Trabzon Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by June.b
  • stairs leading to the entrance of the monastery
    stairs leading to the entrance of the...
    by June.b
  • pathway going up to the monastery
    pathway going up to the monastery
    by June.b

Most Recent Things to Do in Trabzon

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    Uzun göl ( long lake )

    by traveloturc Updated Apr 20, 2011

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    Uzun Gol ( long lake ) is located 99 km far from Trabzon and 1090 m above the sea level
    The lake is 100 m long 500 m widht and 15 m depth.There are also many bungalows around the lake and you can spend some time in this beautiful spot.

    the view from the mountain the long lake citizens of the lake ( green head duck)

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    Walk along the seaside

    by June.b Updated Sep 22, 2010

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    We walked from our hotel to bide the time, it's just past 8am and our transport that will take us to Sumela Monastery will pick us up at 10am. So we decided to have a walk.

    Took us about 10 minutes crossing the highway over a pedestrian lane to the seaside, passing by a seaside restaurant that is still closed. The portion at the end of the sea near the tunnel on the highway has a great view with a somewhat cave where the waves are splashing. (see pic).

    I'm sure this area with all those tables and chairs beside the water is teeming with activities late in the afternoon and at night. No people yet except for one fisherman during the early hour in the morning were there.

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    Sights around Trabzon city central

    by June.b Updated Sep 22, 2010

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    We did not have enough time to explore Trabzon city itself as we have concentrated our time for Sumela Monastery, except for a couple of hours in the morning walking around until we've reached the seaside.

    the mosque just below our window at Hotel Nur illuminated mosque at night old structure along the highway the tunnel along the highway seaside
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    The Sumela Monastery (6) -View from distance

    by June.b Updated Sep 21, 2010

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    I was the last one who arrived at the starting point, at the entrance of the Altindere National Park and all of the others are already in the van. That's because aside from it started raining already and am soaking in rain water, I was mesmerized by the surrounding streams and falls along the highway, so I took some pictures.

    Besides, the walk back to where the van is, is just so long on a winding steep-y highway, slippery at times and there are lots of passing vehicles, dangerous curves.

    And finally, I felt like the driver did not drop us at the right and easier way to the monastery when all cars are going that way, waiting for their people at the foot of the mountain along the highway... C'mon!

    view from afar of the monastery going back down passing along several streams ...and falls, nice sceneries around sumela
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    The Sumela Monastery (6) - Inside

    by June.b Updated Sep 21, 2010

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    The various monastery barracks and homes are not open for viewing so only the centrepieces are accessible to the public, there may be some restorations going on.

    WWe only stayed an hour inside and started our way back down the main entrance of the Altindere National Park where we started climbing.

    I realized that the tarmac way is eaiser thoung longer, as I've meet people coming on the way to the monastery while were descending. The way up on this route is shorter and easier although the road/highway back to the park where our van will be waiting is seriously long, took us about 2 kilometers of walk on a winding highway, passing gorgeous streams and falls. And the view of the monastery from a distance can be had from here, and there goes the dramatic cliff-y location.

    I wonder why our Eyce Tour van did not drop us along this highway near the monastery which I summed up to be only about 300 meters or so walk up and may only take 15 minutes, instead of the more than 30 minutes of steep climbing that we took, and where most people with vehicles took? That was a bit of a steal!

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    The Sumela Monastery (5) - Inside

    by June.b Written Sep 21, 2010

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    The personnel at the monastery prevented people from using flash while taking pictures inside the church cave which is just right to preserve the beutiful frescoes.

    Looking closely, you'll notice the various vandalism made on the scenes of the frescoes, may be done by visiting tourists themselves. An act of irresponsibility and show of no respect to religion, culture and history.

    Just ope that tourist would stop doing such act for a beautiful history told on walls and rocks for generations to come. Am becoming sentimental again.

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    The Sumela Monastery (4) - Inside

    by June.b Written Sep 21, 2010

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    The cave church is the centerpiece of the monastery. With elaborate frescoes inside and out, inside the coloured paintings on the ceiling and walls is dramatically iluminated by the sunlight - screened partially by the overhanging rock on top - seeping inside the cave church, rendering enough light to give the scene a breath-taking view.

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    The Sumela Monastery (3)

    by June.b Updated Sep 21, 2010

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    continued...

    The ticket window opened at 1:30 and people started to form a queue, a bit chaotic, and everyone wants to get to the window ticket booth. Most locals have their museum pass - i think entrance is free during holidays (Bayram) and we have paid the TL8 entry fee.

    Walked up the steep stairs and got in.

    The rock hewn monastery structures is unebelievably beautiful, we alked down several stairs to get to the center and there are several structures including what appeared to be a church with coloured frescoes inside and out of various saints including the Virgin Mary and Jesus Christ.

    I think the other building are closed for public. Nevertheless, it was an awesome sight and I suddenly realized that the tiring walk was worth it after all.

    inside the sumela monastery
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    The Sumela Monastery (1)

    by June.b Updated Sep 21, 2010

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    The Sumela Monastery is located 30 kms from the city of Trabzon in a region called Macka. The monastery is located up the mountian on a cliff rendering a very dramatic location and spectacular views all around.

    We booked our transport (just a driver, no guide) to take us and pick us up again at our hotel (Nur), costs TL20. Ulusoy and Varan and most tour operators around the centrum offers the same.

    We were picked up at 10am, along with about 9 more people in the van. The drive was about an hour or so along a scenic route of forests and water streams or brooks? We arrived at the entrance of the Altindere National Park, restaurants and shops around amidst the several beautiful streams. We did not waste time though I so wanted to relax at one of the tables for awhile and enjoy the environs, but no, we have to get going as the van will pick us up at 3pm and it's almost mid day.

    I never imagined though that the way up from this park to the monastery is a tiring hike along the winding forest though there's a path and some stairs at every turn. If you walk fast which isn't possible for most, you could reach the top at less than half an hour, otherwise, you can walk leisurely - again not so leisurely as I was sweating pails of my body fluid - and get to the monastery is less than an hour.

    Reaching the top, I've noticed that there are only 4 of us left, I think 3 backed out from walking and the two went on another route.

    ... (read the continuation)....

    stairs leading to the entrance of the monastery pathway going up to the monastery view of the national park along the way up almost there, few more steps walk walk walk
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    The Sumela Monastery (2)

    by June.b Written Sep 21, 2010

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    continued...

    took me lots of sweat, toungue sticking out, lungs gasping for air, and tired legs going walking up the pathway which are sometimes slippery and steep to get to the top in more than half an hour not-so-leisure walk. And at last we've reached the top.

    A small park with many stairs in the entrance of the monastery and a long stairs going up to the main entrance/door. Reaching the monastery at around 12nn, it was still closed and opening at 1:30pm (on a Bayram holiday). I've heard entrance for local tourists are free so there are about a hundred of people waiting at the entrance park.

    We've waited and took lots of pictures, drank a refreshing water at the fountain and mingled with the locals.

    entrance to the monastery ticket office view of the mountains surrounding the monastery story of the monastery at the entrance
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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    Aya Sofya Church / Museum

    by suvanki Updated Jan 25, 2008

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    Now a museum, The Aya Sofia is worth a visit to see the stunning frescoes that adorn the walls and ceiling of the former Haghia Sophia, or Church of the Divine Wisdom.

    Built in the mid 13th century as a monastery church, (its architecture having examples of Georgian and Seljuk design), on a raised terrace overlooking the Black Sea. (Apparently Hadrian built a Temple to Apollo on this terrace).

    There are no remains of the monastery.

    Until the late 1960's Aya Sofia was isolated, with clear views to the sea and distant Trabzon.

    A rush of building work in the vicinity, from this time has lessened the peaceful illusion, but it is still a pleasant place to visit.

    This church was known as the Jewel of Trebezond, a white and ochre coloured Byzantine church, with a red tiled roof.
    The Comneni monastery church had 3 naves.

    Emporor Manuel 1 modified the building further, making it a cruciform plan, and adding a dome and the three precting outer porches.

    Following the Ottoman Conquest in 1461, Mehmed 11 converted all churches to mosques . As was usual practice, frescoes depicting biblical scenes, were covered by whitewash, and plaster.

    The building was used later as a military storehouse, and a fever hospital.

    Restoration took place during the 1960s, with a lengthy and painstaking rescue of the painted murals.

    The tall grey stone building is the old bell tower, which was completed in 1427. The arched porches contain marble columns, and the carvings around the archways are typical Seljuk design, (look for the geometric medallions, lotus flower and star motifs, plus the stalactite work) This work would have been added during its time as a mosque.

    Against the wall surrounding the Aya Sofia are grave stones from the Ottoman period. Some of these have different styles of headware, such as turbans to indicate the status of the deceased.

    The museum is open Tues -Sun 0900 - 1800 hrs April - Oct, and 0900 - 1700 hrs Nov - March

    There is a tea garden and souvenir stalls

    Aya Sofia , Trabzon, Turkey Ottoman Tombstones, Aya Sofya museum, Trabzon Aya Sofia, Trabzon Projecting Porch, Aya Sofia Trabzon Aya Sofya, Trabzon
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    Aya Sofya Church / Museum - Frescoes

    by suvanki Updated Jan 24, 2008

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    Following the Ottoman Conquest of 1461, all churches in Trebizond (Trabzon) were converted to mosques.

    The 13th century frescoes of The Aya Sofya, which depicted Biblical scenes, were covered in whitewash, by the Muslims (which inadvertantly preserved the brilliant coloured paintings).

    Later, heavy plasterwork was superimposed, (which damaged much of the plasterwork below).

    In 1957, work began to painstakingly rescue and repair the frescoes.
    This project was carried out by Edinburgh University, and The General Directorate of Foundations, under the supervision of David Talbot Rice and David Winfield, and was completed in 1964.

    Depicting scenes from The Old and New Testament, as well as Saints and Apostles, The frescoes were all done in the late 13th C, in the tradition of Constantinople, with some Cappadocian influence. It is believed that they were all the work of one artist!

    They are recognised as one of the worlds most important collections of late-Byzantine art.

    You enter the narthex (vestibule) through the Western entrance, to view the best preserved examples.

    The Marriage at Cana is considered to be one of the most beautiful.
    Other scenes are of The Feeding of the Five Thousand, Christ walking on the water, and the Miracle of the boy posessed of a demon.

    Look out for the label on the fresco of The Angel of The Holy Shroud, which has been translated into The Angel of The Holy TOWEL!

    A frieze on the South Porch depicts the story of Adam and Eve.

    I thought the frescoes were stunning! well worth a visit.

    Please see above tip for museum opening times etc.

    Frescoed Dome, Aya Soya, Trabzon Painted Archway, Aya Sofya, Trabzon Frescoed Dome, Aya Sofya, Trabzon
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    the Museum of Trabzon

    by traveloturc Updated Aug 29, 2007

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    The owner of the house was Kostaky Teophylactos which was bankcrupt after the revolution in Russia in 1917.Ataturk(founder of Turkiye Republic) stayed in this house in his first visit to Trabzon and after this building was used as a girls schools.After the restauration now it serves as a museum The first floor is Ethnographical the basement is archeological museum .

    the museum of trabzon the entrance of  the museum the balcony  in the dining room for the musicians
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    Sumela Monastery

    by smeagol13 Written Apr 15, 2007

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    I get on the bus of Machka from the Russian Bazaar. it was almost 2 hours' way to arrive in sumela. after passing Machka, the road entered into the forest and a magnificient landscape escorted us.

    on the right was a beautiful valley and a nice little river, and everywhere was fully dark green with the forest. the road was climbing up the mountain, and the height of the trees increased to about 40 meters.

    the valley was deepening and there were little -and even big- waterfalls everywhere. the natural beauty was captivating.

    then the bus came to its final destination and we saw the monastery over us. I looked at it with admiration, and began climbing a really steep way. when i reached the monastery, i was surprised that most parts were ├Żnder restoration. but those places I've seen was already enough for me.

    the history of the monastery goes back to 386 AD. many priests and monks -including cardinal bessarion- came out of this place and when you look outside from one of the high windows of this monastery, you can say that it is the best places to be away from the outer world, and get closer to God.

    sumela monastery the overall landscape - under inappropriate light view from the windows

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    Gulbahar Hatun mosque and tomb

    by smeagol13 Written Apr 15, 2007

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    Gulbahar Harun was the mother of Selim I and thus, the grandmother of Suleyman the Magnificient.

    the Sultan Selim made the architects build a beautiful mosque and a good tomb for his mother, and this mosque is one of the attractions of the city.

    I went the mosque during a Friday prayer and it was quite full. around the mosque is the most historical property areas of the city. old houses, a castle and old narrow streets will provide you with a good feeling id you walk around under a soft rain.

    Gulbahar Hatun mosque

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