigners visiting Urfa at this time, and I appeared to be the only female foreigner in the bazaar at this time. I never felt daunted though, the local men, boys and women were all very friendly, and I had many requests to take their photos. I can't remember being hassled to buy anything at all.

    Afraid this photo's a bit dark, but gives one view of the bazaar!

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    Finding Your Way Around Urfa etc.

    by suvanki Updated Jan 13, 2008

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    Arched entrance to The Sacred Pool

    Unless the layout has changed drastically in the past 12 years, I found Urfa (OOR-fah) quite easy to get around.

    Most of the sights are in the old town ( The Bazaar, Golbasi (GURL-bah-shuh)-pool, Mosques and park, Dergah (dehr-GYAH)-for Prophet Abrahams birth cave, mosques and the tomb of Saint Dede Osman).

    These all are situated at the foot of Damlacik hill- south of the city, probably the highest point in Urfa, on which the kale is perched, and the 'Throne of Nemrut'

    The bus station -otogar (OH-toh-gahr) is towards the West edge of town off the Gaziantep- Diyarbakir highway. Probably best to get a taxi to the centre - ask for Belediye - (In the new town), where most of the hotels such as the Turban and Harran are located, as well as the Tourist Information office (open 7 days a week in summer), PTT and banks.
    The hospital (Devet Hastanesi) is just north east of the otogar

    There are also inexpensive hotels around the bazaar/ Abrahams Cave and Golbasi.

    Restaurants and lokantas are to be found all over, but Koprubasi Carsisi, behind the Turban has a wide range of inexpensive lokantas etc.

    For alcoholic beverages, you might only be able to find these in hotels such as The Harran and Turban

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    Balikli Gol

    by traveloturc Updated Jun 10, 2006

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    lake of fishes
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    According to the Bible and Quran it is the birthplace of Abraham before his migration to Canaan, According to the legend the cruel King Nimrod, launched Abraham with a a catapult from the city's citadel and he fall into a pile of burning wood. Happily, God turned the fire to water and the woods to fish, and today, the visitor can visit the Halilul Rahman mosque complex surrounding Abraham's Cave and The Pool of Sacred Fish (Balikligöl) around it. The cruel ruler's giant catapult is represented by two Corinthian columns still standing at the top the citadel or castle.The fishes of the lake are considered as holly fishes thats why nobody try to catch them

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    Entrance to Golbasi

    by suvanki Updated Sep 18, 2005

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    Arched gateway to Golbasi
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    This attractive gateway is the way to enter Golbasi. As you can see from the 2 pictures, the Kale is quite close, as is the new mosque in the foreground.
    In front of the gateway is a busy taxi rank and theres also a bus stop nearby.
    Hawkers and stall holders are usually to be found around the entrance too, but I don't remember them being too much of a hassle

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    Golbasi - feed the fish!

    by suvanki Written Jun 16, 2005

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    Vendor, Golbasi, Sanliurfa

    Local Vendors can be seen sitting around the pool, selling small dishes of what looked like chick peas. These are for feeding the fish!
    Although signs around the pool, request that for the fishes health they are not fed, these would appear to be ignored!
    I watched as people handed over a few Lira, then witnessed the 'feeding frenzy' as the carp fought for these treats!

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Sanliurfa Things to Do

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