Unique Places in Saint George

  • Tucker House
    Tucker House
    by grandmaR
  • Back of bench in the room where video tape shown
    Back of bench in the room where video...
    by grandmaR
  • Carriage Museum/restaurant in 2004
    Carriage Museum/restaurant in 2004
    by grandmaR

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Saint George

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    Unfinished Cathedral

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 23, 2008

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    This location on what is now called Church Folly Lane was originally site of the house for the Governor which was built after Samuel Day refused to vacate the house he built when he was Governor in 1700. There was a Governor's house on the site until 1815 which it was demolished to make way for a church which was to replace Saint Peters in town. Saint Peters was considered too far gone to be saved. Financial difficulties, arguments within the Anglican community, and then storm damage caused the project to be abandoned, but the silver lining is that it resulted in the restoration of St. Peters.

    It is now the properties of the Bermuda National Trust. According to Bermuda-Online, stone masons are attempting to restore the building to the original architectural plans which were by the famous Scottish firm of William Hay (who also designed the current Anglican Cathedral in the city of Hamilton and Government House in Pembroke Parish). The plans were saved by Fidelity International, headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts - but with an active international office in Bermuda - and handed to the church's owners. Visitors can enjoy the views even now, but from a safe place.

    Location: Head of Duke of Kent Street, St. George's
    Bus Routes: 1, 3, 10, 11
    Ferry to St. George’s: Apr-Nov only, yellow route
    Admission is free

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    • Architecture
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    Confederate Museum was the Globe Hotel

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 23, 2008

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    This building with the typical twin chimneys was called the Confederate Museum when we were there in 1995. We didn't go because I thought it cost too much. It is now called the Bermuda National Trust Museum at the Globe Hotel.

    The Bermuda-Online website says:

    "It began life as Bermuda's second Government House - dwelling and seat of power of the colonial Governor (Samuel Day) from 1698 to 1700. When he refused to give it up after being replaced as Governor, it became his private residence and a third Government House was built on the site of the Unfinished Church. Later, as the Globe Hotel, it became the headquarters of the Confederate Agent in Bermuda in the American Civil War. For many years it was known as the Confederate Museum. This has now been deemed politically incorrect and the building is now referred to instead as Rogues and Runners, much to the outrage of at least one American writer. "

    In 2004, when we had the Heritage Pass, I thought we might as well go to this (one of the oldest stone buildings in Bermuda) as it was included. But after we shopped, visited Ft. St. Catherine, had lunch, went to the Railroad Museum, and looked at the refurbished town hall, we just made it to this museum in time to see the 13 minute video presentation, Bermuda: Centre of the Atlantic before they closed. Photos 2 of a fisheye mirror and 5 I took during the video tape. Photo 5 is a sign on the back of a bench which says "NOTICE TO VISITORS At the opening of each sitting, when the Speaker enters and on the motion to adjourn, when the House rises, visitors are requested to stand. The Serjeant-at-Arms is empowered to maintain order and decorum in the galleries and may refuse admisssion to persons improperly clad. SPEAKER 2nd April, 1971" I assume from this that the benches they were using came originally from the Parliment building in Hamilton.

    Photo 3 is the way it looked when it was the Confederate Museum in 1995. The timeline for the building goes

    1697 - Samuel Day was appointed the Crown's fifth Governor of Bermuda.
    1698 - He built a large house using materials from Crown Lands on government property and resources. It was assumed by all that the building would be for future governors.
    1700 - When Day is replaced it is found that he had somehow secured title for the building for himself.
    1703 - Day dies in prison (where he was due to a dispute with the new Governor unrelated to the house). The ownership of the property becomes obscure. Then at some point in the mid 19th century, the building was opened as the Globe Hotel.

    1860 - an agent for the CSA located his offices here. There is an exhibit about the Civil War in the U.S. in the museum.

    1952 - Globe Hotel acquired by the Bermuda Historical Monuments Trust
    1961 - in April it was opened as the Confederate Museum exactly 100 years after the first shots of the war were fired in Fort Sumter.
    1987 - Exhibits updated
    1996 (right after our 1995 visit) - building restored and new exhibits installed, including a history of the town of St. George with a model of the Sea Venture. There is also a gift shop.

    Location: 32 Duke of York Street

    Hours of Operation (as of January 2007):

    Nov-March Wed-Sat, 10am-4pm
    April-Oct Mon-Sat, 10am-4pm

    Admission: Adults $5, Children (6-18 years) $2
    Combination Ticket to all three Trust museums $10

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

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    Carriage House Museum

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 23, 2008

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    The carriage museum is interesting and it was free. It was also dark for taking pictures. We visited in 1995, and intended to go again in 2004 but did not have time. This museum is part of a multimillion-dollar waterfront restoration that includes several shops and the Carriage House Restaurant at Somer's Wharf. It is now the site of a restaurant and I'm not sure whether they even have the museum anymore as mostly I read about the restaurant.

    If they still have the museum, it is at #5 Water Street and has a large collection of carriages from the 18th and 19th century. Automobiles were banned in Bermuda as a result of an accident between a car and a carriage. This period actually lasted until 1946, when automobiles were finally allowed on the island. Visitors will find a wide range of private and commercial carriages, providing an interesting look into Bermuda's pre-car past. Photo 4 is a xerox copy of a photo that I can't find at the moment

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    • Horse Riding

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    Tucker House

    by grandmaR Written Aug 23, 2008

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    I intended to go to Tucker House, but we didn't have time. It was at 5 Water Street. We passed it on the walk up from the cruise ship dock.

    It is one of the Bermuda Trust properties, notable because it was the home of Bermuda President of the Governor’s Council Henry Tucker who moved into the house in 1775; his family remained there until 1809. The Tuckers were a prominant Bermudian family, whose members included a treasurer of the United States, and a captain in the Confederate Navy.

    In addition to the usual Bermuda cedar furniture, silver, period kitchen and other artifacts, one room is devoted to memorabilia of Joseph Hayne Rainey. It is believed that Joseph Rainey, a free Black man from South Carolina, operated a barber shop in or near the kitchen at Tucker House from 1862-1865. Rainey and his wife arrived in Bermuda during 1862 - refugees from the American Civil War. In addition to Rainey's barber shop, his wife also established herself as a successful dressmaker. After he returned to the States Joseph Hayne Rainey became the first black member of the U.S. House of Representatives serving South Carolina's 1st District from 12 December 1870 to 3 March 1879.

    There is a permanent archaeology exhibit in the cellar of the house. The artefacts and display panels also chronicle the Tucker Family’s connection to Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia, through Henry Tucker's brother

    Hours of Operation: New as of January 2007

    Nov-March Wed-Sat, 10am-4pm

    April-Oct Mon-Sat, 10am-4pm

    All BNT Museums will be closed Public Holidays
    Admission: Adults $5, Children (6-18 years) $2
    Combination Ticket to all three Trust museums $10

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

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    Somers Park

    by grandmaR Updated Nov 23, 2004

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    This was the monument that was dedicated to Sir George in the park in the 1920's.

    At the top of the monument plaque is a man's head with flowing locks and a mustache (a la Shakespeare except he looks more blond and less bald). Under that is a two masted ship foundering on a reef.

    Then there are the dates 1609 - 1909

    The text under that says:
    "In commemoration of the settlement of these islands on the 28th of July 1609"

    "and"

    "in honour of Admiral Sir George Somers Kt. at whose instance largely the settlement was effected"

    "This memorial has been erected out of a grant made by the legislature of this colony"

    In back of the monument on the right is a public bathroom building which is not in the old photo.

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    • Historical Travel

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Saint George Off The Beaten Path

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