Unique Places in Bermuda

  • Lighthouse shining it
    Lighthouse shining it
    by grandmaR
  • Another view of the lily pond
    Another view of the lily pond
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  • Same 2011
    Same 2011
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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Bermuda

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    Waterville

    by grandmaR Updated Jan 9, 2012

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    Duke took us to Waterville, which was the private residence of the Trimminghams is now the headquarters of the Bermuda National Trust. This was originally a place where sailors could come in to shop. Trimminghams, which is no longer in business because the children aren't interested in running it.

    What he wanted to show us was a water lily pond which had the islands of Bermuda in it.

    There is no admission fee at the Waterville.

    Open Hours
    Monday - Friday: 9am-5pm

    Waterville, 2 Pomander Road, Paget, Bermuda

    Bus Routes: #2, 7, 8

    Lily pond with the islands of Bermuda Topiary moon gate Another view of the lily pond statue of herons in the pond small zoo on the grounds
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    Gibbs Hill Lighthouse

    by grandmaR Updated Jan 9, 2012

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    Because I you really can't get to this lighthouse from the bus without walking about 10 minutes from the bus stop, I had put off visiting until we came in 2011 and had a private tour. We went there first because our guide Duke said that if we waited, the parking lot would be too full to even get the taxi into. Here we got out and walked around and Bob and I both took photos. It was quite windy. Since the lighthouse is located on the highest point of the island in Southampton Parish, southwest of Hamilton, we could see the Pride across the sound.

    I had no intention of climbing it at this time. I might have done were I younger. The lighthouse was damaged in Hurricane Fabian, so climbing may no longer be an option. I might have liked to stay and had tea at the lighthouse, but the restaurant seemed to be closed. . Later we saw the lighthouse again from the road on the way back to the ship.

    This is the second oldest cast iron lighthouse in the world built in 1846. (Jamaica's Morant Point Light was built in 1841) The 1-story keeper's house is occupied by a resident caretaker. Operator: Bermuda Department of Marine and Ports Service

    The Gibbs Hill Lighthouse and the
    Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Gift Shop is open

    7 days a week
    9.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.
    Closed for the month of February

    Bus # 8 will take you via Middle Road. Leave the bus at the Henry IIIV restaurant bus station. From there it is a 5 - 10 min walk to the lighthouse.

    Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Pride across the sound Bob Looking Up from the the bottom Lighthouse shining it
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    Party with the locals at Hawkins Island!

    by ReillyGD Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This was a GREAT time! It is a little pricey but worth it! We had a great dinner, enjoyed the scenic beach area of this small get away and danced and drank with the Hawkins Island crowd. It was a lot of FUN!
    Pictures will come shortly - I just got here - Sorry! I have to scan my pix in! Thx for being patient!

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    Sea Venture over City Hall & Arts Center

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    In 1995, when we walked up to the bus station (which we had to do as there were no buses out to the Princess), we always went by City Hall on Church Street. You could see the bronze Sea Venture replica wind vane from near the bus station. (see photo 5)

    The Sea Venture, which was wrecked off the uninhabited Bermudas in 1609 was commemorated in Shakespeare's Tempest.

    Inside City Hall is the Bermuda National Gallery. I have not visited this. The website says:

    "The split-level galleries house both permanent and rotating exhibits of Bermudian artworks.

    The permanent collection has four elements:

    European paintings (of non-local scenes and people) over four centuries including works by Reynolds, Gainsborough, Romney, Murillo and Wilson
    23 African sculptures from the New York Perls collection, purchased from many sectors of the Bermuda community, plus others donated.
    Bermudian mostly cedar furniture on long-term loan from local collections.
    Historic and contemporary paintings, sculpture and photographs.

    A mini-theater serves as a venue for readings, small concerts, lectures, slide shows and films."

    There is also a small gift shop.

    Whole City Hall Sea Venture Wind Vane 2004 Vane face on the tower Fountains in the grounds of City Hall 1995 windvane from the old bus terminal
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    Premier House

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    In the Botanical Gardens, visit historic 'Camden', the official residence of the Premier. No Premiers have actually lived there, but receptions and dinner parties are regularly held at the residence. There is a beautiful cedar-panelled dining room, which is said to have taken up to thirty years to complete. Camden sustained some damage during a hurricane and has been redecorated.

    From the website: "Francis Jones, eldest son of Colonel Thomas Jones of Paget Parish, purchased the home and lived there until his death from yellow fever on September 12, 1796. William Durham acquired it in 1810, then sold it to the Hon. Henry James Tucker in 1823.

    "Henry James Tucker, Mayor of Hamilton the from 1851 to 1870, began to produce arrowroot on a large scale in a factory at the back of the house. The verandah, porch and bow windows in the dining room and drawing room were probably added by his son Thomas Fowle Jauncey Tucker, a bachelor, who continued the mercantile business and arrowroot factory. The Tucker Arrowroot Trade Mark was well respected for quality. Thomas Tucker died at Camden on January 24, 1892, without a will.

    "The property passed to Boswell Tucker in London, England. In October, 1894, Camden and 23 acres of land were sold to Alexander Ewing Tucker for 3,500 pounds. He, wife Violet, and his two sisters Mary and Kate, were the last Tuckers at Camden. Alexander died on August 10, 1934. Violet resided there until her death in 1965. The property then passed to Alexander's cousins, Sir Henry Tucker and his brother Noel Tucker. They sold it to the Bermuda Government as an extension to the Botanical Gardens."

    'Camden' is open Tuesday and Friday (unless official functions are scheduled). On our 1995 visit (picture 2) It was closed for lunch while we were there and we wanted to get to Spittal Pond, so we had to leave. We just toured the outbuildings. In 2004, we got there just to late to visit on Tuesday and left before we could go Friday. We finally managed a visit in 2007

    Camden dining room Front door and entrance stairway 1995 Upper hall from the porch Second story porch Camden
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    Moongates

    by cjg1 Written Jul 13, 2010

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    Moongates can be found all over Bermuda. The Legend says that people who walk through a Moongate, especially young lovers and honeymooners, are blessed with good luck. My wife and I found a Moongate during our first visit to Bermuda and decided to follow tradition and walk through.

    Our Kiss for Luck (July 2010)

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    Heritage Passport

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 23, 2008

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    There is a Heritage Bermuda Passport like there was for Barbados. It is really not given enough publicity - very few people know about it.

    "The Heritage Passport
    "Now you can enjoy Bermuda's top eight cultural attractions for one low price. $25 for adults and $15.00 for children 6-16 years of age."

    [Note: some places say the ticket is $35, but we only paid $25 in November 2004]

    The Heritage Passport allows unlimited admission for 7 consecutive days to the Bermuda Maritime Museum, Bermuda National Gallery (photo), and Bermuda National Trust Verdmont Historic House Museum (photo) open Tues-Sat, 10am-4pm; featuring the Globe Hotel and Tucker House Museum, Bermuda Underwater Exploration Institute, Bermuda Aquarium Museum & Zoo, and Fort St. Catherine. "

    The BUEI (Bermuda Underwater Exploration Institute - photo) is just outside Hamilton in Devonshire Parish. The admission is $10.50 for adults and $8.40 for seniors.

    But the Bermuda Maritime Museum (photo - $10 adults and $8 for seniors) out at King's Wharf aka the Dockyard is worthwhile, and so is the BAMZ ($10 for adults and $5 for seniors and children).

    I went to Ft. St. Catherine in 1963 but didn't go on the 1995 trip went again in 2004. Adults are $5.00 and children are $2.00. So that equals $25.50 admission for adults if you go to all three of them.

    Tucker House is $3.00 for adults and $2.00 for children and the Globe Hotel is $4.00 for adults and $2.00 for children. Verdmont House is about the same and all three of them together have a combination ticket that you can get even if you don't get the Heritage Pass.

    The National Gallery is only $3.00 for adults and children are free and it was free for everyone in the fall of 2004. (I haven't been any of those places except that we saw a movie at the Globe Hotel)

    So if you are only going to one or two of these places, the Heritage Passport doesn't save any money. You'd have to commit to visiting at least the three more expensive ones for it to be a good deal.

    Part of Fort St. Catherine Bob at the entrance to the Maritime Museum at the Approaching the BUEI National Gallery and City Hall Old glass in Verdmont House window
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    Carriage House Museum

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 23, 2008

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    The carriage museum in St. George is interesting and it was free. We visited in 1995, and intended to go again in 2004 but did not have time. This museum is part of a multimillion-dollar waterfront restoration that includes several shops and the Carriage House Restaurant at Somer's Wharf. It is now the site of a restaurant and I'm not sure whether they even have the museum anymore as mostly I read about the restaurant.

    Automobiles were banned in Bermuda as a result of an accident between a car and a carriage. This museum which is part of a multimillion-dollar waterfront restoration that includes several shops and the Carriage House Restaurant is at Somer's Wharf and has a large collection of carriages from the 18th and 19th century. It pays tribute to the age of carriages on Bermuda. This period actually lasted until 1946, when automobiles were finally allowed on the island. Visitors will find a wide range of private and commercial carriages, providing an interesting look into Bermuda's pre-car past.

    The picture is a xerox copy of a photo which I can't find at the moment. When we went to it, it was on Water Street.

    A carriage reflected in the floor. Brick building is the museum Looking out the window of the carriage museum Entrance to the restaurant Carriage Museum is #4 on the map
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    Verdmont

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 23, 2008

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    Although the Bermuda National Trust says that Verdmont is "easily reached by the #1 bus from either Hamilton or St. George's" that's not really true. It is really very difficult to get to on the bus. You have to get off the bus and walk up the hill. The buses run every half hour. When we were finished with our visit, we walked back to the bus stop. Since there was no room to stand on the side of the road at the bus stop for the bus in the direction we wanted to go, we sat on a wall on the other side of the road. When the bus came, Bob sprinted across the road to the other side to give me a chance to get over there.

    No photographs inside.

    The 1710 Georgian-style house, with its 4 huge chimneys, never had electricity or any other modern amenities installed. No plumbing or running water, no electricity, no air conditioning, no ceiling fans and no heating (other than the eight fireplaces), even though it was a private residence until 1951. It was once the home of Hon. Thomas Smith, the customs collector (which is where the name Collector's Hill comes from.) I didn't regret not taking pictures inside except for not being able to take pictures of the children's dollhouse. Each room had a list with the provenance of all the furniture and other items in the room. Outside there are also rose and flower, herb and mixed period gardens.

    Their website sayd: The Verdmont Museum is a treasure trove of antique cedar and mahogany furniture. There is a fine collection of English and Chinese porcelain on display, portraits of former residents and a children’s playroom complete with original furniture and toys. While there, check out what is, arguably, the finest cedar staircase in Bermuda. In 2003, Verdmont was given a major award by the American Society of Travel Writers (SATW) recognizing its restoration

    At the top of Collector's Hill, Sayle Road junction, Smith’s Parish

    Hours: 10:00 – 16:30 pm, $4 for adults, free for children under 12

    The Bermuda National Trust offer a combination ticket for $10 which allows entrance to the Bermuda National Trust Museum, the Tucker House Museum and the Verdmont Museum. It is also included on the Heritage Pass.

    Entrance walk to Verdmont Bob walking in Looking out at sea from the top windows Ceiling rafters Entrance walk from inside Verdmont
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    Bermuda Historical Society Museum in Hamilton

    by grandmaR Updated Feb 1, 2008

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    On Wednesday afternoon (in 1995) after we got back from the Dockyard and the weather cleared up, we walked around downtown Hamilton and shopped. I had heard that the Historical Society Museum was in the Library and was free, so we visited. They were having a quilt exhibit there.

    The website has additional photos of the outside of the building. It says: "Located in the Bermuda National Library, Reid and Queen Streets. This small gem of a museum is filled with antiques, china, old coins, Boer War prisoner carvings, and more. Historical Society treatises are for sale."

    There's even a 1775 letter from George Washington "to the inhabitants of Bermuda."

    The library contains a 1624 first edition of Captain John Smith's General Historie of Virginia, New England and the Somer Isles, a wonderful collection of old and new Bermuda travel and picture books, and a reading room with recent U.S. and British newspapers.

    The building that houses the Library and Historical Society Museum is Par-La-Ville, which was formerly the townhouse of Bermuda’s first postmaster, William B. Perot, in the early 1800s.

    We visited again in 2007, and this time I took some more pictures. The curator called to Camden for me and found that it was open.

    1995 quilt exhibit Library and Historical Society Mrs. Perot's portrait hanging behind Bob Somer's sea chest
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    If your beaten path leaves you beaten up...

    by 850prc Written Aug 21, 2007

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    If you have need for medical services in Bermuda, the main general hospital is the King Edward VII Memorial Hospital over in Paget Parish. (7 Point Finger Road, just south of Berry Hill Road) If you're bunged up in a cycle accident, this is where the ambulance will dispatch you.

    The hospital has a standard emergency room and trauma center, and can provide almost any level of emergency first-aid the traveller might require. As you know, health care costs are always an issue when you travel, and it's always a good idea to carry traveller's health insurance...or you should at least insure that your home health care coverage would apply in a pinch.

    Here's hoping you only see the King Edward hospital on your way to the botanical gardens. :)

    King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Paget Parish

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    Rum lovers? I bet you didn't know that...

    by 850prc Written Aug 20, 2007

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    The official rum of Bermuda is widely considered to be Gosling's Black Seal. However, if you wanted to list the world's best-known rums, Bacardi would probably top the list. Originally hailing from the island of Cuba, the Bacardi rum product is a favorite of rum lovers everywhere.

    You might find it interesting to know that Bacardi Rum company is headquartered in Bermuda, right on Pitts Bay Road at the edge of Hamilton.

    I don't think they have any free samples, and as for tours... it's just a corporate office. But, they have a very nice lawn, a great place for photos.

    Bacardi World Headquarters, Hamilton, Bermuda Sara & Bonnie relaxing on the Bacardi lawn

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    Friends to the Confederacy

    by 850prc Updated Aug 13, 2007

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    A lot of people don't realize that Bermuda played a fairly significant role in the American Civil War. During the war, Great Britain (and their Bermuda colony) sided with the American South, aka the Confederate States of America. This may come as a surprise, considering that so many people believe that the sole purpose of the American Civil War was the issue of slavery. You see, at the time of the war, slavery had been outlawed in Bermuda and Great Britain for over thirty years.

    No, Bermuda's siding with the CSA was all about economics. Great Britain was the world's leading industrial power, and the CSA represented a treasure trove of natural and agricultural resources. The cloth mills of London and Manchester needed southern cotton. Plus, the Brits were still a little bit piqued about being given the old boot some "four score and seven years" earlier.

    Besides being a shipping transit point between the CSA and Great Britain, Bermuda and St. George offered sanctuary to privateers and blockade runners serving the military interests of the Confederacy...as well as their own ECONOMIC interests.

    Over at the Bermuda National Trust in St. George, there's an interesting piece of history. They have the ONLY surviving "Great Seal of the Confederate States of America" press in existence. And, for $5, we history buffs can get an actual foil pressing from this historic device. To see the CSA seal, along with other items of Bermuda history, be sure to visit the Bermuda National Trust in St. George, located at the intersection of York Street and King's Square. Adult admission is $4, children are $2.

    Great Seal of the Confederate States of America This is the seal press, museumed in St. George The Bermuda National Trust emblem

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    The Bermuda Regiment

    by dlandt Written Jul 12, 2007

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    Bermuda maintains a small defense force. I doubt it forms a full regiment, more liek a battalion or a few comapanies. Nevertheless, you will periodically see them about the island. There is one base along South Road where they were seen marching on the parade ground and generally going about the business of any military anywhere. They also have what looks to be a youth corps that marched past us on our way to the beach, shown here.

    band first squad second squad
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    Rent Bikes and Ride the old Train Trail

    by peterd1331 Written Aug 7, 2006

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    You can rent bikes for a relitively low fee at a variety of bike rental places and ride them on the old Rail Trail which runs almost the whole lenth of the island. There are some places where it is paved. Believe it or not, you may see a car on some parts because for some peole, driving on a short stretch of this trail is the only way to get to their houses! It's relitively flat and fun for the entire family. However, some sections are more senic, so ask a concierge or somone willing to help to find the best place to ride.

    Of course, you can bike on the roads too, but be aware of which side to ride on. Also, the roads can be narrow and windey.

    There are also ferries to/from various places on the island, and I believe you can put your bike on the busses (they have bike carriers)

    Enjoy!

    Riding theOld Rail Trail
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Bermuda Hotels

See all 30 Hotels in Bermuda
  • Royal Palms Hotel

    24 Rosemont Ave, Hamilton, HM06, Caribbean

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Solo

  • 9 Beaches Resort

    4 Daniels Head Rd, , MA BX, Caribbean

    Satisfaction: Very Good

    Good for: Families

    Hotel Class 3 out of 5 stars

  • Elbow Beach Bermuda

    60 South Shore Rd, , PG 04, Caribbean

    Satisfaction: Very Good

    Good for: Couples

    Hotel Class 5 out of 5 stars

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Bermuda Off The Beaten Path

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