Flowers, Banff National Park

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Banff National Park

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  • Mountain Harebell
    Mountain Harebell
    by Lady_Mystique
  • Wild Flowers
    Wild Flowers
    by scottishvisitor
  • Pearly Everlasting
    Pearly Everlasting
    by Lady_Mystique
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    Take a stroll through the wildflower medows.

    by scottishvisitor Written Aug 13, 2005

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    Wild Flowers

    Take a walk along the boardwalk at Johnston Lake & stroll through the medow - bursting with scent & beautiful coloured wildlowers - I could have stayed all day with the gentle hum of insects, bird song & the least chipmunk (too quick to photograph) drarting to & fro.

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    White Arctic Bell-Heather

    by Lady_Mystique Written Mar 4, 2005

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    White Arctic Bell-Heather

    The delicate white flowers, somewhat star-like, may have inspired the genus name ('Cassiope') of this plant, for in Greek mythology Cassiopeia was set among the stars as a constellation.

    This species of White Arctic Bell-Heather, or Firemoss Cassiope, has a prominent groove on the lower side of each leaf which differentiate it from the other two species ( 'C. mertensiana' and 'C. stelleriana').

    This delicate, porcelain beauty flowers July-August near and above the timberline. It is prevalent also in dips and areas where it can catch the moisture from the melting snow off the mountains in the Spring.

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    Blue Pod Lupine

    by Lady_Mystique Written Mar 4, 2005

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    Blue Pod Lupine

    Here's another blue (blue-violet or violet, to be more exact) wildflower I simply love seeing!!
    I usually see them growing in moist meadows or forests, along streams, and anywhere from the lowlands up into the mountains. I even have many growing in my yard...the part I have left wild and which I plan to expand.

    These somewhat succulent (type of plant not how they taste!) Lupines are one of the tallest and lushest of the western species. They grow from 60 - 150 cm. tall and when you see them all blooming in colonies in a vast field, from June to August, they make an amazing display!!!

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    Blue-eyed Grass

    by Lady_Mystique Written Mar 4, 2005

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    Blue-eyed Grass

    Whenever I see a blue flower anywhere, I either take a photo of it or buy it .

    The Blue-eyed grass can grow anywhere from 10 - 50 cm. tall. Their blooming time is from April to September and they like to grow in moist places, generally in the open, from lowlands well into the mountains.

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    Pearly Everlasting

    by Lady_Mystique Updated Mar 4, 2005

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    Pearly Everlasting

    The native range of this plant is vast (NE Asia, Europe, Alaska, Canada, and northern U.S.). Hikers are familiar with it even in high elevations. And, like fireweed, it thrives in burn sites. It is a very hardy and drought-tolerant plant.

    This clump-forming perennial dies down to its roots each winter. In spring the shoots emerge and grow from 1-3 ft. high. The flowers begin in June and grow into the fall.

    Some Indians used the dry flowers to stuff pillows...something I just recently learned...and not a bad idea considering the cost of down pillows these days!!

    So far though, I just collect these flowers around where I live (again, NEVER in National Parks!!) for my dried flower displays.
    They last a very long time!
    I guess that's why they call them Pearly EVERLASTING!! :o)

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    Wild Strawberry

    by Lady_Mystique Written Mar 4, 2005

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    Wild Strawberry ~ Flower and Fruit

    Well, I have to include my favourite fruit here!! .....and the fruit of the wild strawberry is by far SUPERIOR in flavour to any of the cultivated garden varieties!!

    The flowers of the wild strawberry form after the leaves come out in the spring and there are usually 2-3 flowers in a cluster. The fruits are ripe around July in the lower mountain valleys.

    You will find them most often at the edges of woodlands, openings to forested areas, and along roadsides and open, dry areas such as old fields.

    Bears and other small animals LOVE to eat the wild strawberry. I usually only take a couple to savour (for my once yearly wild organic high!!) because I know Mother Nature gave the animals this fruit for their food and they are the ones responsible for spreading the wild strawberry seeds around.

    All parts of the wild strawberry plant (roots, leaves, fruits) have been used for medicinal purposes, especially by our European ancestors and the First Nations people.

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    Wild Rose

    by Lady_Mystique Written Mar 4, 2005

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    Wild Rose

    Growing up in Alberta I saw many wild roses growing around the places we went to on our hikes and other outdoor activities (picnics, Sunday drives, and visiting friends and family around the province).

    The wild rose is a woody shrub with small 5-petaled pink flowers. It has numerous tiny prickles on its stems (like most roses) so be careful when taking a whiff of its lovely fragrance!

    I have used the petals from the flowers (here where I live, NEVER from the park!!) to make Wild Rose Jelly, dried in tea mixtures, and as part of my potpourri recipes. Both are SO good (to smell and eat)!!!

    After blooming in June, the flowers form red seed pods (similar to miniature apples) called hips and stay on the bush all winter. These hips, because they are high in Vitamin C, are made into jams, syrups, and jellies (popular in Europe) and they are best picked after the first frost. Personally, I'm not too fond of rose hips. The native peoples would eat the rind and leave the seeds of the hips. Also, they would make arrows from the rose wood.

    The wild rose is the floral emblem of Alberta, and yet you will also find it growing profusely in B.C. where I live. It likes to grow in low to medium elevations and in clearings, open forests, and rocky slopes.

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    Mountain Harebell

    by Lady_Mystique Updated Mar 4, 2005

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    Mountain Harebell

    This is such a sweet and delicate beauty!!

    I love the colours of it...from pale to deep sky blue. And they're so very graceful on their thread-like stalks... waving in the wind.
    Can you hear them ringing??
    I know the faeries can!

    You will find these flowers of the Bluebell family growing on grassy slopes, canyons, and open or well-drained sites from sea-level to alpine elevations.

    They are perennials which bloom during July, August, and September and grow from 30 to 40 cm. high.

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    Fireweed

    by Lady_Mystique Written Mar 4, 2005

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    Fireweed ~ Gorgeous!!!

    I love this flower!! I see it everywhere...even here where I live on Vancouver Island.

    It's a member of the Evening Primrose family and grows to 6 ft. tall with each of its flowers 1" wide.

    It blooms during the months of July and August and grows in abundance in open areas, roadsides, and disturbed or cleared land.

    Its common name is derived from its ability to rapidly colonize recently burned areas after a forest fire.

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    White Mountain Avens

    by Lady_Mystique Written Mar 4, 2005

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    White Mountain Avens

    The 'Dryas octopetala' can easily be confused with the 'Dryas integrifolia' which grows mostly in the arctic.

    The dryads growing in the mountains ('Dryas octopelata') are best told apart from the other arctic dryads by the leaves...which are longer (up to 3.5 cm), wider, and a little rounder.

    They have scalloped edges and the upper leaf surfaces are wrinkled. The surface is often sticky from the chemicals excreted by the glands of the leaf. It grows low and close to the ground to protect itself from the harsh winds.

    You will find this plant in gravelly and rocky barrens, alpine meadows, and alpine ridges. It loves the sun!

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    Mountain Arnica

    by Lady_Mystique Written Mar 4, 2005

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    Mountain Arnica

    The flowers of the 'Arnica latifolia' is a cheerful and sunny discovery when hiking in the mountains!

    You will find it mostly in open forests, moist meadows, and rocky slopes at medium to high elevations.

    It blooms most of the summer and grows from 10 to 60 cm. high depending on the location it is growing in.

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    Purple Fleabane

    by Lady_Mystique Written Mar 4, 2005

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    Purple Fleabane

    This purple beauty grows in abundance in the Canadian Rockies.

    Resembling a daisy, it grows from 30 to 70 cm. high. and blooms most of the summer from July to September.

    You will find her in the more open areas where there is moisture.

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    Western Pasque Flower

    by Lady_Mystique Written Mar 4, 2005

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    Western Pasque Flower

    'Anemone occidentalis' or Western Pasque Flower is one of many beauties that grow in and around the Banff National Park.

    In the mountains their season is in July (earlier in the foothills and prairies around the mountains). I love to touch the soft hairy leaves and stems.
    But PLEASE don't pick them!!

    The flowers are short-lived, and are soon replaced by a feathery white seed head.

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    Legend of the Indian Paintbrush

    by Lady_Mystique Updated Mar 3, 2005

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    This is a great storybook, written by Tomie de Paulo, to read to children or for your own enjoyment...especially before heading out, or while you are in, the mountains.

    The tale is about how the flower, the 'Indian Paintbrush', came to bloom in Texas and Wyoming.

    The story's hero, Little Gopher, has a gift...he can paint beautiful images of his people. One day he has a dream in which he sees a white buckskin painted with beautiful colours, much like a sunset.
    Little Gopher tries his hardest to capture these colours in his paintings, but is never satisfied with the results.
    One night he hears a voice telling him to take the white buckskin to the place where he watches the sun set, and he does. There he finds paintbrushes filled with the colours of the sunset, sticking out of the ground. He paints the most beautiful colours on his buckskin!
    The next day, on the hillside, are beautiful flowers, for the brushes had become plants which bloom every spring to this day!!

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    INDIAN PAINTBRUSH

    by Lady_Mystique Written Mar 3, 2005

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    Indian Paintbrush

    There are over 200 species of paintbrushes that form the genus 'castilleia'.

    They are a member of the figwort family and are perennials that can grow to 60 cm. tall.
    They will be found growing at mid to high elevations, and in dry to moist areas such as forests, roadsides, and slopes.

    Dyes have been made from this plant. And, not just because I'm an artist, but this is one of my favourite of the wild flowers. I love the colour, shape, and the areas where I always find it growing!

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