Fun things to do in Saint George

  • Ship at dock in 1963
    Ship at dock in 1963
    by grandmaR
  • White Horse in 1995
    White Horse in 1995
    by grandmaR
  • Bermuda type shutters - open from bottom
    Bermuda type shutters - open from bottom
    by grandmaR

Most Viewed Things to Do in Saint George

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    14. Barber's Alley & Petticoat Lane

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 5, 2014

    Barber's Alley honors Joseph Hayne Rainey. A former slave from South Carolina, Rainey fled to Bermuda with his French wife at the outbreak of the Civil War. He became a barber in St. George and eventually returned to South Carolina, where in 1870 he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives -- the first African American to serve in Congress.

    Nearby is Petticoat Lane, also known as Silk Alley.Petticoat Lane (sometimes called Silk Alley) reputedly got its name when two newly emancipated slaves paraded up and down the lane rustling their colorful new silk petticoats

    I took a picture of Bob by the sign when we were here in 1963.

    From here go to Tucker House

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    15. Tucker House

    by grandmaR Written Oct 5, 2014

    I intended to go to Tucker House, but we didn't have time. It was on the walk up from the cruise ship dock. It was the home of Bermuda President Henry Tucker who was President c 1776.

    This was the former home of a prominent Bermudian family, whose members included an island governor, a treasurer of the United States, and a captain in the Confederate Navy. The building houses an excellent collection of antiques, including silver, portraits, and cedar furniture. One room is devoted to memorabilia of Joseph Hayne Rainey. Joseph Hayne Rainey was the first black member of the U.S. House of Representatives and he once rented space on this property for a barber shop. There is also a period kitchen, and an exhibit based on the archaeological excavation of the site. Open 10-4 Monday through Saturday.

    Diagonally across from the Tucker House is the Carriage House, 22 Water St., Somers Wharf (tel. 441/297-1730), a former waterfront storehouse and also where the Carriage House Museum is or was that we visited in 1995..

    The end of the tour is at 16. Somers Wharf, a multimillion-dollar waterfront restoration project

    Tucker House Carriage house in 2004 Window in the Caririage House Museum 1995 Model carriage
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    13. Bermuda National Trust Museum

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 5, 2014

    When we were here in 1995, this was called the Confederate Museum. The current museum features a video presentation and permanent exhibit upstairs. We got here very late and saw the video presentation but did not get to see the exhibits. The video presentation, Bermuda: Centre of the Atlantic, features rarely-seen paintings and documents in telling the story of Bermuda and the forces which shaped her history.

    The offices of the Confederate agent, Major Norman Walker, were housed here during the American Civil War (1861-1865), when it was the Globe Hotel. Bermuda gave a lot of help to the CSA during the Civil War.

    Admission: Adults $5, Children (6-18 years) $2
    Combination Ticket to all three Trust museums $10

    Go west along Duke of York Street to Petticoat Lane

    1995 photo Picture in 2007 from St Peters 1995 photo
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    12, St. Peter's Church

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 5, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Claimed as the oldest continually occupied Anglican church in the Western Hemisphere, it was begun in 1612 in wood with a palmetto thatched room, and was almost destroyed by a hurricane in 1712. The original altar (still in use) from 1615 was recovered, and the church was rebuilt in stone in 1713. The tower was added in 1814, and the church was restored in late 19th century. The church was also used in the early days for public meetings before the State House was built.

    It has marvelous cedar woodwork inside, a mahogany altar—the oldest piece of Bermudian furniture on the Island; St. George’s chalice which was presented in 1625; a 1594 Bible; Charles I silver; open cedar timber beams, beautiful hanging chandeliers and 'Hog' money found beneath the floorboards during restoration and in the vestry is displayed a silver communion service given to the church by King William III in 1697.

    You can also walk through the graveyard. where you'll see many headstones, some 300 years old. There is a section in the churchyard where slaves were buried. The churchyard is shaded by a cedar tree that is said to be the island's oldest. The assassinated governor, Sir Richard Sharples, was buried here.

    Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily.

    Weekday services are still held here.

    Across the street is the Bermuda National Trust Museum

    St. Peter's Church taken in 1963 Looking down the stairs in 2004 Church in 1995 Sir Richard Sharples grave Church interior
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    11. Old Rectory

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 5, 2014

    I walked up to the Old Rectory to take this picture. It is at the top of Broad Alley, behind St. Peter's Church. Old Rectory is a Private home built by Captain George Dew around 1699 and is one of the oldest buildings in Bermuda. George Dew was initially a pirate and a slave trader. . Alexander Richardson, a bishop lived in this house between 1763 and 1805. He was the rector of the St. Peter's Church and that is where the house got the name. Richardson had a nickname ‘The Little Bishop’.

    Old Rectory is an example of old traditional Bermudian architecture. It is built with white limestone. There is a welcoming armed staircase that leads you to the main door. The windows are placed high under the eaves. Inside, you will see cedar beams. There are multiple chimneys on both sides of the house.

    The property is owned and managed by Bermuda National Trust. It is open to visitors usually on Wednesday afternoons between November to March.

    After seeing the Old Rectory, go through the church's back yard (where you will see the St. Peter's Church Thrift Shop sign) , opposite Broad Alley, to reach: St. Peter's Church

    Old Rectory Old rectory
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    10. Featherbed Alley Printery

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 5, 2014

    The Featherbed Alley Printery was also closed in 2004 because it is the same as the Historical Society Museum. We didn't see it in 1995, because it was being renouvated, and I don't think we saw it in 1963 either. If we had been able to see it would be a working replica of the type of printing press invented by Johannes Gutenberg in Germany in the 1450s.

    The print shop museum was located in the lower level (once the servant's quarters) of Mitchell House at 3 Featherbed Alley. The house is named for its architect, Walter Mitchell, who had it built in the 1720s. It was an 18th Century print shop, though its location was never formerly the site of such a business (see below). The Featherbed Alley Printshop concept was created by the Department of Tourism (DOT) of the Bermuda Government. The Gutenberg press was obtained from a local printing business which had imported it some years earlier.There is also a working replica of a Gutenburg printing press (brought to Bermuda in 1784 to print the colony's first newspaper). . It remained popular in Bermuda and elsewhere for printing of broadsheets for well over 300 years. The museum is largely dedicated to the history of Bermuda's first newspaper and printing business, that of Joseph Stockdale, who published the Bermuda Gazette. Stockdale originally operated his business from the cellar of his own house, Stockdale House, on Printer's Alley nearby (currently a private home, belonging to former news editor Bermudian Lt. Col. Gavin Shorto). Following his death, Stockdale's heirs continued to run operate the business from Stockdale House until they relocated to Hamilton, Bermuda, following discontinuation of St. George's as Bermuda's capital's in 1815 in favor of the much more centrally located and then new City of Hamilton. It is said that St. George's folk objected so much to the relocation and the business reasons for it that they petitioned against the Bermuda Gazette, and the cancellation of subscriptions by many in St. George's, resulting in the closure of the newspaper.

    Go up Featherbed Alley and straight onto Church Street. At the junction with Broad Lane, look to your right to see the: Old Rectory

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    7. Somers Garden - His Heart is Buried in Here

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 5, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In 1876 Governor Lefroy, a great compiler of the earliest historical records of Bermuda, made sure a memorial tablet was erected in the Somers Garden, St. George's, with the following inscription:

    "Near this spot was interred in the year 1610 the heart of the heroic Admiral Sir George Somers who nobly sacrificed his life to carry succor to the infant and suffering Plantation now the State of Virginia. To preserve his fame to future ages, near the scene of his memorable shipwreck of 1609, the Governor and Commander in Chief of the Colony for the time being caused this tablet to be erected, 1876"

    We visited Somers Garden in 1963. Now, the wall that it is mounted on has been painted pink, and the plaque itself has been cleaned up.

    I've always thought the story about the heart of Sir George Somers, the admiral of the Sea Venture, being buried here was at once charming and macabre. The gardens, which were opened in 1920 by the Prince of Wales, contain palms and other tropical plants. I have a picture from 1963 that Bob took of me leaning my pregnant self against a royal palm and this time he took another one of me as a non-pregnant grandmother.

    Walk through Somers Gardens and up the steps to the North Gate onto Blockade Alley. Climb the hill behind the garden to the Unfinished Church

    Entrance to Somer's Garden Monument in 1963 Me reinacting the 1963 photo in 2004 Me pregnant in Somers Garden 1963 Plaque in wall explaining about Sir George's heart
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    5 Bridge House (1690s)

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 5, 2014

    Bridge House is one of the oldest buildings of the island. was formerly the home of several of Bermuda's governors. One of the well known mid 1700 residents of the house was privateer Bridger Goodrich who came from Virginia and was a loyalist to the king. He purchased the Bridge House for $1,000 in cash. He was known for blocking America's sea trade along Bermuda's waters. He also captured local vessels even violating the legislation that was already in place then.

    The house was named Bridge House because there is a small wooden bridge at the opposite side leading to the St. George's Harbor. Bridge House is now split up into an art gallery with a studio and a Bed & Breakfast guest apartment.

    Return to King Street and continue east to the: Old State House

    Bridge House Gate of Bridge House Side door Formerly a B&B behind Bridge House
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    9. St. George's Historical Society Museum

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 4, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We apparently went to this museum on both visits. I have this picture of Bob going up the steps in 1963, and we also visited in 1995.At Featherbed Alley and Duke of Kent Street, is the Mitchell House built c.1731 which is an example of 18th-century Bermudian architecture. It is now the St. George's Historical Society Museum. In both 1963 and 1995 we visited this museum.

    This is called the welcoming arms stairway. I was told that the walls narrow at the top to make it easier for one person to defend the house entrance. It is very photogenic, and I have pictures of it from both dates and some pictures inside of the collection of Bermudian historical artifacts and cedar furniture from the 1995

    There was a tour conducted by a docent. In the home which was built around 1700 by shipwrights, using ship building technques, this museum contains an original 18th-century Bermuda kitchen, complete with utensils from that period. Other exhibits include a 300-year-old Bible, a letter from George Washington, and Native American ax heads. Some early settlers on St. David's Island were Native Americans, mainly Pequot

    Mon-Fri 10am-4pm
    Admission $5 adults, $2 children under 12

    In the same building is Featherbed Alley Printery

    Stairway in 2004 Bob going up Coffered ceiling with  wooden straps inside corner Window detail - top larger than bottom Workmen working on the windows
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    8. Unfinished Cathedral

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 4, 2014

    Climb the hill behind the garden to the structure known as "the folly of St. George's,". I didn't walk all the way up the hill to the unfinished cathedral, but I did get this pictures.

    This was to replace St. Peter's Church.. Work began on the church in 1874, but ended because of infighting and financial difficulties.This location on what is now called Church Folly Lane was originally site of the house for the Governor which was built after Samuel Day refused to vacate the house he built when he was Governor in 1700. There was a Governor's house on the site until 1815 which it was demolished to make way for a church which was to replace Saint Peters in town. Saint Peters was considered too far gone to be saved. Financial difficulties, arguments within the Anglican community, and then storm damage caused the project to be abandoned, but the silver lining is that it resulted in the restoration of St. Peters.

    It is now the properties of the Bermuda National Trust. According to Bermuda-Online, stone masons are attempting to restore the building to the original architectural plans which were by the famous Scottish firm of William Hay (who also designed the current Anglican Cathedral in the city of Hamilton and Government House in Pembroke Parish). The plans were saved by Fidelity International, headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts - but with an active international office in Bermuda - and handed to the church's owners. Visitors can enjoy the views even now, but from a safe place.

    Next go to the St. George's Historical Society Museum

    Unfinished Church Gate of church Another view of the Unfinished Church
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    6. Old State House

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 4, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A few steps behind Town Hall is the State House, built in 1620 by Governor Nathaniel Butler.This oldest stone building in Bermuda, made of native limestone mortared together with lime and turtle oil, was designed in the Italianate style with a flat roof and thick walls to insulate against heat and protect against hurricanes. Until the capital of Bermuda was moved to Hamilton in 1815, the House of Assembly and Supreme Court held session here.

    Today, the State House is rented each year for the lordly sum of one peppercorn to the Masonic Lodge of St. George's. Open 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wednesdays only, except holidays. Evidently we either were not there on Wednesday, or the Old State House wasn't open when we were there in 1995.

    Great pomp and majesty accompany the Peppercorn Ceremony that takes place every spring (in 2003 it was on April 21).

    Continue your stroll down Princess Street until you come to Duke of York Street and the entrance to: Somer's Garden

    State House 2004 Bob walking up to the Old State House in 1963 Old State House in 1995 Plaque on the steps Masonic lodge plaque
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    4 Town Hall

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 4, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The next places to visit is the town hall which faces King's Square. It has been restored throughout with Bermuda cedar and today houses portraits of past mayors from the 19th and 20th Centuries.

    Officers of the Corporation of St. George's governing corporation, headed by a mayor, meet in the Town Hall. There are three aldermen and five common councilors. The Town Hall has antique cedar furnishings. It was renovated after Hurricane Fabian.

    One of the best budget attractions in Bermuda is a multimedia audiovisual presentation, which is shown here several times a day. We saw this in 1995 It was upstairs in the Town Hall and shows Bermuda's early history. The presentation is called 'About St. George’s' and is shown Mondays through Saturdays at 11:15am and 3pm (small admission charge). .

    From King's Square, head east along King Street, cutting north (left) on Bridge Street. You'll come to the: Bridge House

    Town Hall in 1995 Town Hall 1995 The center stone is from Berne Berne Manor, Dorset Some photos of the past mayors Ceiling of Bermuda Cedar
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    3 White Horse Tavern

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 4, 2014

    On the waterside stands the White Horse Tavern: It was once the home of John Davenport, who came to Bermuda in 1815 to open a dry goods store. Davenport was a bit of a miser; upon his death, some £75,000 in gold and silver was discovered stashed away in his cellar. In 1995, this building had Bermuda type shutters which open from the bottom. This allows air to circulate but shades the window from the sun. For a time this was a pizza place and/or that it was out of business for a time.

    Across the square stands the: Town Hall

    White Horse Tavern 2004 White Horse Tavern 1995 White Horse in 1995 Bermuda type shutters - open from bottom
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Cruise
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    2. Ordnance Island

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 4, 2014

    Ordnance Island, so called because the British army once stored gunpowder and cannons here, has a statue of Sir GeorgeSomers

    There are two ports in St. George's - Pennos Wharf and Ordinance Island. Both can take ships of up to 750 feet in length, which are much smaller than the Panamax ships currently commissioned to come to Bermuda. The town itself is within easy walking distance of the cruise ship berth for most passengers

    Also on Ordinance Island is the dock where you can get the High Speed ferry to Kings Wharf (in season and a replica of the Deliverance, the boat that carried the shipwrecked Sea Venture passengers on to Virginia is here along with a ducking stool, a contraption used in 17th-century witch trials and which is used in reinactments by the Town Crier today.



    Retrace your steps across the bridge to King's Square to The White Horse Tavern

    Norweigen Crown from Ordinance Island Ship at dock in 1963 Deliverance replica in 2004 Ducking Stool 2004
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Cruise

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    1 King's Square - Stocks and Whipping Post

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 4, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St. George was the second English town established in the New World (The first one was Jamestown, Virginia). We begin the tour at

    King's Square AKA Market Square or King's Parade, which is the center of St. George is only 200 years old. This was formerly a marshy part of the harbor.

    Also on the square there is a replica of a pillory and stocks in front of the Bank of Butterfield.

    Frommer's walking tour says You could be severely punished here for such "crimes" as casting a spell over your neighbor's turkeys.

    Now-adays at noon on Wednesdays (May through October) in the town's centre, you'll meet the St. George's Town Crier. In his regal red tunic, breeches, and tricorn hat, he rings his brass bell and shouts, "Oyez! Oyez!" (Hear Ye!) He then convenes a tribunal to mete out punishment to a variety of petty offenders using the stocks and whipping post.

    When I was here in 1963 the stocks and whipping post -tools of 17th- and 18th-Century justice were in front of the Bank of N.T. Butterfield & Sons, Ltd. There wasn't any town crier then. If there was one in 1995, it was too late in the season for him.

    Having your picture taken in the stocks is traditional and free as far as I know.
    St. George was the second English town established in the New World (The first one was Jamestown, Virginia) but where we begin the tour at

    King's Square AKA Market Square or King's Parade, which is the center of St. George is only 200 years old. This was formerly a marshy part of the harbor. Next to the harbor and the war monument is a branch of the Visitors Service Bureau. You can buy a bus pass or a Heritage Pass here (cash only)

    Also on the square there is a replica of a pillory and stocks in front of the Bank of Butterfield. Frommer's walking tour says You could be severely punished here for such "crimes" as casting a spell over your neighbor's turkeys.

    From the square, head south across the small bridge to: Ordinance Island

    Stocks in 2004 1963 photo of the Stocks and Whipping posts 2004 Stocks - unused
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Cruise
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Saint George Hotels

Top Saint George Hotels

Saint George Hotels
2 Hotels

Instant Answers: Saint George

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

52 travelers online now

Comments

Saint George Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Saint George things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Saint George sightseeing.
Map of Saint George