Banff Town/nearby Lakes/Falls, Banff National Park

28 Reviews

Bannf Alberta

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Canada Day
    Canada Day
    by Twan
  • Canada Day
    Canada Day
    by Twan
  • Canada Day
    Canada Day
    by Twan
  • JanPeter74's Profile Photo

    Banff Town and Sulphur Mountain Gondola

    by JanPeter74 Updated Sep 15, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Banff seen from top of gondola

    Banff Town is the absolute point of departure for a trip in this park. It is a rather large town, considering the fact that it lies within the boundaries of a National Park. The place is very touristic, with lots of souvenir shops. hotels and restaurants. (for cheap and very good italian food, visit the "Old Spaghetti Factory", which is located in one of the malls.)
    The town has also a large visitors centre.

    Just outside the town you will find the Sulphur Mountain Gondola. Named after the mineral Hot Springs, that are located close to the base station of the gondola. The gondola ride and the views from the top provide you with great panoramas of Banff and the surrounding area. However, bear in mind that this southern part of Banff National Park is a bit less rugged than further to the north, so no glaciers or snowcapped mountains can be seen from here. (i.e. in summer of course).

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • JanPeter74's Profile Photo

    Vermillion Lakes

    by JanPeter74 Written Sep 15, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Vermillion Lakes and Mount Rundle

    Just outside Banff Townsite, you will find a short road that leads along the borders of Vermillion Lakes. It really is a short drive, but the views are absolutely awesome. You can view across the lakes and have a great view of Mount Rundle as well. A very nice area for amateur photographers as well.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    the town of Banff IS park of the National Park

    by richiecdisc Updated Nov 26, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    a nice stop but do you have time on your ticket?

    Banff is a fairly typical upscale ski resort kind of town, with lots of shopping, restaurants and bars. Everything seems to be made of wood or stone and it has rustic if ritzy feel to it. Of course, it's also a mecca for hikers, bikers, and paddlers making their way to the holy grail of Banff National Park. It is one of Canada's top tourist destinations in its own right and having been to Banff is a bit of a pilgrimage for any good Canadian. It's very popular with all tourists so expect it to be crowded.

    It's almost a bit overwhelming as a National Park gateway town but you can't deny its amenities, convenience or scenic locale. All that great stuff comes at a price with hotel rates high and campgrounds that feature wireless and hot tubs. Of course, you can camp in the park but many prefer the creature comforts that Banff provides. As the biggest town in Banff National Park and a part of the park, you need to pay a park entrance fee just to stop in town. To their credit, parking is free aside from this one detail. For that reason, our stop in Banff was fairly brief. We only had till 4 PM on our pass and had to get on the road by that time.

    We stopped by the very nice visitor center and did a little window shopping. It's a nice enough place but it sure would be a lot nicer if you did not have to pay to get in.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Road Trip
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Webboy's Profile Photo

    Bow River

    by Webboy Updated Aug 30, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bow River, Banff

    We didn't really get a chance to see the Bow River while staying in Calgary, so made it one of our first stops when we arrived in Banff.

    Back home in Glasgow we have the River Clyde, which is full of almost everything....dirt, shopping trolleys, litter, clothes etc.......so we were absolutely overwhelmed at our first glimpse of the Bow River! It looked so refreshing!

    With the river being so long, there are quite a few places to get a good view, however, for your convenience, here are the 3 places in and around Banff we thought had good views:

    1) From the Bridge at the bottom of Banff Avenue.
    2) From the viewing point at the Bow Falls.
    3) From almost any point on the Bow Valley Parkway.

    The picture opposite is taken from the Bridge on Banff Avenue.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Webboy's Profile Photo

    Bow Falls

    by Webboy Written Jul 22, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bow Falls

    The Bow Falls are fairly small compared to some of the other Falls you will see around Banff and Jasper national parks, but they are worth a visit nonetheless!

    They are very easy to find, although if you don't have a car it will take you around 10-15 minutes to walk from Banff town centre.

    Traveling from Banff Springs hotel, take the first turn on your right at the traffic lights, or, if you are coming from the town centre, take the last left just before the Banff Springs hotel.

    Follow the road right round. Be careful if you are driving, it is a tight winding road. It is a very short road, but its better to be careful!

    The car park is at the bottom of this road. The Bow falls are right next to the car park. Both the falls and the view down Bow River make the short trip worthwhile.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Camping_Girl's Profile Photo

    Cave & Basin National Historic Site of Canada

    by Camping_Girl Written Oct 21, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Entrance to Cave & Basin NHS
    4 more images

    Situated in the town of Banff, the Cave & Basin is the origin of Canada's national parks system. 3 CP Rail workers stumbled across the hot springs in 1883 & immediately realized their economic potential. A disagreement eventually broke out between this group of men & another group, over who had the rights to lay claim to the area & develop the hot springs. The Canadian government eventually stepped in & established the country's first national park around the hot springs, in order to preserve the area & ensure its availability to all citizens.

    The site was reopened to the public in 1985 & was commemorated as a National Historic Site at that time.

    Visitors to the site can tour the original cave and basin, open air pools above the site, watch a short film about the origins of the site and walk along 2 outdoor trails to see various spots where the springs bubble out of the ground. The Vermillion Lakes are visible in the valley below the site.

    The site is open year round except for a few days at Christmas & admission is very reasonable - less than $4 for an adult.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Webboy's Profile Photo

    Lake Minnewanka

    by Webboy Written Jul 22, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Me at Lake Minnewanka

    Lake Minnewanka was the first lake we visited during our stay in Banff. Perhaps not the most beautiful view you will see, the lake and the drive around Minnewanka road are still very impressive......at the very least, they are an excellent indication of the scenery you will be seeing while in the Banff National Park area.

    Lake Minnewanka can be found simply by following Banff Avenue northwards out of Banff and under Highway 1. Banff Avenue takes you directly onto Minnewanka Road, which in turn takes you to Lake Minnewanka.

    Minnewanka ring road also gives you access to Johnson Lake and Two Jack lake, both of which you can see from the roadside.

    We also got our first view of the Banff wildlife while taking pictures of Lake Minnewanka. Just as we turned around to head back to the car, 5-6 goats appeared on the road! Cool! We ended up passing loads of Goats on the drive around Minnewanka Road!

    P.s. Apologies for the angle of the photograph opposite..... not sure what happened there! ha ha ha!

    Was this review helpful?

  • windsorgirl's Profile Photo

    Banff Townsite

    by windsorgirl Written Jul 13, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cascade Gardens, Banff NP

    In the Banff Townsite, you will find all the amenities that a tourist could ever want including hotels, restaurants and souvenier shops. You will also find access to the Banff Hot Springs and Sulphur Mountain Gondola.

    One of my favourite spots in Banff was the lovely Cascade Gardens behind the Park Administration Building. It is open daily from June to Sept and features flower gardens and walking paths. Admission is free.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Redlats's Profile Photo

    Cascade Ponds picnic site

    by Redlats Written Oct 6, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cascade Ponds

    One of the amazing things about our national parks is that there are a lot of beautiful spots. Every road leads to another view of another mountain, lake or valley.

    Just north of Banff townsite is a quiet picnic ground called the Cascade ponds. Beautiful place with a nice (flat) hike around a reflective pond with mountains as a backdrop. I didn't discover this area until my 5th or 6th visit to Banff. Don't make the same mistake as me.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Webboy's Profile Photo

    Banff Avenue

    by Webboy Written Jul 22, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Banff Avenue & Cascade Mountain

    Banff Avenue runs North - South through Banff. It is the main street, and just happens to be the street that our Youth Hostel was on!

    Like any main town road it has its mixture of tourist shops, stores, Restaurants, Bars and a lot of traffic - both human and road traffic.....lots of it!

    You will find though that Banff Avenue is generally cleaner than most other town main roads..... and most town roads don't have such stunning views, especially the view in my picture to the left! The huge and very impressive Cascade mountain sits to the North of Banff Avenue, and the Bow River runs under the bridge at the south end...brilliant!

    You can't miss Banff Avenue, most streets cut across it at some point.

    A nice way to spend a morning or afternoon!

    Was this review helpful?

  • Redlats's Profile Photo

    Cave and Basin

    by Redlats Updated Jul 31, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Formerly the cold pool at the Cave and Basin

    As I have mentioned before, I have spent a lot of time in Banff. In the 1960's, we used to swim at the Lower Hot Springs which had a hot springs and a normal pool. Now the Lower Hot Springs is a historical site called the Cave and Basin. It was closed (I think in the 1970's) as the Parks could not keep the water clean enough to swim as the temperature of the hot springs decreased.

    The Cave and Basin Historic site has been restored back to the way it was in 1913 (so it looks different than I remember it in the 60's). There is a lot to see and read at this site. You can walk through a tunnel and find the original hot water basin in the cave where the hot springs were discovered. The smelly sulphur water is still there.

    Above the cave in the building that used to be the changerooms, etc. is an interpretive display of how Banff National Park was discovered (in 1885) and how it became Canada's first national park. Around the buildings is a short Discovery trail which wanders out above the buildings to see the warm water spring flowing down the hillside. Besides the Discovery trail, there is the Marsh trail - another short boardwalk below the centre and the Marsh Loop - a hike downstream of the Cave and Basin that I quite enjoyed. Even in winter, the warm water flows down the hillside, and tropical fish (non-native) survive there all year long.

    There is a cost to enter - $4 each in 2006. I don't think you need to pay to walk the interpretive hikes around the building.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • scottishvisitor's Profile Photo

    Banff a one horse town

    by scottishvisitor Updated Feb 7, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hey I'm the only horse here

    The horse and carriage rides in Banff Township don't come cheap, mass tourism always carries a price. You can let the cute little horse and carriage transport you around the town streets for fifteen dollars (Canadian) per person - minimum two people. It won't take up much of your time the ride lasts fifteen minutes - the only takers we saw were families with young children. Banff isn't big and can be walked easily but if you fancy a carriage ride - well why not? For information on other carriage rides contact the Trail Rider Store.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Redlats's Profile Photo

    Townsite hike along the Bow River

    by Redlats Updated Oct 7, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Park in downtown Banff

    In 2004, changes were made to the green space behind the Banff Park Museum and washrooms. The park was just upgraded with new grass, more care of the trees and a beautiful path along the Bow River.

    We found this path calm and quiet, and away from the maddening crowds of Banff streets. We saw birds and chipmunks playing, people on park benches watching the Bow flow by, reading, snoozing or strumming on their guitars. Just what we needed!

    This year we saw no elk wandering through the park either. We have seen them there in past years. They enjoy the calm and quiet as well.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Redlats's Profile Photo

    Bow Falls - 2004

    by Redlats Written Oct 7, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bow Falls - 2004

    As I said in the previous tip, the falls do not change much. When I recall our visits long ago, there was not as much parking as there is now. Now there is a large parking lot complete with spots for the ever-present tour buses.

    Just downstream a few hundred feet you will see part of the famous Banff Springs Golf course. This is a fancy golf course which where the wildlife has to be factored into your play. I'm not sure if I would go get my ball if it rolled under the bull moose reclining on the 8th fairway.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • Camping_Girl's Profile Photo

    Surprise Corner

    by Camping_Girl Written Oct 21, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    View of BSH from Surprise Corner
    4 more images

    Surprise Corner is situated at the intersection of Buffalo Avenue & Tunnel Mountain Drive. There is an elevated viewing platform here, where you have amazing views of the Banff Springs Hotel and the Bow Valley. This is THE place to go, for a great photo of the Banff Springs Hotel. The Bow Falls are just below the viewing platform & can be reached via a short trail.

    Alternate directions to Surprise Corner:

    Take Tunnel Mountain Road to Tunnel Mountain Drive and follow this road to Surprise Corner. This route is not accessible during the winter.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Backpacking
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Banff National Park

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

73 travelers online now

Comments

View all Banff National Park hotels