Dubai Off The Beaten Path

  • Creek Park
    Creek Park
    by IreneMcKay
  • Creek Park
    Creek Park
    by IreneMcKay
  • Creek Park
    Creek Park
    by IreneMcKay

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Dubai

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Air Conditioned Bus Waiting Sheds

    by machomikemd Written Jul 16, 2013

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    wair condtioned waiting sheds
    4 more images

    the RTA Public Bus of Dubai has over 2,700 bus stops scattered all over the Dubai Emirate area and over 600 of these bus stops have air conditioned waiting sheds where passengers and commuters can wait for the bus in cold comfort at these air conditioned sheds are open from 5:00 am to 1:00 am. If you feel very hot from the punishing arabian desert weather that can to as high as 55 degrees celsius (140 degrees fahrenheit), then it is best to have a rest at these waiting sheds.

    just be sure not to stay for too long as the dubai police is known to arrest overstaying persons at the air conditioned bus sheds.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Large Filipino Expatriate Population in Dubai 2

    by machomikemd Written Jul 15, 2013
    at dubai airport
    4 more images

    part two of my tips with more pictures

    there is a large Filipino Expatriate Population in Dubai numbering around more than 500,000 strong. (the Indians and the Pakistanis have the largest expatriate pooulations in the UAE at 1.5 million and 1 million respectively, followed by filipinos and by decreasing number, egyptians, sri lankans, bangladeshis, indonesians, sudanese, etc.

    called OFW's (Overseas Filipino Workers), they are the life blood of the Philippine economy and you can see a large filipino presence in plain sight in the UAE and Dubai as popular filipino busineses have a foothold in dubai like Chowking Restaurant (yes, chowking is a restaurant in Dubai but locals mostly know it as a chinese restaurant), Jollibee, Max;s Restaurant, Barrio Fiesta, Bench Clothing to name a few.

    local philippine products are even avialable at local supermarkets like Spinney's and at convenience stores.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • machomikemd's Profile Photo

    Large Filipino Expatriate Population in Dubai 1

    by machomikemd Written Jul 15, 2013

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    there is a large Filipino Expatriate Population in Dubai numbering around more than 500,000 strong. (the Indians and the Pakistanis have the largest expatriate pooulations in the UAE at 1.5 million and 1 million respectively, followed by filipinos and by decreasing number, egyptians, sri lankans, bangladeshis, indonesians, sudanese, etc.

    called OFW's (Overseas Filipino Workers), they are the life blood of the Philippine economy and you can see a large filipino presence in plain sight in the UAE and Dubai as popular filipino busineses have a foothold in dubai like Chowking Restaurant (yes, chowking is a restaurant in Dubai but locals mostly know it as a chinese restaurant), Jollibee, Max;s Restaurant, Barrio Fiesta, Bench Clothing to name a few.

    local philippine products are even avialable at local supermarkets like Spinney's and at convenience stores.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • LauraofArabia's Profile Photo

    A Trip to the Ibn Batuta Mall

    by LauraofArabia Written Apr 4, 2013
    2 more images

    Ibn Batuta was the Arabian equivalent of Marco Polo. He left his home in Morocco at the age of 21 to perform the Hajj in Makkah and returned 29 years later. he wrote a travelouge of his journey. This mall depicts his adventure. Each section is built to look like a country he visited - India, China, Egypt.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • virtually_cd's Profile Photo

    Chill Out Ice Bar: -6ºC in the Middle East?

    by virtually_cd Written Jan 31, 2013
    4 more images

    When one says Middle East, the desert is likely one of the first images that come to mind--hot, dry, face-burning & seemingly endless, sand-laden long walks. But since Dubai is Dubai (where impossible things can be expected), we suggest that you head over to Chill Out, unless of course you're in Dubai to get away from the cold! DO NOT MAKE IT YOUR ONLY ITINERARY for the day/night as the average length of time that a visitor can sit inside is 15-20minutes. 30-45minutes. if he'd be standing the whole time. Even if the seats were covered with sheepskin, and I was fully covered as well, my pants felt wet from the cold! Chill Out is literally a huge freezer, i noticed.

    Don't bother much about what to wear to get in. They will provide you with a thermal suit (hooded jacket, boots & knitted gloves). We opted for a hot chocolate drink & a chocolate gateux as other food options either just lose their taste, or would have the fat around them go solid right in front of you.

    You will either like this place or hate it. Well, we loved it! We went there as an off-the-beaten-path place--for the novelty. Its lighting changed colors as they sieved through walls, tables, sculptures & seats made of ice, making the not-so-big ice bar very nice for the pictures. We made the most of the cold, by the way--we hugged a lot :)

    Do not expect to have good restaurant food at Chill Out unless you're fine by them to charge a hefty price.

    Are kids ok to go in? Well, we saw a 2-footer enjoying every space. So yours will probably enjoy as well if you yourselves are enjoying :)

    Service-wise, the staff were helpful. When we asked them to take pictures of us, they gladly obliged. There would be small talks if you show curiosity and ask things.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Watering devices

    by solopes Updated May 19, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Well at the museum

    One of the landmarks of Arab culture in Portugal is the “nora”, a very ingenious device to pull water from the wells, using an animal.

    I thought that the device standing in the museum’s yard was something alike, but it doesn’t: it is hands driven, more primitive or maybe, more suitable to elevate water from deeper wells.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • JessH's Profile Photo

    D.I.Y. Desert Driving - Safety Tips.

    by JessH Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you get stuck, you better have a tow rope!
    4 more images

    Many people enjoy taking the wheel into their own hands & heading-off into the sands, underestimating the lethal potential of the desert, no matter how close or far you are from the city.

    I've taken my Jeep off-road many times and here's a useful check-list:
    1. MAIN RULE: Never drive into the desert with less than 3 cars!
    2. The most experienced driver leads the way
    3. Let someone know where you're going and when you expect to return
    4. Examine the radiator for leaks
    5. Turn off the air conditioning to avoid the car overheating & watch the temperature gauge
    6. Check all the car's fluids: oil, coolant, brake fluid, gear oil etc.
    7. Be certain your headlights, taillights & brake lights work
    8. Bring a map. A good one is the "Offroad Explorer" hand book for UAE & Oman
    9. Check your tires; don't deflate them too much! Otherwise you'll need a pump
    10. Make sure at least 2 persons have tow-ropes & an especially designed balloon-air-jack for the sand (any normal jack will, of course, sink!)
    11. Keep your distance! You cannot break abruptly in soft sand.
    12. In case of having to pull a stuck car, stand well clear of the towing rope & close all windows. If the rope snaps, it could easily cut someone's head off!
    13. Bring plenty of drinking water.
    14. Pack a first-aid-kit... it can be a long drive to the nearest medical help
    15. If you want a camp fire, bring wood... there's no wood in the desert!
    16. Make sure you have at least 2 fully charged mobile phones in your group
    17. TAKE YOUR RUBBISH HOME WITH YOU so you don't affect local wildlife & so the next person can enjoy the beauty of the desert!

    If you want to take part in an organised desert trip by professional tour operators, click here for info: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/tp/1300d9/

    Related to:
    • Camping
    • Adventure Travel
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • Rinjani's Profile Photo

    Marhaba – Meet and Greet Service

    by Rinjani Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Meet and Greet Service in Dubai Airport

    Marhaba is an assistance service available at Dubai International Airport. It is quite useful to use Marhaba service if you have family, relatives or friends who come to Dubai for the first time. The Marhaba crew will wait for them when they step off the plane at Dubai International Airport.

    The service of Marhaba including escort from gate until outside including porter service. Or if you use Marhaba service on the departure, they provide escort service from check-in area to the boarding gate. Marhaba also provides services such as bouquet service, Limousine service and also wheelchair for people who need it.

    To use Marhaba service, you need to contact them through Dnata Travel or Emirates Airlines Reservation, or appointed travel agencies. If you come to Dubai Airport, just go to Marhaba counter. You will be required to fill in the form, depending on what package service you need.

    Services available are among others, Diamond Service, Family Package, Normal Service, Marhaba Lounge and Wheel Chair. The price range from 60 Dirhams to 185 Dirhams, depend on the package. You can also request for staff who speak certain language to asisst your beloved people.

    Related to:
    • Business Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Rinjani's Profile Photo

    Send a Postcard, Have a Chance to Be a Winner

    by Rinjani Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dream to Be Rich???

    Postcard Millionnaire.
    Send your friends postcards and have an opportunity to win 500,000 Dirham.
    Sounds like a dream, isn’t it??

    Instead of sending the conventional postcard, people are encouraged to buy a pack of postcards and send it to friends or relatives. One pack contains of 4 postcards and sold at 30 Dirham. You don’t need to buy stamps, since each postcard is paid stamp, and you can even send them for people abroad. Just pay attention where you drop the postcard in the post box. There are two post boxes, for delivery in Dubai and abroad. The postcard packs is usually about Dubai heritage, culture or natural scenery.

    Once you purchase the postcards, You will be given two number sections. The first section is an instant scratch & win section. The second section has a ticket number on top of the coupon.

    The interesting part is, even you are not residing in Dubai, you can also take part. If you visit Dubai, you can buy the postcards and send them to your friends. After that, You just need to check your number in the website (hopefully you are the lucky one : ) )

    971 600 5665 665 (Outside the UAE)
    600 5665 665 (UAE)

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Business Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • wacked's Profile Photo

    Walk like an Emirati

    by wacked Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    King of the Mountains

    In and around the United Arab Emirates, (UAE) there a numerous road trips and desert trails which take you to a mirage of different landscapes. People automatically presume that being in the desert, we only have sand dunes and dust surrounding us, but no so. There is an abundance of oasis's and large rock mountains (as shown in the pic).

    This photo was taken when my family and I went on a road trip to a place called Hatta(That is not me in the photo).

    The Hatta heritage village is constructed around an old settlement and is a recreation of a traditional mountain village set in an oasis. The village helps you discover the old world charm of barasti (palm leaves) and mud houses. There's a large central fort and tower which overlooks the village. Other added attractions are falaj, an oasis and vegetated seating areas where you can cool your heels.

    Signs in Arabic and English will guide visitors to various sections of the site which includes an old mosque dating back 200 years and the Al Husen Majlis, where the governor of the village received guests and visitors.

    It is also worth while popping into to the Hatta Fort Hotel, which is very down to earth and relaxed. (By down to earth I don’t mean dump!) It is a different feel from Dubai and you won’t feel like a fashion alien if you walk around the grounds in shorts and a t-shirts. Lunch by the pool is also lovely and if you have kids with you, make sure you pack their costumes for the trip, because there won’t be much of a chance to hold them back once they see the pool!!

    This drive takes about 1hour 1/2, and has beautiful views all the way through if you go off road and do it in a 4x4 (a must) , otherwise you will be restricted to the vivid colours of tarmac!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Adventure Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Abu Manara Mosque

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Dec 6, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Abu Manara Mosque
    2 more images

    The Abu Manara Mosque is a fine example of Islamic architecture. The Abu Manara Mosque project started in the second quarter of 2005 and was completed in the first quarter of 2006.This mosque was built for a member of the royal family.

    You can watch my high resolution photo of Dubai on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 25° 10' 1.48" N 55° 12' 40.13" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Abu Manara Mosque.

    Was this review helpful?

  • DSwede's Profile Photo

    Weekend drive to Muscat, Oman

    by DSwede Written Jun 8, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In my humble opinion, it might be a bit longer, but recommend driving on the south-west side of the mountains. You could to the coastal route on the opposite direction and cut off some time.

    Pass Al Ain, and enter south into Oman.
    Go through Ibri, to Bahla. You can go up to Misfat Al Abriyyin among other places. Nice mountain stop!
    Continue to Nizwa. There's some places to stop on the way. Last stop is Muscat.

    On the return, if you take the coastal route, make an inland detour to see Nakhal and Ar Rustaq

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • JessH's Profile Photo

    Down by the water... Seef Street Secrets

    by JessH Updated May 25, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Seef Street at dusk (Dubai, January 2009)
    2 more images

    Why don't you choose to sample some real "1001 Nights" (I am not talking about a touristy desert safari with Russian belly dancer) and jump off the beaten path, into a taxi & tell the driver "Dubai Creek, Al Seef Street, near British Consulate", you won't be disappointed.
    Seef Steet really comes alive after dark. Stroll along, watch the boats & abras (water taxis), and the numerous families that enjoy the grass and play areas with their children. Watch traditional wooden Dhows (boats) and modern yachts cruise by on the creek, and the spectacular skyline on the opposite shore.

    HUNGRY?
    Walk down (with the creek on your right) towards the Ruler's Court & experience some of the inticing traditional eateries:

    (Unlicenced - these restaurants do not serve alcohol)
    At the Ruler's Court, close to Dubai Museum, is BASTAKIYAH NIGHTS. A lovely courtyard restaurant where you can sample Arabic cuisine, fresh fruit juices, hot Maroccon mint tea and of course Sheesha (water pipe). Tel: +971-4-3537772.

    Or continue walking past HSBC Bank until you reach the Sheikh Saeed House. This is where you'll find the KAN ZAMAN Restaurant (see seperate restaurant tip) with plenty of indoor & outdoor seating area for more than 400 people. Tel: +971-4-3939913.

    These are some of my favourite spots to sit for a relaxing evening with great Arabic food & aromatic Sheesha. You're in the middle of the city, yet you're not sat right on a main road inhaling car fumes & shouting across the table to your friends. These are the spots that radiate the "original Dubai-feeling" that is increasingly hard to find in our modern & changing city.
    PS: If you do fancy a beer after dinner, you can even walk back up towards Bank Street, across the traffic lights & straight into Rock Bottom's.
    More details in my Nightlife tips

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Shibiru's Profile Photo

    Antique Museum

    by Shibiru Written Feb 26, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rebi and Me at Antique Museum, (africa section)

    It's actually not a museum...it's a warehouse...a huge hall with a labyrinth of anything/everything that you can imagine! If you need a souvenir, a gift, pashmina scarf, a bed cover, a cushion cover, an arabic lamp, a waterpipe, a rosewood chest...you can find absolutely EVERYTHING there!

    It's very hard to find...most of us get lost and can't find it the first couple of times. So just call that number and they will explain to you how to find it.

    Remember to go there with a lot of patience (you easily spend 2 hours there) and bargaining skills...

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel
    • Women's Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Shibiru's Profile Photo

    2nd Hand Bookshop

    by Shibiru Written Feb 26, 2009
    second hand books

    If you love reading and can't stand the expensive malls in Dubai, you should go to the "House of Prose". There are 2 shops in Dubai.

    One is on Jumeirah Beach Road, in the Jumeirah Plaza (when you get in the main entrance, walk all the way to the back, and turn left...it's almost on the exit of the little mall)

    The second one is at the Ibn Battuta Mall (A bit farther from the city, you should only go here if you are staying nearby). It's harder to find, as the entrance is actually outside of the mall. You have to go to the last parking (after Geant supermarket) and walk to the end of the building and it's just on the corner.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Dubai

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

92 travelers online now

Comments

Dubai Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Dubai off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Dubai sightseeing.

View all Dubai hotels