Getting Around Northwest Territories

  • Inuvik airport in August
    Inuvik airport in August
    by PeterVancouver
  • Transportation
    by crummey
  • Ferry across the river
    Ferry across the river
    by Rctavel

Most Viewed Transportation in Northwest Territories

  • crummey's Profile Photo

    Kennady Lake can be accessed by ice road or plane

    by crummey Updated Feb 12, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kennady lake is about 300-km northeast of Yellowknife. This is the site of a future mine.

    Kennady lake is a barren landarea on the arctic tundra. There is a lot of water. But it is all frozen. When flying in you could see the ice....deep, dark, blue ice on the lakes and brown murky ice frozen over the bogs and marshes.

    As we flew along in a Dornier, you could see far below, the few ski-doos and the 18 wheelers crawling along the ice road. They looked like so many small black fleas crawling over the belly of a dog.

    Kennady Lake is a small camp and the few people who are here live in canvas tents with kerosene stoves. There is a canvas latrine and canvas everything; even a canvas and plywood make shift kitchen; It is all very quaint. They have internet; one terminal. And a groundline; one phone with a satellite dish.

    Throughout most of the year, weather is cold, wintery, blustery etc. Work is often cancelled because of the weather....you get a thrill from unexpected time off; Like when you played hooky in school.

    Work is 12 hours a day; 12 dollars an hour. Free food; good food. Chips, bars, pepsi, potatoes, meat...real food; No rice. No vegetarian.

    In total there are about 50 people here and about 25 plywood and canvas buildings. That includes everything; the laundry and medic and kitchen and garage...everything.

    All buildings are heated with a keronsene stove and lots of hooks to dry clothes over the fire. In the middle of the night it is very reassuring to look over at the orange flames of the stove.

    Crummey jason crummey & skidoo Wayne Waldbauer & Jason Crummey
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Business Travel
    • Work Abroad

    Was this review helpful?

  • omehes's Profile Photo

    Cost of fuel

    by omehes Written Aug 28, 2008

    The petrol to sub-arctic Northwest Territories is hauled from Alberta by big tankers. And this is reflected in its price. In Yellowknife I payed 1.54CDN/L at the probably most expensive station in the town near the Information Centre. The other stations sold the regular petrol for around 1.48CDN/L (when down in Calgary it was for about 1.30CDN/L.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Motorcycle
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • crummey's Profile Photo

    Ice Road, NWT

    by crummey Updated Oct 12, 2006

    “Lac De Gras” is at approximately 64 degrees north; Very close to the Arctic Circle.

    The winters are long and cold. The primary industry is the diamond mines. the NWT Mining Act dictates for how long that people can stay. The mining camps are drug and alcohol free. There is a disproportionate male to female ratio.

    Ek’ati is the name of a Diamond mine near Lac De Gras, NWT. There are other diamond mines in the vicinity including Diavik Diamond mine on East Island, Lac De Gras and Snap Lake Diamond project slightly farther to the south. Alcohol is banned from these camps.

    The camps are designed with "arctic corridors" so that people rarely have to leave the buildings. In spare time from work, people press weights, exercise, pursue their individual hobbies, cruise the net, watch satellite TV, gossip etc..

    The nights are very long in winter and the northern lights are, of course, breath taking.

    If you are thinking about coming to the Lac De Gras region, access is by the “Ice Road” from late December to early April. For the rest of the year access is only by plane.

    skidoos are fun Jason and Jergen

    Was this review helpful?

  • crummey's Profile Photo

    Hitchhiking around Canada

    by crummey Written May 28, 2004

    After spending the whole winter in the arctic, spring came. The ice had finally broken enough to leave Yellowknife.

    We, all three of us hitchhiked to Vancouver Island. We got a 18 wheeler from Yellowknife to High Level.

    When we reached the MIGHTY MACKENZIE ice and growlers and slush and birgy bitspushewd down the river and spun the boat around in the ice. The captain had to giver to the engines for us to get through the white and blue ice that glistened in the midnight sun.

    And so we made it to High Level Alberta. By the time we got to High Level, we noticed that it gets dark at night. Because we had been coming from Yellowknife straight south for some 9 or 10 hours. Darkness was welcome. Because the arctic midnight sun can drive you mad. That night we had a large bonfire and went drinking with some elderly Dene Indians It was fun.

    When we got picked up, it was with a set of twins. They were champion bull riders from the rodeao. They dropped us off at Grande Prairie in the Rocky Mountain Foothills. That day we managed to hitch hike to Grande Cache - a small town in the Rocky Mountains that is very close to Jasper National Park. And surrounded by snow capped peaks. We camped at Grande Cache for the night and got a couple of bottles of hooch and went drinking in the woods. It was a great time.

    The next day we hitchhiked to Jasper National Park, Tete Juene and ultimately Valemont. Which is nestled snuggly in the ice capped Rocky Mountains. We got picked up by the ususal assortment of 18 wheelers, pot heads, religious zelots and conspiracy theorists. It was a lot of fun.

    In Valemont we pitched camp and spent the night. The next day we split up...thinking it would be faster....and hitchhiked to Vancouver. We stayed up all night exploring the town. In the morning we left for our destination- Vancouver island.

    Related to:
    • School Holidays
    • Work Abroad
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • crummey's Profile Photo

    Ice Road, NWT

    by crummey Updated May 30, 2003

    “Lac De Gras” is at approximately 64 degrees north; Very close to the Arctic Circle.

    The winters are long and cold. The primary industry is the diamond mines. the NWT Mining Act dictates for how long that people can stay. The mining camps are drug and alcohol free. There is a disproportionate male to female ratio.

    Ek’ati is the name of a Diamond mine near Lac De Gras, NWT. There are other diamond mines in the vicinity including Diavik Diamond mine on East Island, Lac De Gras and Snap Lake Diamond project slightly farther to the south. Alcohol is banned from these camps.

    The camps are designed with "arctic corridors" so that people rarely have to leave the buildings. In spare time from work, people press weights, exercise, pursue their individual hobbies, cruise the net, watch satellite TV, gossip etc..

    The nights are very long in winter and the northern lights are, of course, breath taking.

    If you are thinking about coming to the Lac De Gras region, access is by the “Ice Road” from late December to early April. For the rest of the year access is only by plane.

    The Ice Road

    Was this review helpful?

Northwest Territories Hotels

Top Northwest Territories Hotels

Yellowknife Hotels
105 Reviews - 222 Photos
Norman Wells Hotels
5 Reviews - 5 Photos
Inuvik Hotels
9 Reviews - 30 Photos

Instant Answers: Northwest Territories

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

91 travelers online now

Comments

Northwest Territories Transportation

Reviews and photos of Northwest Territories transportation posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Northwest Territories sightseeing.
Map of Northwest Territories