Al `Ayn Things to Do

  • Al Murabba Fort
    Al Murabba Fort
    by IreneMcKay
  • Al Murabba Fort
    Al Murabba Fort
    by IreneMcKay
  • Near Al Murabba Fort
    Near Al Murabba Fort
    by IreneMcKay

Most Recent Things to Do in Al `Ayn

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    The Al Ain Palace Museum.

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jan 3, 2015

    We got here by walking through the date palm oasis from the entrance at the Al Ain National Museum. We went straight then headed left when we emerged from the oasis.

    The palace is really beautiful. Entry is free. There are clean public toilets at this location.

    Many of the palace rooms can be viewed. There are also lovely gardens and some ceramic pictures on view.

    I very much enjoyed visiting this sight.

    This palace is the former home of UAE founder Sheik Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan. It was built in 1910 and opened as a museum in 1998.

    It is open daily from 8.30am to 7.30pm except Mondays and on Fridays it is open from 3pm to 7pm.

    The Al Ain Palace Museum. The Al Ain Palace Museum. The Al Ain Palace Museum. The Al Ain Palace Museum. The Al Ain Palace Museum.
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    The Al Ain Oasis

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jan 3, 2015

    One of the best things about Al Ain was that there were several sights close together and close to the main bus station. The Al Ain Oasis is right next to the The Al Ain National Museum. Enter it through the large archway.

    We walked all the way through from this entrance keeping on the straight road when we emerged at the other side, off to the left was the Al Ain Royal Palace Museum.

    The oasis is shady and beautiful. It is filled with date palms.

    At the oasis you can see an underground irrigation system known as "falaj" which brings water from boreholes to the palm trees. The falaj irrigation system dates back thousands of years and is used widely in Oman, the UAE and other countries. To see it leave the main path and go among the trees or you can even view it over the walls.

    Walking through the oasis was a very tranquil experience.

    The Al Ain Oasis The Al Ain Oasis The Al Ain Oasis The Al Ain Oasis The Al Ain Oasis
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    The Al Ain National Museum

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jan 3, 2015

    This museum is on the same compound as the Eastern Fort. Entry to both places is 3 dirham. Clean toilets are available at this sight.

    The Al Ain National Museum contains items about the history and culture of the UAE such as a display of writing implements from old UAE schools, a collection of tools used in circumcision ceremonies, models of women in traditional clothes, models of men using a well, models of men flying falcons, traditional armour and much more.

    I especially liked the gallery of old photos showing the UAE of days gone by.

    The museum also displayed some of the archaeological findings from the Hili Tomb Area.

    There was also a selection of gifts that had been presented to Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan.

    Near the entrance you can look into a traditional Arabic room.

    The Al Ain National Museum is the oldest museum in the UAE. It was built by the former UAE President, Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan. It opened in 1971.

    The Al Ain National Museum The Al Ain National Museum - working a well. The Al Ain National Museum - findings from Hili. The Al Ain National Museum - traditional clothes. The Al Ain National Museum - photos of the sultan.
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    The Eastern Fort

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jan 3, 2015

    The Eastern Fort is also called the Sultan Fort. It was constructed by Sheikh Sultan bin Zayed Al Nahyan. It was used as a residence for him and his family until he became the ruler of Abu Dhabi in 1922.

    We could not actually go inside the fort.

    The Eastern Fort is on the same compound as the Al Ain National Museum and it costs 3 dirham to go in.

    Clean toilets are available at this sight.

    The Eastern Fort The Eastern Fort The Eastern Fort The Eastern Fort Nomad tent near The Eastern Fort.
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    Al Murabba Fort

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jan 3, 2015

    The first sight we visited in Al Ain was Al Murabba Fort because we could see it from the bus station. This fort is three stories high and square in shape; murabba is Arabic for square. The square fort is surrounded by walls and is entered via the main gate.

    We could not actually go inside the fort. I believe you can only visit if you make an appointment to do so.

    Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan was responsible for building Al Murabba Fort. Construction of the fort began in 1948. At first the fort was used as a surveillance tower. Later it became a a police station and prison.

    Al Murabba Fort Al Murabba Fort Near Al Murabba Fort Al Murabba Fort
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    AL AIN ZOO

    by JessH Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    In a perfect world, animals are able to run free in their natural habitat. Unfortunately, mankind seems to have created the need for zoos. I don't like zoos. I never have & never will. I believe in natural parks to protect wild animals from poaching and to ensure their habitat. But I guess if a city insists on operating a zoo, then the animals should be given the best-possible life there is... albeit it's still captivity; but if the zoo is labelled for education & conservation purposes, it needs to uphold the highest standards.
    The 400 hectare Al Ain Zoo & Aquarium was opened in 1969, has one of the largest animal collections comprising of both local and exotic animals & continues to run a breeding programme for various endangered species, constantly expanding their premises.

    Even during our visit we saw that a large section was fenced-off, with temporary smaller cages housing various breeds of monkeys, whilst they (hopefully quickly) complete their larger enclosures.
    You've probably heard me complain about the abysmal living conditions of the poor animals at Dubai Zoo, and I can honestly say that the inhabitants of Al Ain Zoo live in a much better world than their counterparts in the "big, rich city".

    TIP: We arrived early & I highly recommend this, as the crowds start arriving at around 1pm.

    Many of the enclosures are "cage free". Naturally, I thought that many of the enclosures could be a bit bigger, but at least the zoo seems to realize this and has kept the number of animals per enclosure quite low. All animals looked like they were in very good condition, and enclosures were impeccably clean & maintained. The nocturnal house has some beautiful regional species (including gorgeous desert cats)

    There are also very large recreational areas with playgrounds and other activities for children.

    I believe the Al Ain Zoo is doing the best it can and it's fantastic to see that they truly are striving to become a world-class zoo.
    I'd definitely visit this zoo again!

    --> UPDATE MAY 2008: Al Ain Zoo is being given a billion dollar facelift to be transformed into Al Ain Wildlife Park & Resort, with the help of specialists from San Diego Zoo! Completion due 2013.

    A very photogenic Penguin at Al Ain Zoo Oryx enjoying their breakfast at Al Ain Zoo Lions doing what they do best: napping! Main entrance of Al Ain Zoo, U.A.E. The Birdhouse of Al Ain Zoo, U.A.E.
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    JEBEL HAFEET - best driving road in the world

    by JessH Updated Feb 12, 2008

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    JEBEL is the Arabic word for "Mount".

    "Jebel Hafeet" mountain proudly rises 1,240 metres (4,068 feet) above Al Ain, providing spectacular views across the UAE / Omani border. It is often incorrectly named as the UAE's highest mountain because it's so well-known, but this honour actually belongs to Jabal Yibir.

    A modern 3-lane highway snakes up the mountain and has been dubbed as "one of the best driving roads in the world" stretching over 15 kilometres with 60 fantastic curves & twists. (if Jeremy Clarkson of BBC's Top Gear liked this road, it's gotta be good!) Many car manufacturers love testing their newest models here (Mercedes, Mini Cooper, etc.)
    The road scales the mountain and ends at a parking lot with a viewing platform, a hotel and a ruling family's palace.

    And when you're done with driving...

    TIP 1) Al Ain is known as the Garden City of the UAE and has many public parks. Located at the foot of Jebel Hafeet, the Green Mubazzarah Garden provides recreational activities such as sand skiing, abseiling, rope climbing, camping and hiking on special trails. There are also bowling, snooker and billiard centres. Free sheds with benches & barbeque stands are provided.

    2) Situated around a lake created by underground springs at the foot of Jebel Hafeet Mountain and surrounded by jagged cliffs, the Ain Al Faydah picnic resort offers everything from ten-pin bowling to swimming pools. Especially on the weekends (Fridays) you'll see local families enjoying this spot with their children.
    Besides enjoying a boat ride on the lake, you can spread a blanket and sit in the beautifully manicured gardens or pitch a ball in the playground.

    Sunset from Jebel Hafeet, Al Ain, UAE Jebel Hafeet Mountain in Al Ain (from newspaper) Jebel Hafeet (from tourism website)
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    • Mountain Climbing
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    Highest point of UAE

    by xty Updated Feb 3, 2008

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    Jebel Hafeet is one the highest mountains in UAE, standing about 1340 meters high above sea level. Breathtaking view to the surrounding areas like deserts, wadis (dried river path), and Al Ain city when the day is clear (no dust/fog).

    There's an excellent 13 km winding road to go to the top where there is very spacious area for car park and a restaurant/cafetaria. You can have picnic there as well if you will.

    Note: commonly mistaken by people, Jebel Hafeet is not the highest peak in UAE, although it is the highest that reachable by car. The highest peak is Jabal Yibir at 1527 meters above sea level, located in Northern UAE near Oman border. (Thanks to JessH for correction)

    A villa at Jebel Hafeet - the highest point of UAE
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    The Annual AL AIN AEROBATICS SHOW

    by JessH Updated Jan 28, 2008

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    My fiance loves planes, so when I heard about the Al Ain Aerobatics show we decided to "make a day of it" and headed south to this green little emirate. After visiting the zoo in the morning (see my separate tip) we arrive at the Al Ain International airport and were really pleased with the friendly staff and good organisation & layout of the event.
    The Air Show lasts for 4 days and is an annual event. More than 110 aircraft, including vintage and fighter jets and solo and team pilots participated from 40 different countries in the show that entertained more than 130,000 visitors in the oasis city.

    The flying displays were well explained by a commentator on loud-speaker, and the acrobatic flying manoeuvres and judging is recognized as an international competitive event.

    After the competition, the acrobats and daredevil wing-walkers took to the air.

    Outside the display arena, numerous stands by the military, car racing clubs and also heritage organisations were very interested. John was thrilled to be able to hold a gorgeous Pakistani falcon at one of the heritage stands. (You can see more photos in my separate travelogue.)

    There were also plenty of food & beverage facilities as well as large play areas for children.

    If you're in the United Arab Emirates during the month of February and have an interest in aircrafts, I would definitely recommend visiting Al Ain. We really enjoyed our time here, and 40 Dirhams entrance fee (per adult) is truly a bargain for such a great day's activities!

    Wingwalkers at Al Ain Aerobatics Show 2008 Welcome arena of Al Ain Aerobatics Show 2008 Peggy Wingwalker at Al Ain Aerobatics Show 2008 Small plane exhibit at Al Ain Airport (Jan. 2008) Admission ticket of Al Ain Air Show 2008
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    Al-Jahili Fort

    by Doctor38 Updated Jan 8, 2008

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    This fort was built in 1889 by Sh. Zayad ben Khalifa. It is one of the bigger forts and it has some what a unique design.

    One of its corners has a 4 towers encircling each other. on the other corner there is a smaller for within the fort. When I got to the fort there was not even a security guard and I had the place for my self. I don’t think there is an admission fee

    The 4 encirling towers. Notice the tall tree. a view from the tower towards the samller fort The main gate, the Rotana behind it. Inside the smaller castle There is the tree on top one of the roofs

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    Hili Park

    by Doctor38 Updated Jan 8, 2008

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    It is a park where families can spend some time. It also contains the remains of a a settelment dating back to 3000 BC. The remains include graves, Houses and a Falij.

    The Falij is a water way that is dug underground wich channels water channeld to reach to farms. Parts of the Falij will be usually above the grounf. This is the oldest know falij in the world

    A grave site 2 Gazels and a 2 men

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    Al Ain Museum and Fort

    by Doctor38 Updated Jan 8, 2008

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    This is a nice place to visit to learn about the history of the city. There evidence of human settlement dating as back as 3000 BC. The UAE and Oman during that Period of time was known as Majan or Mazon.

    It is obvious from the excavation here and else where in Oman that this area was big in Copper production. In addition to that commodity it also traded in Murr and Insist which are grown locally. The major trading partners where Iraq and the Indian Subcontinent. In this museum you'll see some of that and you can also walk around the fort that has a nice collection of old pictures

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    Jahli Park

    by zuyao Written Nov 12, 2007

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    This is a nice public garden right in the middle of Al Ain town. Nice place to bring your family for a nice stroll or a picnic under a palm tree on a cool evening. Very well-maintained with nice flowers, fountains and palm trees. From here, you would also have a nice view of the Jahli Fort which is located at one corner of the park.

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    Hilli National Archaeological Park

    by zuyao Written Nov 12, 2007

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    Entrance: Dh1
    This is supposedly the site of the Hilli tombs – an archaeological discovery site. But overall, the sights are not very interesting (except maybe to hardcore archaeologist). It is more of a family playground – a place for you to bring your children in the evenings to enjoy the swings or seesaws. The amenities are quite rundown. And when I visited, summer has just ended so there were no beautiful flowers to cheer up the place. Not really worth the visit.

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    Al Ain Palace Museum

    by zuyao Written Nov 12, 2007

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    Entrance: Free
    This is the palace of the ruling Al-Nahyan family which is now open to the public. The compound is beautiful and you get to have a glimpse of royal family life before the discovery of oil. You’ll get to see the private residences, majlis room, coffee room and even the royal kitchen! A nice place to reminisce on the good old days with their simple lifestyle. Even if you are not interested in heritage, the compound is a nice place to take pictures in memory of Arabia.

    The Majlis room The royal bed

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