Stores, Malls or Markets in Yemen

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Most Viewed Shopping in Yemen

  • DAO's Profile Photo

    VARIOUS SOUVENIR SHOPS: BUY YOUR OWN JAMBIYA

    by DAO Updated Jan 20, 2014

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    In any large town or wherever you find tourists, you will easily find shops selling Jambiayas. Unlike some of their North African cousins, Yemeni shopkeepers tend to be very easy going and will not pursue you if you say no. Have a long chat with them first and maybe a cup of tea before you begin negotiations. You will both be more relaxed and you will probably end up with a better price.

    What to buy:
    A Jambiya is a dagger with a broad curved blade that the men carry in their belts.

    What to pay:
    $5-7 for a medium sized one that does not have a quality blade. For a large sized, quality blade and a very decorative scabbard you will pay about $20 with a lot of negotiation. You really need to compare and haggle really hard.

    A PROPER JAMBIYA SHOP AND A SMALLER SHOP AND ANOTHER HE ALREADY BOUGHT ONE! SMALLER VERSIONS!
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  • DAO's Profile Photo

    WHEELBARROWS IN THE MARKET: CACTUS FRUIT

    by DAO Updated Jan 20, 2014

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    What to buy:

    You will see the wheelbarrows full of the fruit of the prickly pear cactus just about everywhere. Piled high with ripe fruit, just wait a minute if it seems unattended. Someone will suddenly appear to sell you a handfull. They have a lot of seeds, but are sweet and easy to eat. You may need a knife or just ask them to cut them open for you.

    What to pay: Just a few pennies for a handfull.

    BEFORE AFTER
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  • TheLongTone's Profile Photo

    Available everywhere in shops and markets: Walk like a Yemeni

    by TheLongTone Updated Jan 16, 2010

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    What to buy: The futa , a length of cloth wrapped around the waist like a skirt, is worn by most Yemeni men. The are usually rather sober geometrical patterns in black, white, grey and brown but sometimes gaudy ikat-dyed cloth or fluorescent stripes.
    Or you could buy a knock-off bit of football kit. Actually a Barca or Chelsea shirt works quite well with a futa.

    What to pay: between 1000 & 3000 rials

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  • Local handcraft markets: Nice hats you wont ever wear!

    by Freja1981 Written Mar 30, 2008

    When you drive through the Hadramaut region you will see local markets where the Yemeni people sell their handcraft and you can buy everything from carpets to hats that will provide shade when you work in the field or for when you ride your donkey. The hats might not be what you decide to buy but have a look around and see all the amazing baskets and other things the women make from straw.
    Also, the cars in the Hadramaut region are pimped like no other place in the world!

    What to buy: Bags made of straw

    What to pay: As little as your conscience lets you..they are poor people.

    Local market in the Hadramaut region Local market Hadramaut
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  • janiebaxter's Profile Photo

    Hand Embriodered Belts

    by janiebaxter Written Mar 8, 2008

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    You can buy the traditional embroidered belts that the men wear to hold their Jambiyas (traditional dagger) in markets and Suqs. They are beautifully hand embroidered in gold.
    I bought mine from an old lady on the street in Hajjarah who had been working on it for 2 months since Ramadan and I paid $25 for it (about £13) which seems a lot but the embroidery is exquisite.
    The backing fabric is a heavy cotton calico and the ends are unfinished as it is new. I will need to fix a buckle or some way of fastening it. The second hand ones in the market have fastenings, but are sometimes a bit worn and dirty.

    Hand embriodered belt
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  • janiebaxter's Profile Photo

    Scarf Heaven

    by janiebaxter Written Mar 2, 2008

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    What to buy: Yemen is one of the best places I have visited for buying colourful scarves.
    You can buy them in shops in most towns, souks, markets and street vendors often sell them too. They are all very varied in design and colour and make ideal gifts as the prices are really reasonable.
    I don't know if they are made in Yemen as Yemen has a history of trading with India and The East. We did see some weaving looms in Zabid and Shibam so it's possible some are locally made.
    The quality varies and if you can, buy one that is wrapped up in a sealed bag as they are less likely to have been handled much and will be cleaner.
    Beware of buying them in some of the highland villages, particularly Thula, where the vendors pursue you relentlessly and try to charge $25 per scarf. Their scarves are inferior quality, some had holes in and were dirty.
    The best selection we found were sold by 2 boys outside the Shibam Tourist Hotel and Restaurant in Shibam that is next to the Old Town. These were very nicely packed and they had some lovely weaves.
    In the unlikely event that you don't manage to buy any on your travels around the country the airport duty free at Sana'a has a decent selection but a bit limited in choice of designs.

    What to pay: Between $5 and $10 dollars each.

    Scarves from Yemen
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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Suks in Yemen: Suk (Souk)

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Oct 25, 2007

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    Some important tips for buying in the Sanaa Suk (the most worthwhile bazaar of Yemen). The rules apply anywhere in Yemen. Shopping can be great fun in Yemen.

    1. Haggling is not as common as in other tourist destinations. The prices are usually not ridiculously high tourist prices but more or less what you will pay. Some haggling is okay just for the fun of it, but don`t expect the price to drop to 50% of the original offer.
    2. There are virtually no aggressive hawkers trying to force you buying something you don`t want. The traders will try to get your attention but if you show that you are not interested or the price is too high, they usually accept your decision without hard feelings. It is not stressful to go shopping in a Yemeni Suk. The only exceptions where the villages of Thulla, Shibam and Hajjara, where they practice "hard selling" but even there a "no" will be accepted.
    3. Learn some arabic numbers, it makes haggling easier and more fun. Useful phrases: "bikam hatha" ("th" like in "the") = How much?, "aiwa" = yes, "la" = no.
    4. Keep in mind that many products offered in the suk may are not produced in Yemen but elsewhere. Many goods are imported from China, India or elsewhere.

    What to buy: - the Yemeni dagger (Jambiya)
    - replicas of the beautiful Yemeni stained glass-windows
    - clothing, shawls (though usually not Yemeni, but from India)
    - incense (and incense burners)
    - the delicious honey from Hadramaut
    - silverware
    - old metal or wood boxes with pretty ornaments
    - shishas

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  • The Souq: Yemeni dates

    by Freja1981 Written Aug 1, 2007

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    Near Bab Al-Yemen there are many small shops selling dates

    What to buy: Find the local Yemeni dates which are the best ..and most expensive ones. They are very dry compared to Saudi dates but taste much better!

    What to pay: Depends on how good you are at haggeling

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  • starstudio's Profile Photo

    everywere: Souq's

    by starstudio Written Jan 29, 2007

    Shopping is a part of your itinerary there.
    There is a Mall building, in the very modern side of shopping,
    but i suggest to get involved to the old city small shopps, even you dont buy so many things.
    Nowhere in the Yemen can be described as a shoppers' paradise although, for those looking for unusual souvenir gifts, local craft goods are sometimes available.

    Yemeni silverware can be found in Sana'a and Ta'izz -- some genuinely old, some specially made to look old.
    Curved tribesmen's daggers or jambiyas are often to be found for sale; some are relatively cheap, but others, with more ornate silver and gold decoration or handles made from rare rhinoceros horn, are much more expensive.
    Dont fofrget the fabrics that is in endless colours, arabic designe and indi influence.

    jewleries loepard open souq many are antiques

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Al Hajjarain (and elsewhere): Hadramaut Honey

    by MichaelFalk1969 Written Jan 11, 2007

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    The Hadramaut is famous for its honey, which tastes unlike any honey you can buy in your local supermarket. It is quite expensive, but makes a tasty souvenir. Ask for "No. 1 honey".

    What to pay: 1500 Rial for a glass

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  • dutchwindmill's Profile Photo

    Overview: Other stuff than handicrafts

    by dutchwindmill Written Jan 4, 2007

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    Books on Yemen: Taj Sheba hotel (available in the business centre)
    Western goods: Yemen Mall (on Da'iry Street [Ring Road] close to the intersection with Hadda Road, on the side of Al-Rowaishan BMW/LandRover) and Sana'a Trade Center (aka Libyan Trade Center on Al-Jazair [Algiers Street], close to Tehama Trading Nissan/Peugeot) for watches, perfumes, shoes (Bally's), iPOD, lingerie, jeans (Diesel), Baskin Robbins icecream.
    Stationery/office supplies: Maktabati on Hadda Road (almost across from the BMW/LandRover dealer) and one in Hadda on Hadda Road (between 60 Metres Road and Medina Zakaniya/Beirut Street on your rgigt habd side).
    Clothing: Jamal Street (very popular shopping street West of Tahrir Square); CityMaxx (huge shop for women's, men's and children's day and night wear on 60 Metres Road, on your right hand side coming from Hadda Road, just before the Yemen Petroleum Corporation).

    What to buy: Largest supermarkets: Shumaila Hari (the biggest, also a bit of a department store for clothing, shoes and other stuff upstairs; located off Hadda Road: travelling South it's the first right after the intersection with Djibouti Street); Al-Huda on Zubeiry Street (travel North on Hadda Road, turn left at the end onto Zubeiry Street, on your right hand side after a few hundred metres; good bakery next door; not too far from the Taj Sheba hotel); Al-Jandool (corner of Hadda Road and Iran Street)

    In Aden: Aden Mall (the biggest and newest of the country; a/c). Not very interesting for the traveller, except for Lulu Hypermarket which offers the best selection of products (like cheese, fruits and vegetables as well as non-food) in the country. (Upstairs there's a little department store, but this has nothing special to offer). Lulu (a regional chain of more than 50 hypermarkets) is planning on opening malls in Sana'a and Mukallah in the near future.

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  • dutchwindmill's Profile Photo

    Overview: Handicrafts paradise

    by dutchwindmill Updated Jan 4, 2007

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    As the title suggests, what you'll be looking for in Yemen (if you're into buying stuff at all) are handicrafts. They're available everywhere where there is some tourist trade and the selection does not differ very much from one location to another. Greatest selection is to be had in the souq of the Old City of Sana'a (enter the Old City through the Bab el-Yemen and it will be ahead of you in its full glory). Jambiyas and their belts, jewelry, miniature Yemeni houses are to be found everywhere. There are a few galleries: in Bab el-Yemen (that is in the gate itself); on the square in front of the gate (in the far left corner); and there is the National Gallery (not a museum), which you'll find if you continue straight ahead (North).
    Prices are probably best here in Sana'a, but I wouldn't worry about it too much as most items are pretty cheap. Also bear in mind that poverty is greatest in the countryside, so any income derived from you there will have a greater impact.

    What to buy: If you enter through Bab el-Yemen and continue straight into the street ahead after 50 metres it splits. If you take the street that's more to your left, you'll soon pass a little indoor plaze on your right-hand side with a shop that has a great variety of Kashmiri shawls. Continuing you'll pass the Great Mosque on your left-hand side (peek inside). At the end of the mosque's wall turn right: here some shops are selling typically Yemeni soap stone items, like the pots used for making salta. First left you'll find the National Gallery, which sells paintings, photographs and postcards - entry is free and from the top floor you'll be able to see the Old City from above.
    If close to the Bab (gate) you would have taken the street that was more to your right, you would have passed another - supposedly even better - Kashmiri shawl shop on your right, located at the very street corner. It's tiny, but if you take the steep stairs up you'll agree that their selection is staggering. (Continue straight and after 100 metres you'll come to a little square with the National Gallery on your left-hand side.)

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  • JohnniOmani's Profile Photo

    Everywhere: Khanjar Shopping

    by JohnniOmani Written Dec 28, 2006

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    Old Sana'a is absolutely loaded with souvenirs but men in Yemen take great pride in making and selling the locally named Khanjar. They are on display everywhere and every man wear these traditional daggers with great pride. The daggers are usually on display in the front of the shop.

    What to buy: The khanjars in Yemen are slightly different than other Arabian daggers because they have a leather handles with stripes. The color is usually a dark color and the blade is slightly more tilted than Oman etc. The casing is usually superb as well.

    What to pay: You can pay from $40 to $500 + depending on the quality.

    khanjar shop in old Sana'a

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  • DAO's Profile Photo

    AZAL CITY: BEST SOUVENIR SHOP IN SANA'A

    by DAO Written Sep 10, 2006

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    This fantastic shop is owned by a very nice man named Abdellah Swaid. In addition to selling souvenirs he also can arrange tours and help with local information. Stop in a sit on the carpet and least visit for a while. Have a cup of tea and tell Abdellah what excursions you want to take and you agree the price. I arranged a tour into the mountains other people told me could not be done or would cost more.

    His shop is also full of every kind of souvenir you want for back home. From postcards to Jambiyas, ceramics to jewellery. He has it!

    Need information? This shop seems to be the local centre for ex-pats. Every time I went to visit and get information, a Western student or 2 were always there.

    Please note, Abdellah leaves the shop to go to prayer. I was left in charge of his shop while he was in the nearby Dawud (David) Mosque.

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  • YankeeGal's Profile Photo

    World Friend: Silver and gems and jambias

    by YankeeGal Written Jan 11, 2006

    Kamal, his father and family have been running this precious jewelry shop for almost thirty years. Nestled in the silver district of Sana'a's historic Old City, visitors are made welcome with gracious smiles and open arms.

    What to buy: Black pearls, agate, amber, silver, gold- all sorts of shiney things!

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